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Smultronstället (Wild Strawberries)

Smultronstället (Wild Strawberries)

(1957)
9 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes

[b]Bride of the Monster (Wood, 1956)[/b] 1/2*

Worse and funnier than [b]Plan 9 From Outer Space[/b], IMO.

"He tampered in God's domain."

[b]Say Anything... (Crowe, 1989)[/b] ****

I connected well with the character of Lloyd Dobler (one of my new favorite characters in film), and the story and dialogue were very engaging and intriguing. Plus, the music fit really well with the situations the characters were in.

[b]Wild Strawberries (Bergman, 1957)[/b] ****

Victor Sjostrom gave a good performance as Isak Borg, I liked the narrative, and I had a different kind of emotional response to every dream/flashback sequence Isak had. Also, I loved the cinematography and how Bergman directed it.

An example of this is the scene where Marianne is telling Isak about when he wouldn't let her and Evald stay with him; the camera first focuses on Marianne, but when she tells Isak about what he said, the camera pans over to Isak so the viewer can see his reaction to what he said.

This was my first Bergman, and it was far from a disappointment.

[b]Persona (Bergman, 1966)[/b] ***

What....the...heck? While I liked the performances by Andersson and Ullman, and Bergman's direction is very good, in particular during Alma's monologue about her orgasm on the beach, his use of imagery during the scene was incredible. Also, I loved the cinematography, and the opening sequence is a nice touch...the images of a film projector turning on and showing images from film's early days tell the viewer that Bergman's opus is a film, not reality, IMO.

However, call me stupid, but I had a hard time figuring out how Elisabet and Alma [SPOILER]merged into one even though they are totally different from one another[/SPOILER], and I didn't understand why Alma's second monologue was in the film twice, once when the camera faces Elisabet, and the 2nd time it faces Alma. Also, I didn't understand the importance of the two dream sequences and if they were to symbolize anything.

Still, I liked it, but I'll have to watch it again.

[b]Come and See (Klimov, 1985)[/b] ****1/2

[b]WARNING. CONTAINS SPOILERS.[/b]

Whoa. What a powerful film. I loved Florya's development and progression throughout the film, and Klimov's direction is incredible. I especially like how he makes the audience feel like they are certain characters, in particular when we hear a little hum after Florya is struck deaf by artillery that lasts throughout the film, and when the buildings are being burned down with people inside, the viewer feels like he is watching the massacre.

And the images of Florya destroying the Hitler portrait and the montage afterwards will forever be etched into my memory.

Overall, a powerful and disturbing film, but it's so depressing I wouldn't watch it again and again.

Come and See (Idi i smotri)

Come and See (Idi i smotri)

(1985)
9 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes

[b]Bride of the Monster (Wood, 1956)[/b] 1/2*

Worse and funnier than [b]Plan 9 From Outer Space[/b], IMO.

"He tampered in God's domain."

[b]Say Anything... (Crowe, 1989)[/b] ****

I connected well with the character of Lloyd Dobler (one of my new favorite characters in film), and the story and dialogue were very engaging and intriguing. Plus, the music fit really well with the situations the characters were in.

[b]Wild Strawberries (Bergman, 1957)[/b] ****

Victor Sjostrom gave a good performance as Isak Borg, I liked the narrative, and I had a different kind of emotional response to every dream/flashback sequence Isak had. Also, I loved the cinematography and how Bergman directed it.

An example of this is the scene where Marianne is telling Isak about when he wouldn't let her and Evald stay with him; the camera first focuses on Marianne, but when she tells Isak about what he said, the camera pans over to Isak so the viewer can see his reaction to what he said.

This was my first Bergman, and it was far from a disappointment.

[b]Persona (Bergman, 1966)[/b] ***

What....the...heck? While I liked the performances by Andersson and Ullman, and Bergman's direction is very good, in particular during Alma's monologue about her orgasm on the beach, his use of imagery during the scene was incredible. Also, I loved the cinematography, and the opening sequence is a nice touch...the images of a film projector turning on and showing images from film's early days tell the viewer that Bergman's opus is a film, not reality, IMO.

However, call me stupid, but I had a hard time figuring out how Elisabet and Alma [SPOILER]merged into one even though they are totally different from one another[/SPOILER], and I didn't understand why Alma's second monologue was in the film twice, once when the camera faces Elisabet, and the 2nd time it faces Alma. Also, I didn't understand the importance of the two dream sequences and if they were to symbolize anything.

Still, I liked it, but I'll have to watch it again.

[b]Come and See (Klimov, 1985)[/b] ****1/2

[b]WARNING. CONTAINS SPOILERS.[/b]

Whoa. What a powerful film. I loved Florya's development and progression throughout the film, and Klimov's direction is incredible. I especially like how he makes the audience feel like they are certain characters, in particular when we hear a little hum after Florya is struck deaf by artillery that lasts throughout the film, and when the buildings are being burned down with people inside, the viewer feels like he is watching the massacre.

And the images of Florya destroying the Hitler portrait and the montage afterwards will forever be etched into my memory.

Overall, a powerful and disturbing film, but it's so depressing I wouldn't watch it again and again.

Persona

Persona

(1966)
9 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes

[b]Bride of the Monster (Wood, 1956)[/b] 1/2*

Worse and funnier than [b]Plan 9 From Outer Space[/b], IMO.

"He tampered in God's domain."

[b]Say Anything... (Crowe, 1989)[/b] ****

I connected well with the character of Lloyd Dobler (one of my new favorite characters in film), and the story and dialogue were very engaging and intriguing. Plus, the music fit really well with the situations the characters were in.

[b]Wild Strawberries (Bergman, 1957)[/b] ****

Victor Sjostrom gave a good performance as Isak Borg, I liked the narrative, and I had a different kind of emotional response to every dream/flashback sequence Isak had. Also, I loved the cinematography and how Bergman directed it.

An example of this is the scene where Marianne is telling Isak about when he wouldn't let her and Evald stay with him; the camera first focuses on Marianne, but when she tells Isak about what he said, the camera pans over to Isak so the viewer can see his reaction to what he said.

This was my first Bergman, and it was far from a disappointment.

[b]Persona (Bergman, 1966)[/b] ***

What....the...heck? While I liked the performances by Andersson and Ullman, and Bergman's direction is very good, in particular during Alma's monologue about her orgasm on the beach, his use of imagery during the scene was incredible. Also, I loved the cinematography, and the opening sequence is a nice touch...the images of a film projector turning on and showing images from film's early days tell the viewer that Bergman's opus is a film, not reality, IMO.

However, call me stupid, but I had a hard time figuring out how Elisabet and Alma [SPOILER]merged into one even though they are totally different from one another[/SPOILER], and I didn't understand why Alma's second monologue was in the film twice, once when the camera faces Elisabet, and the 2nd time it faces Alma. Also, I didn't understand the importance of the two dream sequences and if they were to symbolize anything.

Still, I liked it, but I'll have to watch it again.

[b]Come and See (Klimov, 1985)[/b] ****1/2

[b]WARNING. CONTAINS SPOILERS.[/b]

Whoa. What a powerful film. I loved Florya's development and progression throughout the film, and Klimov's direction is incredible. I especially like how he makes the audience feel like they are certain characters, in particular when we hear a little hum after Florya is struck deaf by artillery that lasts throughout the film, and when the buildings are being burned down with people inside, the viewer feels like he is watching the massacre.

And the images of Florya destroying the Hitler portrait and the montage afterwards will forever be etched into my memory.

Overall, a powerful and disturbing film, but it's so depressing I wouldn't watch it again and again.

Bride of the Monster

Bride of the Monster

(1955)
9 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes

[b]Bride of the Monster (Wood, 1956)[/b] 1/2*

Worse and funnier than [b]Plan 9 From Outer Space[/b], IMO.

"He tampered in God's domain."

[b]Say Anything... (Crowe, 1989)[/b] ****

I connected well with the character of Lloyd Dobler (one of my new favorite characters in film), and the story and dialogue were very engaging and intriguing. Plus, the music fit really well with the situations the characters were in.

[b]Wild Strawberries (Bergman, 1957)[/b] ****

Victor Sjostrom gave a good performance as Isak Borg, I liked the narrative, and I had a different kind of emotional response to every dream/flashback sequence Isak had. Also, I loved the cinematography and how Bergman directed it.

An example of this is the scene where Marianne is telling Isak about when he wouldn't let her and Evald stay with him; the camera first focuses on Marianne, but when she tells Isak about what he said, the camera pans over to Isak so the viewer can see his reaction to what he said.

This was my first Bergman, and it was far from a disappointment.

[b]Persona (Bergman, 1966)[/b] ***

What....the...heck? While I liked the performances by Andersson and Ullman, and Bergman's direction is very good, in particular during Alma's monologue about her orgasm on the beach, his use of imagery during the scene was incredible. Also, I loved the cinematography, and the opening sequence is a nice touch...the images of a film projector turning on and showing images from film's early days tell the viewer that Bergman's opus is a film, not reality, IMO.

However, call me stupid, but I had a hard time figuring out how Elisabet and Alma [SPOILER]merged into one even though they are totally different from one another[/SPOILER], and I didn't understand why Alma's second monologue was in the film twice, once when the camera faces Elisabet, and the 2nd time it faces Alma. Also, I didn't understand the importance of the two dream sequences and if they were to symbolize anything.

Still, I liked it, but I'll have to watch it again.

[b]Come and See (Klimov, 1985)[/b] ****1/2

[b]WARNING. CONTAINS SPOILERS.[/b]

Whoa. What a powerful film. I loved Florya's development and progression throughout the film, and Klimov's direction is incredible. I especially like how he makes the audience feel like they are certain characters, in particular when we hear a little hum after Florya is struck deaf by artillery that lasts throughout the film, and when the buildings are being burned down with people inside, the viewer feels like he is watching the massacre.

And the images of Florya destroying the Hitler portrait and the montage afterwards will forever be etched into my memory.

Overall, a powerful and disturbing film, but it's so depressing I wouldn't watch it again and again.

Say Anything...

Say Anything...

(1989)
9 years ago via Rotten Tomatoes

[b]Bride of the Monster (Wood, 1956)[/b] 1/2*

Worse and funnier than [b]Plan 9 From Outer Space[/b], IMO.

"He tampered in God's domain."

[b]Say Anything... (Crowe, 1989)[/b] ****

I connected well with the character of Lloyd Dobler (one of my new favorite characters in film), and the story and dialogue were very engaging and intriguing. Plus, the music fit really well with the situations the characters were in.

[b]Wild Strawberries (Bergman, 1957)[/b] ****

Victor Sjostrom gave a good performance as Isak Borg, I liked the narrative, and I had a different kind of emotional response to every dream/flashback sequence Isak had. Also, I loved the cinematography and how Bergman directed it.

An example of this is the scene where Marianne is telling Isak about when he wouldn't let her and Evald stay with him; the camera first focuses on Marianne, but when she tells Isak about what he said, the camera pans over to Isak so the viewer can see his reaction to what he said.

This was my first Bergman, and it was far from a disappointment.

[b]Persona (Bergman, 1966)[/b] ***

What....the...heck? While I liked the performances by Andersson and Ullman, and Bergman's direction is very good, in particular during Alma's monologue about her orgasm on the beach, his use of imagery during the scene was incredible. Also, I loved the cinematography, and the opening sequence is a nice touch...the images of a film projector turning on and showing images from film's early days tell the viewer that Bergman's opus is a film, not reality, IMO.

However, call me stupid, but I had a hard time figuring out how Elisabet and Alma [SPOILER]merged into one even though they are totally different from one another[/SPOILER], and I didn't understand why Alma's second monologue was in the film twice, once when the camera faces Elisabet, and the 2nd time it faces Alma. Also, I didn't understand the importance of the two dream sequences and if they were to symbolize anything.

Still, I liked it, but I'll have to watch it again.

[b]Come and See (Klimov, 1985)[/b] ****1/2

[b]WARNING. CONTAINS SPOILERS.[/b]

Whoa. What a powerful film. I loved Florya's development and progression throughout the film, and Klimov's direction is incredible. I especially like how he makes the audience feel like they are certain characters, in particular when we hear a little hum after Florya is struck deaf by artillery that lasts throughout the film, and when the buildings are being burned down with people inside, the viewer feels like he is watching the massacre.

And the images of Florya destroying the Hitler portrait and the montage afterwards will forever be etched into my memory.

Overall, a powerful and disturbing film, but it's so depressing I wouldn't watch it again and again.

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Intel Hollywood Star Program (July 2012 - December 2012)
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