Opening

93% Guardians of the Galaxy Aug 01
80% Get On Up Aug 01
90% Calvary Aug 01
—— Behaving Badly Aug 01
44% Child Of God Aug 01

Top Box Office

58% Lucy $43.9M
61% Hercules $29.8M
91% Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes $16.8M
57% The Purge: Anarchy $10.5M
43% Planes: Fire And Rescue $9.5M
18% Sex Tape $6.1M
17% Transformers: Age of Extinction $4.7M
16% And So It Goes $4.6M
23% Tammy $3.5M
90% A Most Wanted Man $2.7M

Coming Soon

—— Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Aug 08
—— Step Up: All In Aug 08
—— Into The Storm Aug 08
—— The Hundred-Foot Journey Aug 08
86% What If Aug 08

New Episodes Tonight

86% The Bridge (FX): Season 2
91% The Divide: Season 1
83% Extant: Season 1
—— Graceland: Season 2
—— Hot in Cleveland: Season 5
50% Jennifer Falls: Season 1
—— Motive: Season 2
69% Mystery Girls: Season 1
—— Rogue: Season 2
100% Suits: Season 4
38% Taxi Brooklyn: Season 1
—— Wilfred: Season 4
43% Young & Hungry: Season 1

Discuss Last Night's Shows

73% Chasing Life: Season 1
—— Covert Affairs: Season 5
88% Finding Carter: Season 1
67% Matador: Season 1
—— Perception: Season 3
—— Pretty Little Liars: Season 5
—— Rizzoli & Isles: Season 5
—— Royal Pains: Season 5
—— Sullivan & Son: Season 3
57% Tyrant: Season 1

Certified Fresh TV

86% The Bridge (FX): Season 2
83% Extant: Season 1
79% Halt and Catch Fire: Season 1
88% Manhattan: Season 1
100% Masters of Sex: Season 2
73% Murder in the First: Season 1
97% Orange is the New Black: Season 2
97% Orphan Black: Season 2
82% Satisfaction: Season 1
87% The Strain: Season 1
85% Welcome to Sweden: Season 1
77% You're the Worst: Season 1

Vampyr - Der Traum des Allan Grey Reviews

Page 1 of 21
Christopher H

Super Reviewer

April 11, 2012
The plot can be a little light and incoherent at times, but Carl Theodor Dreyer's "Vampyr" manages to be an effectively creepy film. The gothic scenery and unsettling visuals give the film a "nightmare" sensibility that makes this a great horror movie to watch on a dark Halloween night. There are so many scenes in this move that are really well done. One of the things I admire about the film is it's kinetic cinematography, which gives way to very interesting viewpoints in a lot of scenes. One example is a scene were the camera puts us through the perspective of a man lying in a coffin as he is being carried to be buried in a graveyard. The camera points straight up through a small window in the coffin, which gives way to creepy bits were people are looking inside the coffin and views of a gothic church from an upward angle. The concept of being buried alive is pretty terrifying, which is why the first-person camera viewpoint makes the scene very effective. The film also uses shadows in a way that is both hypnotic and surreal. Despite being a sound movie, it might as well be called a silent film since there is very little dialogue spoken throughout. I highly recommend this movie to anyone who is a horror fan or is in the mood for a good spook-fest.
Graham J

Super Reviewer

October 23, 2011
Probably the most frightening film I've seen to come out of the 1930's. The visuals are still enough to give you nightmares.
MovieMaster12
MovieMaster12

Super Reviewer

April 30, 2011
How to describe Carl Theodor Dreyer's Vampyr: It's the cinematic equivalent of wandering alone in a graveyard at midnight. Allan Grey, a supernatural afficionado, stumbles on an eerie Inn in the Scandanavian countryside. It's there a vampire is feeding on the blood of children and enslaving townfolk to do his dark bidding. One such slave is the town quack -- an Einstein-looking, blood-lusting angel of death, forcing transfusions and treating ailing vamp-victim Leone with the dreaded vile marked with skull and crossbones. Dreyer was a visual genius, and he creates a universe of such chilling lucidity and atmosphere you might get dizzy mid-viewing. His camera lurches down dark corridors, scaling a wall of waltzing, shadowy ghosts locking the viewer in a maze of disorienting motion and menace. Shadows are now spiritual beacons bouncing around the flower-checkered walls and off of ghoulish, foggy ponds with no discernable tie to the figures that, we assume, originated them. They become perplexing, silhouetted characters all their own. Then actors get so under-exposed we can't tell the difference anymore. It's a nightmarish out-of-body-experience.

Made in 1931, Vampyr is a melange of sound and silence. Aural bites are sparse but they rattle and shake the Inn walls, perfectly timed and effectively reserved: the cries of children, maniacal laughter, a knock on the door from an unwelcome visitor, the rare and mysterious line of dialogue. "She must not die!" says Allan Grey's midnight guest before he scribbles a message on a strange package: TO BE OPENED AFTER MY DEATH. (I bet you can guess what happens next.)

There's an unsettling sense of know-how about Dreyer's demented vision. He has mastered what scares us: In a hallucinatory dream state, our hero wanders into a cottage and watches as he is buried alive. We are immediately placed in the body's subjectivity as the coffin lid comes down over the camera. A small glass window, conveniently placed over the victim's face, allows us to watch, from our backs, as twisted tree limbs and cloudy skies pass overhead. Heaven, or perhaps hell, smiles back, as the damned are carted off. The looming storm clouds and specks of sun constantly do battle over Dreyer's hellish country Inn (the first Overlook Hotel, Bates Motel, or even Hostel), where he stages his seminal horror masterpiece.
sanjurosamurai
sanjurosamurai

Super Reviewer

January 29, 2007
widely rejected by critics at the time of release, dreyers classic horror film must have been ahead of its time because critics and fans alike now love this film. the film is rigorously slow paced, in some senses patient and in other senses laborious, the strength of the film really seems to lie in striking images, especially towards the end of the film. the pace is excused thanks to a short running time making this a classic vampire tale that can be enjoyed many times over without much commitment.
Pierluigi P

Super Reviewer

December 4, 2010
Dreyer achieves the same bleak and haunting atmosphere that I reach in my imagination while I read Lovecraft or Poe.
DragonEyeMorrison
DragonEyeMorrison

Super Reviewer

December 16, 2008
Atmospheric horror that uses limited dialogue and a clever use of camera and lightning techniques to tell it's story. I do felt a bit lost regarding the second, so it might need a rewatch.
AJ V

Super Reviewer

September 3, 2010
I love vampire movies, but this one is from the early thirties when they were just switching to sound, so there is only dialogue and no music, and the people in the movie don't say much. It could have been good as a silent film, I think. This movie is silent and boring, plus it confused me. The best part is the ending.
thefog1331
thefog1331

Super Reviewer

June 30, 2010
Long on atmosphere but short on plot the film seems more like an expanded and bloated experimental piece using every camera gimmick possible for its time. Some of it works well like the dream sequence but the overuse of the same tricks and its thin story makes it a chore to sit through.
Mr Awesome
Mr Awesome

Super Reviewer

October 29, 2009
"Nots-feratu"
Sometimes, they say, you have to be in the right mood to appreciate a movie. But what does it say about the quality of that movie if it's intrinsic value can't be appreciated in any random circumstance? Vampyr, a film from 1932 (directed by the legendary Carl Dreyer), might've been better suited to the silent era, the addition of a soundtrack does it little favor. There's a sleepy, dream-like quality to it that, if anything, the sound detracts from, bringing us back into reality (watching it, I was never unaware that I was "watching" a movie, there was never a suspension of disbelief). The movie's pacing is, like most films of the silent era, very slow and deliberate, but it feels as if there's not alot being said by Dreyer. Also, I realize that it's not meant to be a horror film in the strict sense of the word, but I didn't find the atmosphere all that creepy either. It inferior to Nosferatu in every regard, and while it may deserve a second look by today's film historians, it's hardly the creepy classic it's so often touted as being. Perhaps, if I ever watch it again, I'll be in a more receptive state, and its qualities will grow on me. If I ever watch it again, that is.
Cindy I

Super Reviewer

June 3, 2007
This is without a doubt one of the coolest films I've ever seen. Carl Dreyer weaves a film that seems more dream -- or more likely nightmare -- than film. A loose storyline about vampirism ties together visuals that are mesmerizing. Included are a shadow that walks around without its owner, and a POV shot of a man's funeral -- from INSIDE the casket. Dreyer is one of the great directors and this film is evidence. Not to be missed.
Drew S

Super Reviewer

October 27, 2008
Perfect Halloween-time viewing for the patient film fan. This is as thematically complex, artistically ambitious, and visually gripping as anything made in the last decade. It's obviously very aged, but so rich and unique that it doesn't matter much at all. A real hidden treasure.
rubystevens
rubystevens

Super Reviewer

June 1, 2008
hypnotic gothic horror with many interesting visual effects. beautiful play of light and shadows. more about the style than the story. i need to watch more of dreyer's work
vieras e

Super Reviewer

February 13, 2007
The film is visually pleasing - beautiful and eerie. But as I haven't (alas!) read Carmilla, I did not get much out of it plot-wise.
John B

Super Reviewer

October 2, 2013
Turner Classic showed this Dreyer classic along with Joan of Arc and this one really is something. It maintains its creepiness despite its age..actually its age probably makes it creepy along with the silent soundtrack. An early masterpiece.
Ryan M
Ryan M

Super Reviewer

August 7, 2011
9.4/10

Real horror films get under your skin without asking, but in a way that you, in a way, sort of want them to. "Vampyr" is one of those horror movies that scares and intrigues but still leaves you with a good feeling. Perhaps this is because it is a feast not only intellectually; but also for anyone who views the horror cinema with a child-like sense of wonder. True horror fans enjoy films such as this one over the usual sadistic crap that plagues the genre these days. This is a rather definitive classic.

Running at only 73 minutes, "Vampyr" is short and therefore it must do a lot in that limited running time. I wasn't so sure how much I'd like it when I initially pursued it, but then I heard all this praise regarding its atmosphere, and that lead to my personal viewing. As always with films that are great, I'm glad I gave it a chance. In fact, I gave this thing TWO chances. I couldn't absorb everything on that first night that I watched it, but now I think I've taken in just about everything I CAN take in.

Allan Gray arrives in a small village to strange, supernatural occurrences. First, he sees an old man come in to his room in the middle of the night and leave a packet which says "to be opened upon my death" on Allan's table. Then, things just keep getting weirder-and-weirder.

But that's precisely the point of the film. "Vampyr" is outlandish and sometimes absurd, but both can be seen as two of the film's many charms. I believe that this film is unique and truly out-there; and for that, it deserves to be called "great cinema". I'm fine if not everyone agrees, and not everyone will, but I love surrealist films or any film that presents images as startling and creepy as this one. And yes, "Vampyr" makes for some seriously delightful surrealism.

With strange happening such as the discovery of dancing, very-much-lively shadows and the sudden illness of one of the village's residents, one has to question: just what the hell is going on? Why are old men suddenly being murdered by other men with guns? Why is Allen having dreams involving nothing but his head in a box? It is explained and implied that the village is under the curse of a Vampire; a term which is used with the spelling "vampyr" in the film. Given that this is a German film, I think we can all recognize why that is.

Black-and-White was not a choice for this film, visually. But as always with films made in a time where color was scarce, this visual style works better for the film than any color schemes ever could. Black-and-White actually lends "Vampyr" a creepy, gothic, atmospheric feel. Anybody who loves horror movies will appreciate this, making it easier to enjoy the film. This isn't the most accessible classic even for its genre, but it contains images so inspiringly creepy that I just have to go along and love it; because that is brutal honesty.

But great films are not always accessible. "Vampyr" is loved by many, and for good reason. The film itself unfolds like a true nightmare, yet those truly intoxicated won't want to leave. I drifted pleasantly in the depths of this film, because they were both deep and interesting. There is some serious directorial brilliance going on here, and directorial brilliance, quite frankly, usually amounts to all-out awesomeness. That happens here; oh yes it does. The experience of watching the film is so great, so rich, do DIFFERENT, that I'm having some problems properly describing it. Just know that the film is one of visual power, and love it or not, the images will stick with you. And if you are like me, they will influence you. And influence is always welcome; just not always existent. But I'm glad I was treated to watching this film, and even gladder that I found it so darned interesting and inspiring. You can find inspiration in the strangest of places. And in the horror genre is where I find quite a lot of mine.
Chris B

Super Reviewer

October 26, 2011
Considered one of the finest horror films of all time, Vampyr- Der Traum des Allan Grey is an undisputed masterpiece of cinema and still speaks volumes nearly 80 years later! Amazing visuals and filming techniques that are more impressive due to the year it was filmed and the tools available. This is a nicely filmed and disturbing film that is essential for Classic film buffs and horror fans alike!
brandonklaus2
brandonklaus2

Super Reviewer

April 6, 2009
Not bad as far as old horror movies go. I haven't seen this good of shadow acting since Hook.
Lord Naseby
Lord Naseby

Super Reviewer

August 4, 2010
For a 1931 film, I can see how people would find this one amazingly good. I know that the visual effects, for this time period, were amazing. However, I also know that this film, for a long time, was considered a low point in Dreyer's career. I couldn't really understand the plot very well. I wasn't sure who all the characters were (except for the doctor and the main character) and what was happening in the story. I could appreciate the film, I just didn't particularly enjoy it too terribly much. It was sort of decent though. Although, it had a monotonous tone to it which I disliked. For my readers, I would see it if you want to see a classic German expressionist film. It's not your average horror flick though.


TRIVIA TIME: The film was shot entirely on location. In fact, the old castle featured in the film also served as the lodging for the cast and crew.
littlecharmer1959
littlecharmer1959

Super Reviewer

August 29, 2008
Stunning visuals for the time and still very effective today. The story may have plot holes and not be up to scratch be with images this enticing it doesn't matter. Originally filmed as a silent with sparse amounts of dialogue added later, "Vampyr" is slow, dreamy and has a genuinally creepy atmosphere. A must see.
Page 1 of 21
Find us on:                     
Help | About | Jobs | Critics Submission | Press | API | Licensing | Mobile