Alice's Review of Love Actually


  • 6 months ago via Flixster
    Love Actually

    Love Actually (2003)

    Some believe "Love Actually" is a senseless gimmick - a surface holiday love story with beautiful people... and not even a holiday story at that, as seen from recent vehement debates (and maybe not even beautiful people, owing to the goofus face of Kris Marshall who's at least got a big knob). For me and countless others though, never has so many intertwining stories meshed so well with the messages of peace, goodwill, love of all kinds, and even gifting. There is seriously no character or storyline that I don't like.

    To those who say Jamie and Aurelia falling in love without speaking the same language is stupid and unrealistic, consider the intuitive connection that some people have and how they understand each other and communicate through actions and looks other than words, forming emotional bonds through the journey of misunderstanding and miscommunication.

    To those who say Sarah's an idiot for answering her mentally ill brother's phone call in the middle of getting it on with hot Karl, consider how that obsessive impulse of hers is to show that she needs to take care of him as much as he needs taking are of, and perhaps that's why she shouldn't have a romantic relationship right now.

    To those who hate Mia for seducing Harry, consider the slut-shaming double standard of women always being the seducers and the men always having no choice but to be seduced. Mia flirts with her married boss; he is still culpable for deceiving his wife.

    To those who think Colin and the American quintet is misogynistic and anti-American, consider the pure, "lust, actually" fantasy fulfillment in an otherwise pretty earnest, British movie. In an arguable attempt at showing female agency, Colin is no longer the pushy manwhore; the women are now the pursuers, and their totally obvious macking techniques show that they are quite aware of the easy-American-girl-who-falls-for-foreigners stereotype, and they use it to their advantage.

    To those who say Mark is a pansy for harboring romantic feelings for Juliet, a woman he seems to hardly know (as evidenced allegedly by their few scenes together), consider her honest self-deprecation (claiming she's nice aside from for her bad taste in pie), amiability (in hoping she and Mark can be better friends), and direct motivation (in pursuing the video she knows he clearly has). In sum, she HAS a personality and is certainly likable, even lovable. To those who say they are both douches - he for professing his feelings and she for kissing him - consider Mark's utterly agenda-less act of love as a gift of truth, friendship, and apology for his coldness, and Juliet's kiss as one of comfort and thanks.

    I love "Love Actually," and anybody who doesn't should get a heart!

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