Alan Zilberman Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Alan Zilberman

Alan Zilberman
Alan Zilberman's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Washington Post, Washington City Paper, Brightest Young Things

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
4.5/5 96% Black Panther (2018) Like T'Challa's step toward becoming a world leader, Black Panther shows the next generation of comic book films how it's done. ‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2018
3/4 70% Double Lover (L'amant double) (2018) Nothing about this film feels remotely safe.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
3.5/5 100% 2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts - Animation (2018) What makes this crop interesting is that they include one of the best nominees in recent years, and one of the most terrible.‐ Brightest Young Things
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2018
92% A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer fant├ística) (2018) This film is a straightforward drama-with flourishes of surreal imagery-that's anchored by a star-making performance. You cannot take your eyes off Daniela Vega, and you may get the sense she does not want you to.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Feb 8, 2018
2.5/5 89% The Insult (L'insulte) (2018) This is a film with its heart in the right place, to the point it has little balance elsewhere.‐ Brightest Young Things
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2018
83% Vazante (2018) Some scenes are languid, while others are seemingly pointless, yet they culminate toward a final shot as striking and powerful as anything in the usual crop of Oscar bait.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2018
2.5/5 72% Mom and Dad (2018) The film's smart ideas give way to something typical. And up until now, "typical" is a word the filmmaker managed to avoid.‐ Brightest Young Things
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2018
2/4 84% The Final Year (2018) "The Final Year" teeters toward insight, only to turn its attention to personalities.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Jan 18, 2018
4.5/5 92% The Shape of Water (2017) I suspect that many audiences may cringe at this film, or possibly be repulsed by it, but those who accept its weird premise will have their hearts and imaginations plucked.‐ Brightest Young Things
Read More | Posted Jan 16, 2018
2.5/5 77% All the Money in the World (2017) The trouble is that Plummer's performance, which is unapologetic and deliciously mean, overshadows all the others. ‐ Brightest Young Things
Read More | Posted Jan 16, 2018
4/5 88% The Post (2018) Spielberg's latest works as entertainment, but he not so secretly wants the audience to run from the theaters and donate to the ACLU.‐ Brightest Young Things
Read More | Posted Jan 16, 2018
4/5 91% Phantom Thread (2018) How Alma and Woodcock find harmony is fascinating, even a little odd, since they avoid the typical path of a couple in love. ‐ Brightest Young Things
Read More | Posted Jan 16, 2018
96% Call Me by Your Name (2018) A lot of Call Me By Your Name has a hazy, meandering quality to it. In its final moments, as summer draws to a close, Ivory's script and the performances shift into sharp focus. ‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Dec 14, 2017
91% The Disaster Artist (2017) Given his own failed attempts at becoming an auteur, it is all too perfect that James Franco finally finds his muse, successfully humanizing one of cinema's few genuine eccentrics.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2017
97% Coco (2017) Coco is an improvement, drawing upon magic realism and dizzying technical detail to create an immersive entertainment that never condescends to its audience.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2017
100% The Farthest (2017) Ultimately, The Farthest is a traditional documentary, brimming with detail and entertainment, and Reynolds does not even need to include Neil Degrasse Tyson's shtick. ‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2017
100% The Work (2017) It has a remarkable premise. ‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2017
40% Justice League (2017) To its detriment, Justice League constantly invites comparisons to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. If Snyder's latest inspires any passion, it will be among the tiresome, inevitable squabbling between DC vs. Marvel fanboys.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2017
3.5/4 100% No Greater Love (2017) "No Greater Love" gets at the camaraderie - and the contradictions - of military service in a way that few films ever have.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Nov 9, 2017
79% The Killing of a Sacred Deer (2017) The Killing of a Sacred Deer is a pitiless film, with director Yorgos Lanthimos making absurdly high demands for anyone who dares buy a ticket. There is a brazen absence of logic, with slow-burn horror as its only replacement.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Oct 26, 2017
3/4 77% Thank You for Your Service (2017) "Service" is flawed only because the demands of narrative cinema require an ending, while recovery, at least in the real world, is a lifelong process.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Oct 26, 2017
2/4 66% Breathe (2017) If its subject were around to see this film, would he appreciate the tender care that his son obviously took in making it? Or might he be annoyed to have so little attention paid to what he himself was thinking?‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2017
96% The Florida Project (2017) The Florida Project is not just a downer, although parts of it are harrowing. The young lead actors are funny and vivacious, speaking with unaffected charisma and honesty.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Oct 12, 2017
3/4 83% Marshall (2017) By avoiding his most famous case, while at the same time preserving history - and adding pulpy thrills - "Marshall" is more involving than any textbook or documentary could be.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Oct 12, 2017
87% Blade Runner 2049 (2017) Directed with more style than substance by Denis Villeneuve, Blade Runner 2049 improves upon the original film, even if it cannot capture what made it so special.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Oct 5, 2017
63% Manolo, The Boy Who Made Shoes For Lizards (2017) The Boy Who Made Shoes for Lizards is so adoringly created, so utterly absent of anything resembling an investigative thought, that the film's shoddy construction creates an opportunity for unfair demands. ‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
2.5/4 20% Woodshock (2017) Defiantly inscrutable, "Woodshock" can test a viewer's patience, yet the filmmakers' consistent self-confidence creates an alluring, oddly hypnotic effect.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
2/4 50% Shot (2017) "Shot" would have you believe there's a moral to this fable. But suggesting that the solution to the problem of gun violence is as simple as one of Aesop's fables only adds insult to injury.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Sep 21, 2017
3.5/4 96% Ex Libris: New York Public Library (2017) This is slow, almost languid filmmaking, yet it's a delight to watch the countless ways in which the library is still capable of lifting us.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Sep 21, 2017
69% mother! (2017) Parts of mother! are maddening, even obtuse, and yet Aronofsky plays it fair.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Sep 15, 2017
2/4 83% The Villainess (Ak-Nyeo) (2017) "The Villainess" is little more than an action showcase, with way more scenes of turgid espionage than thrilling set pieces. It's for genre die-hards, not a general audience.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
85% It (2017) But for all its shocking imagery, IT is more successful as a coming-of-age story-aided by a talented cast of unknowns-with the monster serving as a stand-in for our collective loss of innocence.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Sep 7, 2017
90% Marjorie Prime (2017) Marjorie Prime will undoubtedly mean something specific to everyone who sees it.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Sep 1, 2017
90% RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World (2017) Rumble may repeat a lot of what you already know, especially if you own The Last Waltz or any film about music in the 1960s. Still, there is a welcome earnestness here, celebrating tunes you should probably listen to again, anyway.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Aug 24, 2017
3/4 98% In This Corner of the World (Kono sekai no katasumi ni) (2017) "Corner" is a deeply sympathetic tale, using the possibilities of animation not just to pique curiosity, but to devastate.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2017
87% Wind River (2017) This is not thriller that raises social awareness; it's another white savior fantasy, just in the package of a grim procedural.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
3.5/4 97% Menashe (2017) In scene after scene, "Menashe" strikes complex notes without telegraphing how the audience should feel.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
1/4 32% From the Land of the Moon (Mal de pierres) (2017) Moments of visual beauty only call attention to the stilted dialogue and maudlin plot that otherwise define the film.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Aug 3, 2017
77% Atomic Blonde (2017) Atomic Blonde can be meandering, sometimes indulgent, yet its infrequent strong scenes overpower the weak ones.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2017
3/4 59% Strange Weather (2017) "Strange Weather" is wise about loss, showing the ripple effects of an untimely death. It is hardly an original concept, yet it handles this subject with the care and integrity it deserves.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Jul 27, 2017
92% Dunkirk (2017) On top of the non-stop action, Nolan succeeds by acknowledging weak spots that have plagued his entire career. Instead of improving on these weaknesses, he crafted a film that has no need for them.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jul 21, 2017
96% The B-Side: Elsa Dorfman's Portrait Photography (2017) Directed by famed documentarian Errol Morris, The B-Side: Elsa Dorfman's Portrait Photography is a perfect match of filmmaker and subject.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2017
2/4 59% Marie Curie: The Courage of Knowledge (2017) Noelle fills the story with passion, debate and human contradiction. If the material ultimately eludes the director's grasp, wandering off on unfocused tangents, it's because of its ambition.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Jul 13, 2017
86% Moka (2017) There is a dearth of curiosity here, so instead of a dramatic thriller, Moka is a mirthless revenge tale that defaults toward drama.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jul 7, 2017
93% Baby Driver (2017) This is the rare, unique entertainment that takes classic action tropes, and turbocharges them.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jun 30, 2017
2/4 70% Moscow Never Sleeps (2017) O'Reilly's ambitions notwithstanding, "Moscow" is uneven because of the inescapable nature of such interlocking narratives: some land better than others.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2017
88% It Comes At Night (2017) After the success of recent low-budget horror films like Split and Get Out, It Comes at Night is far more demanding, even brazen.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jun 9, 2017
2.5/4 93% Stefan Zweig: Farewell to Europe (2017) As Zweig, Hader never offers a note of regret or terror. Instead, his performance is mannered and steadfast, evoking a man who trusts that humanity will survive fascism.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
92% Wonder Woman (2017) With a story that moves at a steady clip and action that threads the needle between realism and supernatural exaggeration, Wonder Woman is the arrival of a hero for all of us, but young women in particular.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2017
1.5/4 49% Churchill (2017) Biography, at its most useful, disabuses us from myth, but "Churchill" has no such ambitions. As both history and entertainment, it's a drag.‐ Washington Post
Read More | Posted Jun 1, 2017