Critics Consensus

Thursday, Mar. 03 2011, 05:10 PM

This week at the movies, we've got a leapin' lizard (Rango, with voice work from Johnny Depp and Abigail Breslin); a fateful romance (The Adjustment Bureau, starring Matt Damon and Emily Blunt); a night to remember (Take Me Home Tonight, starring Topher Grace and Anna Faris); and an update of Beauty and the Beast (Beastly, starring Alex Pettyfer and Vanessa Hudgens). What do the critics have to say? In an animation landscape dominated creatively and commercially by Pixar, it's rare that a CGI feature brings much originality to the table. However, critics say that's the case with Rango, which they say is a manic, wildly inventive, very funny homage/parody of spaghetti Westerns.

Friday, Feb. 25 2011, 06:21 AM

This week at the movies, we've got midlife crises (Hall Pass, starring Owen Wilson and Jason Sudeikis) and automotive vengeance (Drive Angry, starring Nicolas Cage and Amber Heard). What do the critics have to say? In the past, the Farrelly brothers' deft mix of raunch and heart made for a potent comedic combination. However, with their latest, Hall Pass, critics say the brothers' aim is off; though the movie has some very funny moments, it's bogged down by a little too much gross stuff and a little too much sentimentality. With a title like Drive Angry, you pretty much know what to expect -- lots of action, and Nicolas Cage doing his unhinged thing, with subtlety and nuance left in the dust.

Thursday, Feb. 17 2011, 04:54 PM

This week at the movies, we've got a mystery man (Unknown, starring Liam Neeson and January Jones), a teenage alien (I Am Number Four, starring Alex Pettyfer and Timothy Olyphant), and a cross-dressing fed (Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son, starring Martin Lawrence and Brandon T. Jackson). What do the critics have to say? Lately, Liam Neeson has a thing for European intrigue. He journeyed to Paris to rescue his daughter in 2009's Taken, and now he heads to Berlin for Unknown, a twisty thriller that critics say undermines its strong premise with implausible plotting. Neeson stars as a man who falls into a coma after a car accident; when he awakens, he discovers his wife (January Jones) doesn't recognize him, and he's being targeted by shadowy forces.

Friday, Feb. 11 2011, 05:00 AM

This week at the movies, we've got romantic deception (Just Go With It, starring Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston); Bieber fever (Justin Bieber: Never Say Never, starring Justin Bieber and Miley Cyrus); Shakespearean lawn ornaments (Gnomeo and Juliet, with voice work by James McAvoy and Emily Blunt); and an epic journey (The Eagle, starring Channing Tatum and Jamie Bell). What do the critics have to say? If you're a 12-year-old girl with a severe case of Bieber fever, you'll probably love Justin Bieber: Never Say Never. If you're a parent, or if you're merely curious about the Bieber phenomenon, critics say you'll probably have a better-than-average time with this concert/behind-the-scenes doc.

Friday, Feb. 04 2011, 04:20 AM

This week at the movies, we've got undersea terror (Sanctum, starring Ioan Gruffudd and Richard Roxburgh), and a psycho roomie (The Roommate, starring Leighton Meester and Minka Kelly). What do the critics have to say? James Cameron loves high drama under the sea; his directorial credits include Piranha 2: The Spawning, The Abyss, and that little movie about an ocean liner that sank after hitting an iceberg. Cameron is the executive producer on Sanctum, and critics say the film maintains his flair for arresting visuals, but unfortunately the characters and plot are nothing particularly special. It looks like the folks behind The Roommate forgot to list a "critics wanted" ad, since it wasn't screened prior to release.

Friday, Jan. 28 2011, 07:48 AM

This week at the movies, we've got a vengeful assassin (The Mechanic, starring Jason Statham and Ben Foster) and an exorcism education (The Rite, starring Anthony Hopkins and Rutger Hauer). What do the critics have to say? If you're looking for an action star that can simultaneously seem both tough-as-nails and emotionally vulnerable, Jason Statham is your man. Critics say the star brings a level of emotional heft and gritty brawn to The Mechanic, which is otherwise a so-so action flick with some decent thrills but little originality. Given the number of horror flicks who turn demonic possession into schlock, The Rite gets points for taking the battle between good and evil seriously. However, critics say there's a difference between being serious and being dull.

Friday, Jan. 21 2011, 03:58 AM

This week at the movies, we've got friends with benefits (No Strings Attached, starring Natalie Portman and Ashton Kutcher) and a great escape (The Way Back, starring Ed Harris and Colin Farrell). What do the critics have to say? Once in a while a romantic comedy will come along and represent the messiness of the contemporary dating scene. Most of the time, however, we get movies with a little bit of insight and a lot of contrivance. Critics say No Strings Attached falls into the latter category, with moments of warmth and sweetness that are spoiled by a predictable narrative and a dirty mind.

Friday, Jan. 14 2011, 05:40 AM

This week at the movies, we've got an unlikely crime fighter (The Green Hornet, starring Seth Rogen and Jay Chou) and some shaky relationships (The Dilemma, starring Vince Vaughn and Kevin James). What do the critics have to say? The Green Hornet, who began life as the star of a 1930s radio serial, is a little late to the gritty superhero reboot club. And the critics say despite the direction of the oft-whimsical Michel Gondry and the presence of likeable everyman Seth Rogen in the title role, The Green Hornet doesn't quite succeed as a superhero flick or as a subversive send-up of the genre.

Friday, Jan. 07 2011, 03:51 AM

This week at the movies, we?ve got courageous Crusaders (Season of the Witch, starring Nicolas Cage and Ron Perlman) and a country comeback (Country Strong, starring Gwyneth Paltrow and Tim McGraw). What do the critics have to say? Say what you will about Nicolas Cage, but give the man credit: at a time when too many movie stars studiously protect their images, he's unafraid to look ridiculous. Sometimes, his devil-may-care attitude pays off (see Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans), and sometimes, well, we get stuff like Season of the Witch, a Medieval action flick that critics say is too dull to qualify as so-bad-it's-good kitsch.

Thursday, Dec. 23 2010, 05:03 AM

Happy holidays from RT! This week at the movies, we've got frontier justice (True Grit, starring Jeff Bridges and Hailee Steinfeld), family awkwardness (Little Fockers, starring Ben Stiller and Robert De Niro), and a fantastic voyage (Gulliver's Travels, starring Jack Black and Amanda Peet). What do the critics have to say? It takes guts to try to fill John Wayne's shoes. But if anyone can substitute for the Duke, well, why not the Dude? The critics say the Coen Brothers' (relatively) straightforward remake of True Grit is a rewarding movie in its own right -- it's tough, sly, and filled with marvelous performances.

Friday, Dec. 17 2010, 03:53 AM

This week at the movies, we?ve got a combative computer (Tron Legacy, starring Jeff Bridges and Garrett Hedlund), buffoonish bears (Yogi Bear, starring Dan Akroyd and Justin Timberlake), a rollicking romance (How Do You Know, starring Reese Witherspoon and Paul Rudd), a promising pugilist (The Fighter, starring Mark Wahlberg and Christian Bale), and brooding ballerinas (Black Swan, starring Natalie Portman and Mila Kunis). What do the critics have to say? Upon its release in 1982, TRON was hailed as a technical marvel; its status as one of the first films to rely prominently on computer-generated images helped to cover the fact that the plot was a little goofy. Now, the long gestating and heavily-anticipated sequel Tron Legacy is here, and critics say it has the opposite problem.

Friday, Dec. 10 2010, 05:29 AM

This week at the movies, we've got a spiritual journey (The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, starring Georgie Henley and Skandar Keynes) and some European intrigue (The Tourist, starring Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie). What do the critics have to say?

Friday, Dec. 10 2010, 05:28 AM

How things change. When Disney released TRON back in 1982, the science fiction adventure -- set against an alternate reality inside a machine and using groundbreaking computer animation -- was met with an indifferent response by mainstream audiences and critics, grossing a middling $33 million at the US box office and drawing mixed reviews (as RT's 68 per cent reflects). "Does any one remember that movie TRON?" went the joke on The Simpsons; and not so long ago. But plenty of kids who saw the movie at the time -- and on video since -- were enthralled by the digital world of the Grid, and like that year's similarly underperforming Blade Runner, TRON went on to become a cult classic that has been revalued over the years for its seminal effects work. And so, 28 years later, we arrive at the sequel that many would not have expected: TRON: Legacy. Disney have been building their $200 million-dollar holiday tentpole up for some time now, with a huge marketing campaign, a buzzed about soundtrack, and numerous teasers of the new 3D visual world the filmmakers have strived to create. But how will the critics respond? Will the sequel become the unofficial victory lap the first film never received, or will it meet the same fate as its predecessor? It's too early to call at this stage, and while the film's leaning to the above-average end of the Tomatometer, the game could change as reviews start to flood in over the next week.

Friday, Dec. 03 2010, 08:57 AM

This week at the movies brings just one wide release: the martial arts/Western/fantasy mashup The Warrior's Way, starring Dong-gun Jang and Kate Bosworth. What do the critics have to say? We'd love to give you the critical lowdown on The Warrior's Way, but unfortunately it appears that the film wasn't screened prior to release. Dong-gun Jang stars as a swordsman who flees to America after refusing a mission from his warrior clan; when his former compatriots come looking for him, he must protect his new friends from danger. Kids, take a break from playing Way of the Samurai and guess that Tomatometer!

Wednesday, Nov. 24 2010, 04:59 AM

This week at the movies, we've got a hairy situation (Tangled, with voice work from Mandy Moore and Zachary Levi); cabaret dreams (Burlesque, starring Christina Aguilera and Cher); a revenge rampage (Faster starring Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson and Billy Bob Thornton); and amour pharma (Love & Other Drugs, starring Anne Hathaway and Jake Gyllenhaal). What do the critics have to say? Disney has always had a knack for taking classic fairy tales and making them fresh. And while the critics say Tangled, a reimagining of Rapunzel, may not have the depth of the studio's animated classics, it's a visually stunning, emotionally resonant piece of family entertainment.

Friday, Nov. 19 2010, 03:35 PM

This week at the movies, we've got Hogwarts horrors (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part I, starring Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson) and a prison break (The Next Three Days, starring Russell Crowe and Elizabeth Banks). What do the critics have to say? Pottermaniacs, the wait is finally over - sort of. The first installment of the series' two part finale, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, is here, and the critics say that despite occasional lags in pacing and a (perhaps necessarily) abrupt conclusion, the movie mostly delivers, thanks in large part to the now-full-grown trio of lead actors.

Friday, Nov. 12 2010, 11:07 AM

Another year, another Harry Potter movie -- and it's not over yet, with Warner Bros.' cleverly halving the final installment of the series to ensure audiences will be back to do it all again come next summer. But for now we have Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part I, which marks the seventh film of J.K. Rowling's publishing phenomenon, and the beginning of the end of one of history's most successful movie franchises.

Friday, Nov. 12 2010, 04:30 AM

This week at the movies, we've got a runaway train (Unstoppable, starring Denzel Washington and Chris Pine), chat show intrigue (Morning Glory, starring Rachel McAdams and Harrison Ford), and an alien invasion (Skyline, starring Donald Faison and Eric Balfour). What do the critics have to say? Director Tony Scott has taken some knocks in recent years, but give the man credit: he knows how to stage a white-knuckle action scene. And in Unstoppable, the tale of an out-of-control locomotive, critics say he's reeled off a whole string of them, making for one of the most purely enjoyable action flicks of the year.

Friday, Nov. 05 2010, 05:04 AM

This week at the movies, we've got a reformed supervillain (Megamind, with voice work from Will Ferrell and Tina Fey); a crazed cross-country trek (Due Date, starring Robert Downey Jr. and Zach Galifianakis); and some pained, poetic women (For Colored Girls, starring Thandie Newton and Janet Jackson). What do the critics have to say? Megamind, a tale of a washed-up superhero and an evil mastermind who sees the error of his ways, shares some cosmetic similarities with a couple of recent animated features - namely, The Incredibles and Despicable Me. Still, critics say Megamind has a strong voice cast, strong visuals, and a loopy sense of humor that help to make up for a slightly stale premise and some pacing problems.

Friday, Oct. 29 2010, 03:12 PM

This week at the movies, Jigsaw's comin' at ya in three dimensions in Saw 3D, starring Tobin Bell and Cary Elwes. What do the critics have to say? With the possible exceptions of Elvis and 2Pac, few can rival Jigsaw for posthumous productivity. We'd love to tell you if the critics think the mad, methodical killer is back in top form in Saw 3D, but few of them have seen the movie at press time. This time out, the survivors of Jigsaw's evil schemes seek help from a self help guru - who turns out to have a dark past of his own. Kids, stop playing with that chainsaw and guess that Tomatometer!


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