David Gordon Green - Rotten Tomatoes

David Gordon Green

Highest Rated:   94% Hunter Gatherer (2016)
Lowest Rated:   5% Nature Calls (2012)
Birthday:  
Birthplace:   Not Available
Writer/director/producer David Gordon Green arguably qualifies as the most individualistic American filmmaking voice to emerge during the early 21st century. In his early work, Green demonstrated an instinctual feel for Southern Americana, landscapes, and populace, and laudably broke away from traditional narrative structures and character development to such a degree that his first three features (uniformly rooted in the said onscreen elements) are instantly identifiable as his own. A native of Little Rock, AR, Green grew up as the son of a medical school dean father and a Lamaze instructor mother. As a young man, he religiously watched films, yet (unsurprisingly, given the iconoclastic approach to the medium that he ultimately embraced) gravitated far more to nontraditional narratives, such as Walkabout, Killer of Sheep, and the features of Terrence Malick (Days of Heaven) than he did to buttered popcorn Hollywood fare. As time rolled on, Green began to envision a lifelong career for himself as a filmmaker, and took some of his first formal steps in that direction by enrolling in the film production program at the North Carolina School for the Arts after high school. A student consistently at the top of his class, he turned out a number of acclaimed and breathtakingly original shorts, one of which, Pleasant Grove (1996), evolved into Green's independently financed first feature, George Washington (2000). Scripted by Green and shot during the summer of 1999, George Washington loosely interweaves events from the lives of several African-American children coming of age in rural, impoverished North Carolina over the course of one long, mythical summer. The lead character (who dreams openly of being elected President of the United States, hence the film's title) suffers from an unusual cranial disability that plays into his successful act of heroism -- a courageous attempt to save another little boy from death -- while another tragic incident involving a fatal accident manifests itself in the community. As would become his trademarks, Green cast a plethora of nonprofessional actors, employed heavy improvisation, and resisted any attempts at conventional storytelling. A shattering debut to end all, George Washington took the press by storm when it bowed in 2000, and made Green's name a household word in the independent filmmaking community. Among other accomplishments, it won four distinguished honors (including Best Picture) at the 2000 Independent Spirit Awards, netted the Discovery Award at the 2000 Toronto Film Festival, and won Best First Film for Green at the New York Film Critics Circle Awards. In terms of critical raves, its admirers included A.O. Scott of the New York Times, who called it "a dream of a movie" and compared it to William Faulkner, not exactly small praise for a tyro director on his first time out.Green waited three years before authoring and directing a follow-up to George Washington. The result, 2003's romantic drama All the Real Girls, cast one of the supporting players from the director's first film, Paul Schneider, as Paul, a twentysomething from a small Southern town who earns his keep repairing cars, and who lives with his mother. Sexually experienced in the extreme, he's slept with nearly everyone in town but finds it difficult to sustain a long, permanent, and meaningful relationship, which makes it doubly difficult when he falls deeply in love with a newcomer, boarding-school student Noel (Zooey Deschanel) and draws the ire of many in his social circle who disapprove, including Noel's brother. Jean Doumanian produced the film; though it fell just shy of the critical acclaim heaped on George Washington, it still earned raves from innumerable top-tiered critics for Green's unusually mature, glistening insights into the complexities of young romantic relationships, the multilayered performances, and the director's refusal to simplify the narrative with Hollywood dramatic conventions.<

Highest Rated Movies

Filmography

MOVIES

RATING TITLE CREDIT BOX OFFICE YEAR
94% Hunter Gatherer
  • Executive Producer
2016
77% Goat
  • Screenwriter
$0.1M 2016
No Score Yet Stronger
  • Director
2016
No Score Yet Hot Sugar's Cold World
  • Producer
  • Executive Producer
2015
35% Our Brand is Crisis
  • Director
$4.9M 2015
49% Manglehorn
  • Director
  • Producer
$0.1M 2015
75% Camp X-Ray
  • Executive Producer
$0.1M 2014
81% Land Ho!
  • Executive Producer
$0.8M 2014
87% Joe
  • Producer
$0.3M 2014
82% Prince Avalanche
  • Screenwriter
  • Director
  • Producer
$0.3M 2013
No Score Yet See Girl Run
  • Executive Producer
2013
45% The Comedy
  • Executive Producer
2012
5% Nature Calls
  • Executive Producer
$0.1M 2012
89% Compliance
  • Executive Producer
$0.4M 2012
21% The Sitter
  • Director
$30.2M 2011
44% The Catechism Cataclysm
  • Producer
$0.1M 2011
27% Your Highness
  • Director
$21.6M 2011
No Score Yet Black Jack
  • Director
2011
68% Pineapple Express
  • Director
$87.4M 2008
91% Shotgun Stories
  • Producer
2007
80% Great World of Sound
  • Producer
2007
68% Snow Angels
  • Director
  • Screenwriter
$0.3M 2007
55% Undertow
  • Director
  • Screenwriter
2004
71% All the Real Girls
  • Screenwriter
  • Director
2003
No Score Yet Pleasant Grove
  • Director
2002
No Score Yet Physical Pinball
  • Director
2001
84% George Washington
  • Screenwriter
  • Producer
  • Director
2000

TV

RATING TITLE CREDIT YEAR
63% Vice Principals
2016
  • Producer
  • Executive Producer
  • 2016
79% Red Oaks
2014
  • Executive Producer
  • Creator
  • Director
  • 2016
  • 2015
  • 2014
29% Chozen
2014
  • Producer
  • Executive Producer
  • 2014
82% Eastbound & Down
2009-2013
  • Producer
  • Executive Producer
  • Director
  • 2013
  • 2012
  • 2010
  • 2009
70% Good Vibes
2011
  • Producer
  • Executive Producer
  • Creator
  • 2011

Quotes from David Gordon Green's Characters

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