Ginger Rogers

Ginger Rogers

  • Highest Rated: 100% That's Entertainment! III (1994)
  • Lowest Rated: 55% The Barkleys of Broadway (1949)
  • Birthday: Jul 16, 1911
  • Birthplace: Independence, Missouri, USA
  • In step with Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers was one half of the most legendary dancing team in film history; she was also a successful dramatic actress, even winning a Best Actress Oscar. Born Virginia McMath on July 16, 1911, in Independence, MO, as a toddler, she relocated to Hollywood with her newly divorced mother, herself a screenwriter. At the age of six, Rogers was offered a movie contract, but her mother turned it down. The family later moved to Fort Worth, where she first began appearing in area plays and musical revues. Upon winning a Charleston contest in 1926, Rogers' mother declared her ready for a professional career, and she began working the vaudeville circuit, fronting an act dubbed "Ginger and the Redheads." After marrying husband Jack Pepper in 1928, the act became "Ginger and Pepper." She soon traveled to New York as a singer with Paul Ash & His Orchestra, and upon filming the Rudy Vallee short Campus Sweethearts, she won a role in the 1929 Broadway production Top Speed.On Broadway, Rogers earned strong critical notice as well as the attention of Paramount, who cast her in 1930's Young Man of Manhattan, becoming typecast as a quick-witted flapper. Back on Broadway, she and Ethel Merman starred in Girl Crazy. Upon signing a contract with Paramount, she worked at their Astoria studio by day and returned to the stage in the evenings; under these hectic conditions she appeared in a number of films, including The Sap From Syracuse, Queen High, and Honor Among Lovers. Rogers subsequently asked to be freed of her contract, but soon signed with RKO. When her Broadway run ended, she went back to Hollywood, starring in 1931's The Tip-Off and The Suicide Fleet. When 1932's Carnival Boat failed to attract any interest, RKO dropped her and she freelanced around town, co-starring with Joe E. Brown in the comedy The Tenderfoot, followed by a thriller, The Thirteenth Guest, for Monogram. Finally, the classic 1933 musical 42nd Street poised her on the brink of stardom, and she next appeared in Warner Bros.' Gold Diggers of 1933.Rogers then returned to RKO, where she starred in Professional Sweetheart; the picture performed well enough to land her a long-term contract, and features like A Shriek in the Night and Sitting Pretty followed. RKO then cast her in the musical Flying Down to Rio, starring Delores Del Rio; however, the film was stolen by movie newcomer Astaire, fresh from Broadway. He and Rogers did not reunite until 1934's The Gay Divorcee, a major hit. Rogers resisted typecasting as strictly a musical star, and she followed with the drama Romance in Manhattan. Still, the returns from 1935's Roberta, another musical venture with Astaire, made it perfectly clear what kinds of films audiences expected Rogers to make, and although she continued tackling dramatic roles when the opportunity existed, she rose to major stardom alongside Astaire in classics like Top Hat, 1936's Follow the Fleet, Swing Time, and Shall We Dance? Even without Astaire, Rogers found success in musical vehicles, and in 1937 she and Katharine Hepburn teamed brilliantly in Stage Door.After 1938's Carefree, Rogers and Astaire combined for one final film, the following year's The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle, before splitting. She still harbored the desire to pursue a dramatic career, but first starred in an excellent comedy, Bachelor Mother. In 1940, Rogers starred as the titular Kitty Foyle, winning an Academy Award for her performance. She next appeared in the 1941 Garson Kanin comedy Tom, Dick and Harry. After starring opposite Henry Fonda in an episode of Tales of Manhattan, she signed a three-picture deal with Paramount expressly to star in the 1944 musical hit Lady in the Dark. There she also appeared in Billy Wilder's The Major and the Minor and Leo McCarey's Once Upon a Honeymoon. Rogers then made a series of films of little distinction, including 1945's Weekend at the Waldorf (for which she earned close to 300,000 dollars, making her one o

Photos

Highest Rated Movies

Filmography

Movies

Rating

Title

Credit

Box
Office

Year

No Score Yet A Night in a Dormitory Actor 2015
No Score Yet Hat Check Girl Actor 2014
No Score Yet Astaire & Rogers Ultimate Collector's Edition Actor 2006
100% That's Entertainment! III Actor 1994
No Score Yet You're the Top: The Cole Porter Story Actor 1990
No Score Yet That's Dancing! Actor 1985
No Score Yet George Stevens: A Filmmaker's Journey Herself 1984
No Score Yet Gotta Dance, Gotta Sing Actor 1984
No Score Yet Cinderella Queen 1965
No Score Yet Harlow Mama Jean 1965
No Score Yet Oh, Men! Oh, Women! Mildred Turner 1957
No Score Yet Teenage Rebel Nancy Fallon 1956
No Score Yet The First Traveling Saleslady Miss Rose Gillray 1956
No Score Yet Tight Spot Sherry Conley 1955
No Score Yet Black Widow Carlotta "Lottie" Marin 1954
No Score Yet Twist of Fate 'Johnny' Victor 1954
No Score Yet Forever Female Beatrice Page 1954
88% Monkey Business Edwina Fulton 1952
No Score Yet Dreamboat Gloria Marlowe 1952
No Score Yet We're Not Married Ramona Gladwyn 1952
No Score Yet Groom Wore Spurs, The 'A.J.' Furnival 1951
No Score Yet Storm Warning Marsha Mitchell 1951
No Score Yet Perfect Strangers Theresa (Terry) Scott 1950
55% The Barkleys of Broadway Dinah Barkley 1949
No Score Yet It Had to Be You Victoria Stafford 1947
No Score Yet Magnificent Doll Dolly Payne Madison 1946
No Score Yet Heartbeat Arlette Lafron 1946
No Score Yet Weekend at the Waldorf Irene Malvern 1945
No Score Yet I'll Be Seeing You Mary Marshall 1945
No Score Yet Lady in the Dark Liza Elliott/Boss Lady 1944
No Score Yet Tender Comrade Jo 1943
No Score Yet Tales of Manhattan Diane 1942
100% The Major and the Minor Susan Applegate 1942
No Score Yet Once Upon a Honeymoon Katie O'Hara 1942
82% Roxie Hart Roxie Hart 1942
100% Tom, Dick and Harry Janie 1941
80% Kitty Foyle Kitty Foyle 1940
No Score Yet Primrose Path Ellie May Adams 1940
No Score Yet Lucky Partners Jean Newton 1940
No Score Yet Fifth Avenue Girl Mary Grey 1939
No Score Yet Bachelor Mother Polly Parrish 1939
71% The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle Irene Castle 1939
100% Vivacious Lady Francey Brent 1938
57% Carefree Amanda Cooper 1938
No Score Yet Having Wonderful Time Thelma 'Teddy' Shaw 1938
95% Stage Door Jean Maitland 1937
89% Shall We Dance Linda Keene 1937
100% Swing Time Penelope Carrol 1936
80% Follow the Fleet Sherry Martin 1936
No Score Yet In Person Carol Corliss / aka Carol Colfax 1935
100% Top Hat Dale Tremont 1935
No Score Yet Star of Midnight Donna Mantin 1935
86% Roberta Countess Scharwenka, Lizzie Gatz 1935
No Score Yet Romance in Manhattan Sylvia Dennis 1935
100% The Gay Divorcee Mimi Glossop 1934
No Score Yet Change of Heart Madge Rountree 1934
No Score Yet Finishing School Cecilia 'Pony' Ferris 1934
No Score Yet Upper World Lilly Linda 1934
No Score Yet Twenty Million Sweethearts Peggy Cornell 1934
86% Flying Down to Rio Honey Hale 1933
No Score Yet Chance at Heaven Marjorie 'Marje' / 'Mug' Harris 1933
No Score Yet Rafter Romance Mary Carroll 1933
No Score Yet A Shriek in the Night Patricia Morgan 1933
No Score Yet Professional Sweetheart Glory Eden 1933
100% Gold Diggers of 1933 Fay Fortune 1933
96% 42nd Street Ann Lowell 1933
No Score Yet Sitting Pretty Actor 1933
No Score Yet You Said a Mouthful Alice Brandon 1932
No Score Yet The Thirteenth Guest Lela / Marie Morgan 1932
No Score Yet Carnival Boat Honey 1932
No Score Yet Hat Check Girl Jessie King 1932
No Score Yet The Tenderfoot Ruth Weston 1932
No Score Yet The Tip Off Baby Face 1931

TV

Rating

Title

Credit

Year

No Score Yet American Masters
2001
Appearing

QUOTES FROM Ginger Rogers CHARACTERS

Jean Maitland
Psst! Pardon me, thereâ??s a dust storm blowing up. (affectedly) Howjado.
Jean Maitland
Psst! Pardon me, there's a dust storm blowing up. [affectedly] Howjado.
Linda Shaw
(flaunting her sable coat) Have we met socially?
Linda Shaw
[flaunting her sable coat] Have we met socially?
Jean Maitland
I hope not â?? (taking in coat) A very nifty piece of jack- rabbit you have there.
Jean Maitland
I hope not. [taking in coat] A very nifty piece of jack- rabbit you have there.
Linda Shaw
Just a little trinket my Aunt Susan gave me.
Jean Maitland
I think itâ??s terribly unselfish of these little animals to give up their lives to keep other animals warm.
Jean Maitland
I think it's terribly unselfish of these little animals to give up their lives to keep other animals warm.
Linda Shaw
Theyâ??re very smart little animals. They never make sacrifices for the wrong people.
Linda Shaw
They're very smart little animals. They never make sacrifices for the wrong people.
Judy Canfield
If you werenâ??t so snooty you could have had a date with me tonight.
Judy Canfield
If you weren't so snooty you could have had a date with me tonight.
Jean Maitland
You can have my share of those timber wolves.
Judy Canfield
They may be timber wolves to you, but theyâ??re meat and potatoes to me.
Judy Canfield
They may be timber wolves to you, but they're meat and potatoes to me.
Jean Maitland
Donâ??t you know any younger men?
Jean Maitland
Don't you know any younger men?
Judy Canfield
Iâ??m tired of buying dinners for younger men.
Judy Canfield
I'm tired of buying dinners for younger men.
Jean Maitland
Do you mind if I ask you a personal question?
Terry Randall
Another one?
Jean Maitland
Are those trunks full of bodies?
Terry Randall
(indicating trunks on either side of open one) Just thoseâ??but I donâ??t intend to unpack them.
Terry Randall
[indicating trunks on either side of open one] Just those but I don't intend to unpack them.
Jean Maitland
I was just thinking if the room got too crowded, we could live in the trunks.
Jean Maitland
When does your baggage get here? (It already fills the room)
Jean Maitland
When does your baggage get here? [It already fills the room]
Terry Randall
(opening one of several trunks) Iâ??m expecting the bulk of it in the morning.
Terry Randall
[opening one of several trunks] I'm expecting the bulk of it in the morning.
Jean Maitland
We could leave the trunks here and sleep in the hall. Thereâ??s no use crowding the trunks.
Jean Maitland
We could leave the trunks here and sleep in the hall. There's no use crowding the trunks.
Terry Randall
(taking out furs) I donâ??t know what weâ??re going to do when the wolf hounds arriveâ??I hope you donâ??t mind animals. (tosses fur on bed)
Terry Randall
[taking out furs] I don't know what we're going to do when the wolf hounds arrive. I hope you don't mind animals. [tosses fur on bed]
Jean Maitland
(picking up fur) Oh, not at all. Iâ??ve roomed with a great many of them before.
Jean Maitland
[picking up fur] Oh, not at all. I've roomed with a great many of them before.
Terry Randall
Yes, I can see that. (as she unpacks fur coat)
Terry Randall
Yes, I can see that. [as she unpacks fur coat]
Jean Maitland
(smelling the fur she picked up) Fresh killed?
Jean Maitland
[smelling the fur she picked up] Fresh killed?
Terry Randall
Yes, I trapped them myself.
Penelope "Penny" Carrol
Your RIGHT foot!
John "Lucky" Garnett
Sorry, I'm left handed.