Opening

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75% Lucy Jul 25
—— And So It Goes Jul 25
—— The Fluffy Movie Jul 25
93% A Most Wanted Man Jul 25

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91% Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes $36.3M
56% The Purge: Anarchy $29.8M
45% Planes: Fire And Rescue $17.5M
20% Sex Tape $14.6M
17% Transformers: Age of Extinction $9.8M
23% Tammy $7.4M
85% 22 Jump Street $4.7M
92% How to Train Your Dragon 2 $3.9M
49% Earth to Echo $3.3M
49% Maleficent $3.2M

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—— Guardians of the Galaxy Aug 01
—— Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Aug 08
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—— Let's Be Cops Aug 13
—— The Expendables 3 Aug 15

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90% The Divide: Season 1
83% Extant: Season 1
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—— Hot in Cleveland: Season 5
50% Jennifer Falls: Season 1
—— Motive: Season 2
69% Mystery Girls: Season 1
—— Rogue: Season 2
100% Suits: Season 4
38% Taxi Brooklyn: Season 1
—— Wilfred: Season 4
43% Young & Hungry: Season 1

Discuss Last Night's Shows

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—— Covert Affairs: Season 5
88% Finding Carter: Season 1
75% The Hotwives of Orlando: Season 1
67% Matador: Season 1
—— Perception: Season 3
—— Pretty Little Liars: Season 5
—— Rizzoli & Isles: Season 5
—— Royal Pains: Season 5
—— Sullivan & Son: Season 3
57% Tyrant: Season 1

Certified Fresh TV

85% The Bridge (FX): Season 2
83% Extant: Season 1
79% Halt and Catch Fire: Season 1
100% Masters of Sex: Season 2
73% Murder in the First: Season 1
97% Orange is the New Black: Season 2
97% Orphan Black: Season 2
82% Satisfaction: Season 1
86% The Strain: Season 1
85% Welcome to Sweden: Season 1
76% You're the Worst: Season 1

Where the Wild Things Are Reviews

Page 2 of 796
December 4, 2011
The parts about the boy and his interaction with his family were brilliantly done, but I just couldn't get into the monsters - they all looked like mascots to me, and I felt like they were too depressed. I also couldn't understand why they behaved the way they did - especially the main monster, who for some reason was called Carole, even though he was a man ... I felt the contrast between how ridiculous and fake the monsters looked and how realistic and "adult" their behavior was, was too much. I also felt that the film didn't really have a point, and i found myself trying to decide what the point of it was all the way through. There was really no plot, and the entire portion with the monsters, which was pretty much the entire film, could just be defined as the boy learning the importance of family. I feel like if the monsters were established better, it would have been easier to understand their motives for their actions. Those costumes were also horrible - they were big, hideous, and completely ridiculous. That being said, the main child actor was amazing, and literally carried the whole film. I liked the film overall, especially the parts where the boy is with his family, but I thought the bit with the monsters could have been more tactfully and concisely done.
July 15, 2014
Ok, count me amongst Jonze haters. While I find nothing wrong with the monster design, mashing naive with naturalistic, the (certainly thin) story irritate me to the bones, torn between hipstery chitchat and trite uterine metaphore.God save us.
Bethany E.
July 13, 2014
I remember liking this movie, but I should watch it again.
July 13, 2014
Wonderful movie. For the kid in all of us, it was like "Lego Movie" in the sense that it was a surprisingly potent, challenging and thoughtful story that was one of the best stories to behold. Only seen it once but it was one of the better family movies because of its uniqueness and one-of-a-kind-ness which was truly exotic and special to watch on TV. There's a lot going on that I didn't understand or missed out on. I just remember having the time of my life!!
Charles D. Borg
July 11, 2014
Magical and visually breathtaking, but Story lacks. Jonze stays faithful to the simplicity of the book and replaces plot with a powerful moral message: we can choose to FIND happiness in life, or destroy ourselves trying to fight against and control everything that comes our way.
November 10, 2012
Absolutely a mesmerising and magical movie experience! A spoilt boy runs away from home and learns about responsibilities when he becomes a king to a clan of furry cuddly creatures with big heads and sad faces.
Daenerys Stormborn
June 19, 2014
1. How is this a children's movie?
2. This got really boring at times
3. This is not the where the wild things are book I remember
Pablo Eterovic
June 18, 2014
7 años demoró Spike Jonze en traernos su siguiente película, esta vez una adaptación del libro para niños Where the wild things are. Max es un niño con una imaginación increíble. Tras una pelea con su madre, llega a un mundo que nadie podría imaginar. Allá lo reciben como rey, y se dará cuenta que la pura entretención no sirve en la vida. Excelente elección de voces para las bestias (Gandolfini, Dano, entre muchos otros), y muy buena música de Karen O. Como siempre, en lo visual, cada proyecto de Jonze es hermoso, sin embargo, creo que esa línea que no queda clara en la película (si es para niños o adultos), le juega en contra. Recomendable.
June 14, 2014
Surprisingly good as well as being surprisingly dark and depressing.
December 11, 2009
In my opinion, 'Where the Wild Things are' is an excellent adaptation of the book, the CGI is beautiful and the acting is superb, though the performance does lack in some scenes.
June 9, 2014
Very divisive...it's got the "kids/family movie" label weighing it down, and yet it is, well, a Spike Jonze movie that becomes thematically weighty for a kids' movie. How one should see it is as a finely made work of magic-realism, untainted by Hollywood commercialism despite being an adaptation of a timeless children's classic.
June 5, 2014
some children's tales are better left on paper.
May 29, 2014
Yeah, it may be not a suitable film for your little child because of the dark tone of fantasy, but "Where The Wild Things Are" is a real fantasy for your other child, with beautiful visual effects which combine real-role, computer animation and live puppeteering, brings a joyful and emotional in different ways with "Wild Things". Such a trigger for activate your imagination.
May 28, 2014
Although it's much darker than the children's book it's based on, Where the Wild Things Are is a masterpiece character study of young boy Max. From start to finish we are centered on his deeply, emotionally tattered childhood life. Max Records delivers an outstanding performance as young boy Max and manages to outshine the wild things themselves, which deserve praise for being done practically as opposed to digitally.
May 10, 2014
this movie is a masterpiece
July 17, 2009
There's always a certain amount of trepidation when a filmmaker gets their hands on a book that you loved as a child. Even if we overlook the general risk that the whole project may become a cynical Hollywood cash-grab, the director's vision may be so different to your childhood imaginings that it ends up tarnishing the original experience, perhaps permanently.

We find ourselves in precisely this predicament with Where The Wild Things Are. Maurice Sendak's 1963 book has become a classic in children's literature, beloved for generations and in various stages of development hell since the early-1980s. Spike Jonze is a director with a glowing reputation, but a seven-year gap between features isn't immediately reassuring. Fortunately, the results are very good, and while the film is by no means perfect, it remains a touching and compelling work.

There has been a fair amount of debate as to whether Where The Wild Things Are can be called a children's film. Certainly its marketing didn't position it as such: its trailers played more on the indie cred of Jonze, highlighting the soundtrack work by Karen O of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and using a re-recorded version of Arcade Fire's big hit 'Wake Up', which doesn't appear in the film.

This is a touchy subject given that Sendak's book has become so iconic: surely any successful adaptation must be considered a children's film? Additionally, I've railed against many so-called children's films which are blatantly not for children - films like Ratatouille and much of Dreamworks' output, which are films aimed at an adult audience disguised as children's animations. But what becomes quickly apparent is that Jonze didn't want to make a typical children's film - not by a long shot.

Instead, Jonze wanted to make a film about what it felt like to be a child - a film not just for children in a demographic sense, but about children in a behavioural sense. He wanted to capture the burgeoning, pre-pubescent energy of Max, exploring how his rage and frustration manifests itself as the Wild Things and how he comes to grow in realising how hard is it to govern one's personified rage. Certainly there's nothing about the film that could be called cutesy or sanitised, which comes as a relief given Disney's involvement in the early stages of development.

The next issue that any adaptation would have to confront is the story. Where The Wild Things Are is barely 10 sentences long, and sure enough there isn't a great deal of plot in the film. In a more extravagant fantasy vehicle, such as the ongoing Hobbit trilogy, the paucity of story would either be stretched out with ancillary material or serve as a jumping-off point to take things in a new direction. But again, Jonze does it differently: he completely acknowledges the limits of the source novel, delivering a film which is more about mood than story.

The visual tone of Where The Wild Things Are is one of whistful melancholy, into which the great pockets of childish energy can invade. The colour palette is rooted in earthy, wooden browns, pale yellows and the greys of faded stuffed toys, giving the world of the Wild Things an instant feeling of age and mystery. Lance Acord, who has worked with Jonze since Being John Malkovich, emphasises the scale of the Wild Things and their isolation; they tower over Max in the close-ups, but otherwise the landscape towers over them.

In creating this whistful tone, Jonze succeeds in both rooting the angst of Max and conveying the way in which time passes for a child of his age. Young children do not have the same grasp of efficient narrative storytelling that we embrace as adults; in their fantasies they often feel like they've been away for years, even if they can't describe everything they did in that time. Jonze beautifully captures the feeling present in the book that Max's adventure is like a half-remembered dream - and, as a bonus, works around the fact that not very much happens.

The film also deserves credit for the realisation of the Wild Things. Having toyed with various CG options between the early-1980s and mid-2000s, the creatures were eventually brought to life through the Jim Henson Workshop. Despite being partially created with animatronics, they have none of the creakiness or jerky movements that we associate with this form of puppeteering. And while some CGI was involved to sync up the dialogue with the characters' lip movements, they still have an amazing and distinctive physicality, without which the film would simply be a failure.

This brings us on naturally to the cast, who are generally very good. James Gandolfini is the stand-out among the voice actors, bringing a lot of anger to the part of Carol but also conveying the age of the Wild Things. Catherine Keener doesn't get a great deal of screen time, but she does convey the sense of frustration that sets the story in motion. As for the lead, Max Roberts takes a little while to bed into the role, but his performances is naturalistic enough to be convincing in the end.

The other great success of Where The Wild Things Are is its subtlety. The book has often been interpreted as a Freudian text, in which the Wild Things are different manifestations of Max's anger. The lazy thing to do in these circumstances would have been to divide up Max's personality traits and deal them out to the Wild Things, so that each one would represent something at the expense of proper characterisation. Instead, Jonze leaves it open to us to decide the different Wild Things' significance, letting us be as imaginative as Max is.

There are a couple of small problems with Where The Wild Things Are. In spite of consciously addressing the lack of plot and the choice of pacing, the film still feels slow or baggy in places. For everything that I've talked about, and all the successes in Jonze's approach, there remains a nagging feeling that more could have been done with the characters, which would in turn have justified the cinematic scale.

Another smaller problem is the sound mixing. While the musical soundtrack fits pretty well with the action on screen, at times it is difficult to discern what the Wild Things are saying, particularly during their first encounter with Max. This becomes less of a problem as the film goes on and the acting becomes more boisterous, but it prevents us from getting in the zone with the characters sooner, which may put younger viewers off.

Where The Wild Things Are is a very interesting achievement which will go down as one of the most intriguing and original children's adaptations in recent memory. While not everything about the story or its execution is entirely satisfying, Jonze deserves a lot of credit for capturing the mood and tone of Sendak's story, and for his realisation of the titular creatures. Whether as a playful exploration of a child's imagination or a complex Freudian journey, it is something that remain with you for a very long time.
Daniel Mumby
Daniel Mumby

Super Reviewer

April 14, 2014
There's always a certain amount of trepidation when a filmmaker gets their hands on a book that you loved as a child. Even if we overlook the general risk that the whole project may become a cynical Hollywood cash-grab, the director's vision may be so different to your childhood imaginings that it ends up tarnishing the original experience, perhaps permanently.

We find ourselves in precisely this predicament with Where The Wild Things Are. Maurice Sendak's 1963 book has become a classic in children's literature, beloved for generations and in various stages of development hell since the early-1980s. Spike Jonze is a director with a glowing reputation, but a seven-year gap between features isn't immediately reassuring. Fortunately, the results are very good, and while the film is by no means perfect, it remains a touching and compelling work.

There has been a fair amount of debate as to whether Where The Wild Things Are can be called a children's film. Certainly its marketing didn't position it as such: its trailers played more on the indie cred of Jonze, highlighting the soundtrack work by Karen O of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and using a re-recorded version of Arcade Fire's big hit 'Wake Up', which doesn't appear in the film.

This is a touchy subject given that Sendak's book has become so iconic: surely any successful adaptation must be considered a children's film? Additionally, I've railed against many so-called children's films which are blatantly not for children - films like Ratatouille and much of Dreamworks' output, which are films aimed at an adult audience disguised as children's animations. But what becomes quickly apparent is that Jonze didn't want to make a typical children's film - not by a long shot.

Instead, Jonze wanted to make a film about what it felt like to be a child - a film not just for children in a demographic sense, but about children in a behavioural sense. He wanted to capture the burgeoning, pre-pubescent energy of Max, exploring how his rage and frustration manifests itself as the Wild Things and how he comes to grow in realising how hard is it to govern one's personified rage. Certainly there's nothing about the film that could be called cutesy or sanitised, which comes as a relief given Disney's involvement in the early stages of development.

The next issue that any adaptation would have to confront is the story. Where The Wild Things Are is barely 10 sentences long, and sure enough there isn't a great deal of plot in the film. In a more extravagant fantasy vehicle, such as the ongoing Hobbit trilogy, the paucity of story would either be stretched out with ancillary material or serve as a jumping-off point to take things in a new direction. But again, Jonze does it differently: he completely acknowledges the limits of the source novel, delivering a film which is more about mood than story.

The visual tone of Where The Wild Things Are is one of whistful melancholy, into which the great pockets of childish energy can invade. The colour palette is rooted in earthy, wooden browns, pale yellows and the greys of faded stuffed toys, giving the world of the Wild Things an instant feeling of age and mystery. Lance Acord, who has worked with Jonze since Being John Malkovich, emphasises the scale of the Wild Things and their isolation; they tower over Max in the close-ups, but otherwise the landscape towers over them.

In creating this whistful tone, Jonze succeeds in both rooting the angst of Max and conveying the way in which time passes for a child of his age. Young children do not have the same grasp of efficient narrative storytelling that we embrace as adults; in their fantasies they often feel like they've been away for years, even if they can't describe everything they did in that time. Jonze beautifully captures the feeling present in the book that Max's adventure is like a half-remembered dream - and, as a bonus, works around the fact that not very much happens.

The film also deserves credit for the realisation of the Wild Things. Having toyed with various CG options between the early-1980s and mid-2000s, the creatures were eventually brought to life through the Jim Henson Workshop. Despite being partially created with animatronics, they have none of the creakiness or jerky movements that we associate with this form of puppeteering. And while some CGI was involved to sync up the dialogue with the characters' lip movements, they still have an amazing and distinctive physicality, without which the film would simply be a failure.

This brings us on naturally to the cast, who are generally very good. James Gandolfini is the stand-out among the voice actors, bringing a lot of anger to the part of Carol but also conveying the age of the Wild Things. Catherine Keener doesn't get a great deal of screen time, but she does convey the sense of frustration that sets the story in motion. As for the lead, Max Roberts takes a little while to bed into the role, but his performances is naturalistic enough to be convincing in the end.

The other great success of Where The Wild Things Are is its subtlety. The book has often been interpreted as a Freudian text, in which the Wild Things are different manifestations of Max's anger. The lazy thing to do in these circumstances would have been to divide up Max's personality traits and deal them out to the Wild Things, so that each one would represent something at the expense of proper characterisation. Instead, Jonze leaves it open to us to decide the different Wild Things' significance, letting us be as imaginative as Max is.

There are a couple of small problems with Where The Wild Things Are. In spite of consciously addressing the lack of plot and the choice of pacing, the film still feels slow or baggy in places. For everything that I've talked about, and all the successes in Jonze's approach, there remains a nagging feeling that more could have been done with the characters, which would in turn have justified the cinematic scale.

Another smaller problem is the sound mixing. While the musical soundtrack fits pretty well with the action on screen, at times it is difficult to discern what the Wild Things are saying, particularly during their first encounter with Max. This becomes less of a problem as the film goes on and the acting becomes more boisterous, but it prevents us from getting in the zone with the characters sooner, which may put younger viewers off.

Where The Wild Things Are is a very interesting achievement which will go down as one of the most intriguing and original children's adaptations in recent memory. While not everything about the story or its execution is entirely satisfying, Jonze deserves a lot of credit for capturing the mood and tone of Sendak's story, and for his realisation of the titular creatures. Whether as a playful exploration of a child's imagination or a complex Freudian journey, it is something that remain with you for a very long time.
May 20, 2014
I didn't find this particular story interesting. It's some kid who runs away to this land of weird animals and he does want he wants, a little bit of conflict for story substance and then becomes king. Meh. People say it's strange but too much time on the Internet and the weird movies I have seen makes this not weird at all.
May 16, 2014
A good film, not suitable for children who do not understand the profound message and would not like the sad and dark style.
October 25, 2009
No puedo decir si la historia es buena o mala, porque es tan lenta y tan pesada de ver, que nunca logro prestarle la suficiente atención como para siquiera entender de qué se trata.
Page 2 of 796
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