Andrea Gronvall Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Andrea Gronvall

Andrea Gronvall
Andrea Gronvall's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Chicago Reader, Time Out

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
89% Girls Trip (2017) Bridesmaids proved that women could be just as smutty onscreen as men, but this fast-paced comedy is ruder, cruder, funnier, and more explicit.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jul 20, 2017
20% Wish Upon (2017) This horror flick is so predictable it feels not raw but antiseptic.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jul 13, 2017
94% Baby Driver (2017) Oozing menace as addicted bank robbers, Jamie Foxx and Jon Hamm are all the more charismatic thanks to Bill Pope's luscious noir photography. Credit Jonathan Amos and Paul Machliss for the razor-sharp editing.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2017
53% 47 Meters Down (2017) The only thing this so-called thriller has going for it is widescreen cinematography by Mark Silk.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017
95% The Women's Balcony (Ismach Hatani) (2017) With an eye for artful detail, director Emil Ben-Shimon orchestrates a resolution both plausible and jubilant.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2017
43% Family Life (Vida de Familia) (2017) Nudity and scenes of energetic lovemaking spice up the meager narrative but can't make up for a flat ending.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
83% Megan Leavey (2017) This is an affecting story about loyalty, sacrifice, and the forging of identity.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
16% The Mummy (2017) How fitting that the makers of this action-adventure movie about tomb raiders plunder the Universal Pictures vault, from the 1932 and 1999 versions of The Mummy to An American Werewolf in London and the Abbott and Costello monster fests.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
19% Baywatch (2017) Who'd have thought a flimsy, witless TV series like Baywatch could have spawned this boisterous, cheeky comedy?‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted May 25, 2017
1/4 48% Paris Can Wait (Bonjour Anne) (2017) This is nothing but a vanity project, relying on the conceit that Anne has been unfairly languishing in her husband's shadow. Eleanor Coppola must have made many sacrifices for her husband's art, but with Paris Can Wait the sacrifice is all ours.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted May 18, 2017
28% King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword (2017) After directing a number of British crime comedies, Guy Ritchie applied his rapid-fire wisecracks, gleeful violence, and flashy cutting and camera moves to the Sherlock Holmes franchise; that same method works well for this big-budget Arthurian legend.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted May 11, 2017
No Score Yet Between Land and Sea (2016) The character's scenes with his mother (Vicky Hernandez) and the next-door-neighbor he adores (Viviana Serna) are engrossing in their unfussy realism, as Cruz...uses the tiniest of movements to suggest the red-blooded man trapped inside the infirm body. ‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2017
No Score Yet The Projects (Danchi) (2016) The movie's high point is an inventive sequence inside a massive UFO... The sequence reflects a traditional Japanese reverence for nature, and it helps compensate for the claustrophobic early scenes.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2017
85% Mr. Gaga: A True Story of Love and Dance (2017) Naharin's style is both idiosyncratic and accessible, his movements both angular and supple, but above all his dances celebrate the body, built for the joy of motion.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Mar 31, 2017
90% Frantz (2017) This sublime mature work by François Ozon borrows liberally from Ernst Lubitsch's Broken Lullaby (1932) but supplants its fevered melodrama with erotically charged mystery.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Mar 16, 2017
62% Slack Bay (Ma loute) (2017) Cannibalism may not be everyone's idea of funny, but French director Bruno Dumont (L'Humanité, Hadewijch) elevates it to ghoulish camp in this slapstick skewering of the French bourgeoisie.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Mar 9, 2017
No Score Yet Cock and Bull (2016) Cao may not have Tarantino's bravura, but he does have his own style and attitude, conveyed in inventive low-angle shots and snide jabs at modern-day robber barons.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Mar 9, 2017
88% Apprentice (2017) Benoit Soler's fluid, revolving camera frequently visualizes what the main character can't verbalize, and writer-director Boo Junfeng treats his thorny topic with sensitivity, but the pat ending is a letdown. ‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 27, 2017
No Score Yet Daughter (Dokhtar) (2016) [Cinematographer Hamid Khozouie Abyane] brings to his widescreen images an array of vivid colors and patterns, an architectural sense of composition, and a feel for climate and terrain.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2017
10% Fifty Shades Darker (2017) Other than Dornan's exceptional physique, the movie offers little gratification, delayed or otherwise.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2017
100% 2017 Oscar Nominated Shorts: Documentary (2017) The strongest entry this year is Orlando von Einsiedel's British short The White Helmets.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2017
No Score Yet Breath (2017) An unsentimental perspective distinguishes this 2016 Iranian drama from earlier youth-centered classics.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2017
94% Hunter Gatherer (2016) By turns whimsical and touching.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2017
No Score Yet We Are One (I Am You) (2017) Originally titled I Am You, this documentary stresses our connection to each other and the planet, though director Kevin Mukherji undermines his theme with sloppy methodology and lazy thinking.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2017
54% The Ardennes (D'Ardennen) (2017) Amid the plot twists lies a tricky conundrum about the relative culpability of miscreants and their enablers.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2017
No Score Yet Little Wound's Warriors (2017) McClellan sticks largely to close-ups, letting the students weigh in on subjects from tribal culture to dysfunctional parents, from school spirit to suicide. Stunning aerial shots of the Badlands help illustrate how the Lakota find renewal and purpose.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2017
83% Lost And Beautiful (Bella e Perduta) (2016) Picturesque but somber.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2017
87% A Monster Calls (2017) Rich in folkloric symbolism, this fantasy from director J.A. Bayona starts promisingly but eventually sinks under a wave of pop psychology.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jan 5, 2017
81% Mifune: The Last Samurai (2016) This concise documentary focuses largely on his artistic partnership with Akira Kurosawa but includes enough about Japan's film industry and the star's charmed life to engross fans and casual viewers alike.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jan 5, 2017
100% Homo Sapiens (2016) Geyrhalter piques the imagination with images of decay: towns, malls, theaters, and hospitals, all deserted, unnamed, and overrun by foliage and wildlife.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jan 5, 2017
85% Lion (2016) Garth Davis uses close-ups sparingly and hits no false notes; cinematographer Greig Fraser creates a child's perspective by setting the camera at the hero's eye level and conveys the grandeur of India through sweeping panoramic and overhead shots.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Dec 22, 2016
18% Assassin's Creed (2016) Sci-fi fantasy meets pseudo history in this ill-conceived adaptation of a popular video game series.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Dec 21, 2016
73% Sing (2016) The plot may be shopworn, with not much aimed at adults, but the film's message that collaboration can reap greater rewards than competition is appropriate for all ages.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Dec 21, 2016
13% Collateral Beauty (2016) The premise stretches credulity even before the actors start giving the conspirators personal advice that sounds suspiciously otherworldly.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2016
71% Coming Through The Rye (2016) The film's send-up of youthful obsession is sweet and funny, and its depiction of first love and buried pain is moving.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2016
71% Bleed For This (2016) The familiar conventions of the boxing movie get a muscular overhaul in this gritty biopic about Vinny Pazienza, known as the Pazmanian Devil.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Nov 17, 2016
45% Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk (2016) [Suffers from an] uneven tone, inelegant editing, and scattered narrative.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Nov 17, 2016
49% Almost Christmas (2016) Holiday movies about dysfunctional families are reassuring because their batty characters make our own relatives look harmless by comparison; this seasonal comedy delivers those tidings of comfort if not always joy.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Nov 10, 2016
94% Miss Hokusai (Sarusuberi: Miss Hokusai) (2016) Director Keiichi Hara achieves a balance between earthiness and aestheticism, suggesting a Japan on the cusp of modernity.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Oct 20, 2016
No Score Yet The View from Tall (2015) This Chicago-set love story breaks new ground with the protagonist's self-knowledge and directness.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2016
No Score Yet Hurricane Bianca (2016) Crowd-funded on a teensy budget, the movie is not without its charms, including Ryan Matthieu Smith's inventive production and costume design and a cast of unknowns who prove worthy straight men to Del Rio.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2016
63% The Magnificent Seven (2016) Director Antoine Fuqua proves that the western is far from dead with this rousing update of John Sturges's 1960 classic (itself adapted from Akira Kurosawa's The Seven Samurai).‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2016
95% Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise (2016) As this spirited documentary shows, the rise of poet, author, and activist Maya Angelou was anything but meteoric.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 15, 2016
95% Kaili Blues (Lu Bian Ye Can) (2016) Bi Gan directed this boldly original debut feature.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2016
No Score Yet Down There (Là-bas) (2006) The movie is striking but reveals more about the filmmaker's fragile state of mind than about the milieu. ‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2016
No Score Yet Le dos rouge (Portrait of the Artist) (2015) A major narrative thread (the filmmaker's mysterious rash) isn't adequately explored, leaving underdeveloped the links between hysteria, madness, and creativity.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jul 21, 2016
96% Nuts! (2016) I can't imagine anyone believing that goat glands transplanted into human reproductive organs could cure impotence, but as this lively, offbeat documentary proves, plenty of Americans did.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2016
79% Wedding Doll (Hatuna Meniyar) (2016) Writer-director Nitzan Giladi understands the myriad reactions of "normal" people to the developmentally disabled but betrays his heroine with a condescending scene in which she dons a bridal gown made of toilet paper rolls. ‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jun 30, 2016
No Score Yet Terre battue (2014) Director Stéphane Demoustier sets this 2014 domestic drama in his hometown of Lille, a historic French textile center, and it bustles with energy. ‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jun 30, 2016
77% The Shallows (2016) This is silly stuff but often genuinely scary, with excellent aerial and undersea photography and some persuasive special effects. ‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jun 23, 2016