Celebrity Photo

Lee Richardson

  • Highest Rated: 92% Network (1976)
  • Lowest Rated: 23% A Stranger Among Us (1992)
  • Birthday: Sep 11, 1926
  • Birthplace: Not Available
  • Chicago-born Lee Richardson was a nondescript but extremely busy character actor. His stock-in-trade was well-heeled authority, in such films as Brubaker (1980), Prizzi's Honor (1985; as Dominic Prizzi) and Amazing Grace and Chuck (1987). The longest lasting of his many TV assignments was the role of Captain Jim Swanson on the CBS daytime drama The Guiding Light. One of Lee Richardson's most widely seen films was one in which he was seen not once: Richardson was the offscreen narrator of the 1976 media satire Network.

Highest Rated Movies

Filmography

Movies

Rating

Title

Credit

Box
Office

Year

88% Truman Franklin Roosevelt 1995
No Score Yet Skylark Chub 1993
57% The Cemetery Club Actor 1993
23% A Stranger Among Us Rebbe 1992
No Score Yet With Murder in Mind John Condon 1992
56% The Exorcist III University President 1990
87% Q & A Leo Bloomenfeld 1990
27% The Fly II Anton Bartok 1989
No Score Yet Tiger Warsaw Michael Warsaw 1988
No Score Yet Laura Lansing Slept Here Larry Baumgartner 1988
35% The Believers Dennis Maslow 1987
No Score Yet Sweet Lorraine Sam 1987
29% Amazing Grace and Chuck Jeffries 1987
86% Prizzi's Honor Dominic Prizzi 1985
No Score Yet Doubletake Jim Hart 1985
No Score Yet I Am the Cheese Grey 1983
43% Daniel Jack Fein 1983
91% Prince of the City Sam Heinsdorff 1981
75% Brubaker Warden Renfrew 1980
92% Network Narrator 1976
No Score Yet Middle of the Night Joey, Lockman's Son 1959

TV

Rating

Title

Credit

Year

No Score Yet Law & Order
1990-2010
Le Claire Mike Le Claire
  • 1991
No Score Yet Kate & Allie
1984-1989
Teacher
  • 1985

QUOTES FROM Lee Richardson CHARACTERS

Narrator
That evening, Howard Beale went on the air to preach the corporate cosmology of Arthur Jensen.
Narrator
This story is about Howard Beale, who was the news anchorman on UBS TV. In his time, Howard Beale had been a mandarin of television, the grand old man of news, with a HUT rating of 16 and a 28 audience share. In 1969, however, his fortunes began to decline. He fell to a 22 share. The following year, his wife died, and he was left a childless widower with an 8 rating and a 12 share. He became morose and isolated, began to drink heavily, and on September 22, 1975, he was fired, effective in two weeks. The news was broken to him by Max Schumacher, who was the president of the news division at UBS. The two old friends got properly pissed.
Narrator
This was the story of Howard Beale. The first known case of someone being killed for bad ratings
Narrator
This was the story of Howard Beale. The first known case of someone being killed for bad ratings.
Anton Bartok
Bleurrg!
Narrator
This was the story of Howard Beale: The first known instance of a man who was killed because he had lousy ratings.