Alexandra Zawia Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Alexandra Zawia

Alexandra Zawia
Alexandra Zawia's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Cinema Scope

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
86% Night Moves (2014) This is Eisenberg's most introspective performance to date, and taking cues from his performance, the film unfolds with a steady, measured pace.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
85% Joe (2014) Any good stuff is counteracted by the redundant and pointless miserablism of the whole exercise: drifting awkwardly between several genres, from coming-of-age story to comedy to melodrama.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
97% We Are the Best! (2014) The film becomes a funny and amiable chronicle of female friendship, capturing the wide range of emotions from sky-highs to world-ending lows, from trust to betrayal and the inevitable making-up.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
96% Gravity (2013) Whatever is achieved here visually is never really matched by a profound narrative.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
81% Why Don't You Play in Hell? (2014) In those moments that Why Don't You Play in Hell? lacks substance-which are numerous-Sono turns this into a virtue. He reminds us that cinema is at its most pleasurable when it touches something deep inside.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
89% Amour Fou (2015) Hausner is very skilled at bringing out the ambiguities of her material, and keeps shifting the tone towards sardonic humour.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
100% Mula sa kung ano ang noon (From What Is Before) (2014) From What Is Before is a striking example of Slow Cinema: over the course of 338 minutes, Diaz creates a narrative in two parts, with the country's historical cataclysms haunting the events of the first half and culminating in the second.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
No Score Yet Los Hongos (2014) Los Hongos is too aimless to really leave its own mark.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017