Amber Wilkinson Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Amber Wilkinson

Amber Wilkinson
Tomatometer-approved critic

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3.5/5 78% Beirut (2018) The plotting, though not without cliche, retains a satisfying robust quality - dense enough to keep you intrigued without becoming overwrought.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Apr 20, 2018
4/5 100% Puzzle (2018) As with a jigsaw puzzle, the overall picture may look familiar, but there's a real sense that craftsmanship has gone in to making sure each of the pieces fit satisfyingly together.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2018
5/5 100% The Tale (2018) The film is, necessarily, shocking but Fox handles what must have been difficult emotional material for her in a cool and responsible way that makes the message she delivers all the more devastating.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2018
4/5 No Score Yet Butterflies (Kelebekler) (2018) Turkish director Tolga Karaçelik shows a fine ear for family dynamics as well as a joyously off-the-wall sense of humour that ensures even though we've taken similar movie road trips in the past, this one feels fresh.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2018
3.5/5 No Score Yet The Interpreter (Tlmočník) (2018) For the most part this is a lyrical and lightly handled odd couple road movie that achieves a subtle resonance, although it is almost scuppered by a sudden major tonal shift in the film's final act.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2018
2/5 No Score Yet Modern Life Is Rubbish (2018) While the flashback element of the film is solidly worked, the dialogue is clunky to the point where the romantic moments sound like a cliche-swapping contest, rather than heartfelt emotions. ‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2018
4/5 No Score Yet The Poetess (2017) Brockhaus and Wolff include extensive interviews with Hilal, reflecting on the competition, also following her and her daughters as they prepare to attend a family wedding, which gives a broader snapshot of the social fabric of their homeland.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Apr 2, 2018
4/5 No Score Yet Men Don't Cry (2017) There are a lot of characters, but they gradually flow together to build a fractured patchwork of what it means to be a veteran of messy conflict on any side.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Apr 2, 2018
4/5 No Score Yet The Blessed (Les bienheureux) (2017) Djama immediately captures the sense of old friendships and the way that 'jokes' can carry sentiment that's serious as a heart attack underneath.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Mar 29, 2018
3/5 No Score Yet Until the Birds Return (En attendant les hirondelles) (2017) Like so many anthology films, it suffers from the fact that the sections are uneven, with the middle segment soaring high above the two bookend stories.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2018
4.5/5 No Score Yet Taste of Cement (2017) When the sound arrives it is intense, the noise of construction and the unmistakable clatter of war, acting along with heartbreaking visuals of the aftermath of a bombing, as an attack on the senses after the quietude of what has gone before. ‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2018
4.5/5 90% The Third Murder (Sandome no satsujin) (2017) The lightness of touch so evident in his family films is no less deft here, as he woos us with the promise of cast iron fact.... only to spend the rest of the film oiling the ground beneath our beliefs until they can't stop sliding this way and that. ‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2018
3.5/5 73% Nancy (2018) An intense character study in triplicate, made gripping both by the deliberately ambiguous way in which Christina Choe approaches everyone's mental state and by the performances.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2018
3/5 85% The Miseducation of Cameron Post (2018) While the characters are well drawn and the script gently amusing, it is also on the preachy side for adults - although young LGBTQ audiences certainly deserve the same sort of heroes and heroines that the straight kids have been indulged with for years‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Mar 9, 2018
4/5 97% Leaning Into the Wind (2018) [Thomas] Riedelsheimer also has an artist's eye and approach, so this is less a recording of [Andy] Goldsworthy than a dialogue between his work and that of the filmmaker. ‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Mar 7, 2018
4/5 93% Three Identical Strangers (2018) The surprises just keep coming in Tim Wardle's documentary, which starts in the realm of the remarkable and is likely to leave jaws dropped by record proportions by the time the credits roll.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Mar 5, 2018
4/5 100% Watu Wote (All of Us) (2017) Benrath does an excellent job of building tension in double-quick time, also finding room for other, less easily evoked emotions, such as regret and doubt.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Mar 1, 2018
4/5 100% My Nephew Emmett (2017) The writer/director achieves impressively high production values for his short and is clearly a man who knows how to surround himself with additional talent.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Mar 1, 2018
4/5 100% The Silent Child (2017) The filmmakers do not want you to feel good after this short, they want you to think.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 28, 2018
4/5 92% Madeline's Madeline (2018) This is a woozily shot, dislocating experience that in its best moments generates the sort of tense mental anxiety that Lynne Ramsay has made her calling card.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 25, 2018
4/5 80% Eldorado (2018) Imhoof opens the debate out to consider the unsavoury economics of the situation, with the personal touchstone ensuring that his film retains a character of its own that marks it out from others on the same subject. ‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 24, 2018
4/5 82% A Ciambra (2018) Carpignano is interested in the margins - and the fringes of those margins.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2018
3.5/5 89% The Insult (L'insulte) (2018) Ziad Doueiri's latest film shows how the embers of history can stay warm for a long time, easily flaring up under the right circumstances - even those that seem innocuous.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2018
3.5/5 60% Pig (The Pig) (2018) There is satire here but this the director takes a jokes first, social comment second approach.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2018
3/5 79% Unsane (2018) That the biggest surprise of the film is not a plot point at all but the appearance of someone famous in a cameo role, speaks volumes.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2018
3.5/5 83% 3/4 (2017) Director Ilian Metev wants our focus on the family physics. ‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2018
4.5/5 87% You Were Never Really Here (2018) Nothing plays out as you expect, with Ramsay maintaining an unsettling staccato that keeps both the action and the viewer on edge. ‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
3.5/5 74% Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot (2018) It's hard to be tough on a film with a spirit as warm-hearted as this - like Callahan, it's trying hard even when it fails.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
2.5/5 59% Juliet, Naked (2018) The title might sound risque but the end product is as safe, cosy and unoriginal as a Now That's What I Call Music Christmas gift.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 8, 2018
3.5/5 94% Loveless (Nelyubov) (2018) Though the filmmaking is good, the bleakness of the message is unremitting. ‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 8, 2018
4/5 86% The Divine Order (Die göttliche Ordnung) (2017) Leuenberger makes Nora's gradual awakening to gender issues feel like the sun coming out on a dreary day, brimful of unexpected warmth.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2018
3/5 64% The Happy Prince (2018) A mixed bag, as while Everett the actor masterfully evokes the mournful mix of decadence and decay of the last years of Wilde, Everett the filmmaker is, like so many before him, too much in love with the brilliant old rogue for his own good.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2018
4/5 No Score Yet Kailash (2018) Although Satyarthi's dedication and achievements speak for themselves, this is not a glossy hagiography, largely because he himself is acutely aware of the sacrifices made by his own family for the greater good.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2018
4/5 74% In the Fade (Aus dem Nichts) (2017) Akin asks us to shift our perceptions of terrorist attacks in deliberately provocative ways, constantly flipping what we think we know and what we expect to see right up until the film's haunting final image.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2018
4.5/5 99% Faces Places (Visages, villages) (2017) Whether she is probing at the ideas of the ties that bind us to a home or considering the morality of goat horns, she constantly nudges us to move around and, perhaps, get a better view.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2018
4/5 100% The Prince of Nothingwood (2017) Even if the facts are fiction, you still get the sense of a man who is driven, at least in part, by an urge to bring some sort of happiness by shooting film rather than bullets.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2018
3/5 82% Lu Over the Wall (Yoake tsugeru Rû no uta) (2018) There's no doubt that youngsters will enjoy the trippy and exuberant visuals of this film.. although whether the youngest audience members will have the staying power for the almost two-hour running time is another question. ‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2018
3.5/5 71% This is Home: A Refugee Story (2018) It is Shiva's lightness of touch that sells the film. Just as she lets the politics of the situation show through by examining their impact, her unobtrusive, observational style also helps the families feel free to recount their stories of trauma.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2018
4/5 100% Colette (2018) Keira Knightley slips effortlessly into the evolution of Colette...‐ Times (UK)
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2018
4/5 No Score Yet Of Fathers and Sons (2017) What makes the film all the more poignant is the fact that the children are, of course, despite all this, like kids anywhere else.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2018
4/5 100% I Am Not a Witch (2017) The bobbins are a brilliantly employed metaphor, something that feels freshly sprung from a fairy tale, only silly until you consider how sinister they are.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2018
3/5 64% Our New President (2018) Pozdorovkin isn't trying to present new information here and there is very little context provided, but it is not so much what is being shown as the sheer weight of material.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2018
4.5/5 88% Loveling (Benzinho) (2018) Teles runs the gamut of emotions. We don't need to hear her discuss how she is feeling, we can see it written on her face.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2018
3.5/5 82% Monsters and Men (2018) With a philosophical framework that asks us to consider the bigger picture, Green's film shows that the loaded system is as much of a threat to minority communities as a loaded gun.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2018
3.5/5 No Score Yet Pikadero (2015) [Ben] Sharrock also shows a Aki Kaurismäki-like interest in colour. Blues, whites and yellows dominate in a way that helps this slight but enjoyable story come pleasingly together, while he also shares the Finnish director's interest in societal issues. ‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2018
3.5/5 No Score Yet Salyut-7 (2017) It's fascinating to see the usual Ground Control US politics switched out for Russian concerns.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Dec 16, 2017
4.5/5 No Score Yet Diamonds of the Night (Démanty noci) (1964) Not just specifically about the Second World War, Nemec's film still has resonance today as a broader allegory for the politics of power and the often belligerent attitude of the old towards the young.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2017
4/5 No Score Yet Toyen (2013) [Nemec] doesn't lead us through Toyen's life by the hand but by the emotion.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Nov 7, 2017
3.5/5 57% Murder On The Orient Express (2017) If Ustinov emphasised the humour of Poirot and Suchet the meticulousness, Branagh manages to bridge the two, while also bringing an unexpected note of soulfulness and melancholy to his performance.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Nov 3, 2017
3.5/5 93% Thelma (2017) Thelma appears coolly aloof on the surface, but her constant choice of statement lipsticks, despite her otherwise conservative dress code, hints at the emotions screaming from within.‐ Eye for Film
Read More | Posted Nov 1, 2017