Angelo Muredda Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Angelo Muredda

Angelo Muredda
Angelo Muredda's reviews do not count toward the Tomatometer. This is not a Tomatometer-approved critic, and this critic's reviews are not published on a Tomatometer-approved publication.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
73% Young & Beautiful (Jeune Et Jolie) (2014) François Ozon's Young & Beautiful is an accomplished trifle.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
81% Don Jon (2013) Gordon-Levitt's more modest aims help the last act's moralizing go down smoother than Steve McQueen's tongue-clucking opus, but only just.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
No Score Yet Empire of Dirt (2013) Empire of Dirt is a too-neatly structured look at a couple of First Nations mother-daughter pairs coping with traumas both fresh and ancestral, whose descent into Canadian storytelling clichés is so pronounced.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
21% An Eye for Beauty (Le règne de la beauté) (2014) Unable to muster much in the way of tension, thanks to that napkin doodle of a plot and a pair of sublimely wooden lead performances, Arcand shoots for the moral complexity of Éric Rohmer and ends up with lesser Gabriele Muccino.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
76% Kill Your Darlings (2013) As with a lot of weak movies about writers, this one relies on hyper-cranked montages of coiffed artistes clacking away at typewriters and throwing pages in the air while hoofing their drugs of choice. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
97% It Follows (2015) It Follows still impresses as a savvy but sincere exercise in sustained tension-building and release-more of a machine than a film, maybe, but a finely wrought one.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
94% Whiplash (2014) Chazelle has a winning conceit in the bond between the self-annihilating hero and his psychopathic mentor, wringing surprising tension out of an improbable magic-realist finale that sees the men hashing out their demonic teacher-student relationship.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
79% The Theory of Everything (2014) Too bad, then, about the film's utterly standard progression, its insistence on tracing Hawking's ascension to the height of pop science, as if becoming a windbag lecturer on Big Ideas is all a great mind-and his partner-could ask for in life.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
100% Tu Dors Nicole (2015) Though she's ultimately the second star after her director-who, from the tidy visual design to the odd soundscape, creates an almost annoyingly hermetic world-it's Côté that lets the whole thing breathe.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
92% Birdman (2014) For all its carping about the virtues of unfettered creativity, Birdman is little more than a rote confirmation of what middlebrow artists and prestige-charmed critics already believe.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
95% 20,000 Days on Earth (2014) There's an ambition to Forsyth and Pollard's work that's hard to deny, as well as a refreshingly quixotic commitment to tweaking the generic conventions of the promotional piece they're making.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
93% Force Majeure (2014) What sets Force Majeure apart is this heightened sensitivity to how even an event as minor as Ebba's little breather is incongruous with the stories that families tell about who they are.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
99% Timbuktu (2015) Structural neatness is not simply an interpretive shortcut, but a token of Sissako's adroitness at pivoting between individual dramas and the overarching social and political systems to which they are so inextricably bound.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
88% The Lobster (2016) The trouble lies in the film's noncommittal tone, which too often deviates from Lanthimos' reliable deadpan. Set against the earlier films' prickliness, The Lobster seems oddly ingratiating.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
No Score Yet A Heavy Heart (Herbert) (2015) There's something refreshing, too, in Stuber's emphasis on the livable monotony of Herbert's daily routines once his illness sets in, a still-too-rare depiction of disability as a continuous state.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
78% How Heavy This Hammer (2015) In just two features and several shorts, co-conceived with producing partner Dan Montgomery, Radwanski has proven himself a gentler, Southern Ontarian answer to Dardennes-style social realism.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
No Score Yet Eva Doesn't Sleep (Eva No Duerme) (2015) It's a relatively fresh conceit, but the assorted set pieces vary too much-not just in terms of aesthetics and length, but of quality-for it to pay off as well as Agüero intends.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
100% Al Purdy Was Here (2015) The mostly assured trafficking between a chronicle of Purdy's career and an assessment of his literary and familial legacy is the film's main strength, but also something of a liability.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
97% 45 Years (2015) 45 Years may be annoyingly precise in its execution, but it's nuanced enough that it doesn't always matter, skillfully evoking literary antecedents like James Joyce's The Dead and Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway without being too fussy about it.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
94% Room (2015) Room is a surprisingly uneasy affair, split between an ugly start that points to uplifting things to come, and a restorative coda that stubbornly forecloses as much as it promises comfort.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
87% The Untamed (La región salvaje) (2017) Escalante's dogged literal-mindedness makes this an incomplete Zulawski homage at best, and at worst The Untamed is as basic as its title, a joyless slog through an austere sci-fi-adjacent melodrama about the weaponization of desires unexpressed.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
100% Window Horses (2017) Rosie's belated search for her father is affecting but in the end too familiar, and the film's insistence upon her preciousness grows tiring in light of the more devastating personal and political stories unfolding all around her.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
98% Moonlight (2016) As a melancholy character piece about an inarticulate young man who can't quite become himself no matter how many permutations of his image he puts out into the world, this is strong stuff.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
40% Unless (2016) Failing to articulate the feminist argument that sets the novel apart, if anything does, Gilsenan is instead doggedly loyal to Shields' worst impulses.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
95% Manchester by the Sea (2016) The prickly warmth, specificity, and gallows humour that is Lonergan's stock in trade is gradually diluted by the generic mechanics of an important prestige picture.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2017
81% Mean Dreams (2017) Familiarity doesn't always yield tedium, but it's hard to muster much enthusiasm for Mean Dreams' sleepy regionalist remix of genre tropes and images.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2017
95% The Handmaiden (Ah-ga-ssi) (2016) Park's compromise-a tastefully arranged melodrama with elements of kitsch-is as incoherent as it is fetching.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2017
No Score Yet Layla M. (2016) There's a believable, shopworn naturalism to the performances, and a particular spontaneity and vibrancy to El Koussour.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2017
66% Free Fire (2017) Wheatley is as dryly funny as he is comfortable at making immaculately framed urban gothic paintings out of the dirt and debris of a ruined warehouse.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2017
89% Thelma (2017) Joachim Trier makes a sterling if somewhat noncommittal bid for post-horror with Thelma, a slow-burn supernatural thriller.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2017
50% A Worthy Companion (2017) The cast can't elevate this thinly sketched and ultimately insulting material.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2017
No Score Yet Porcupine Lake (2017) Amidst the more refined naturalistic photography and tighter-than-usual plotting, it's this emotional acuity that makes Porcupine Lake instantly recognizable as Veninger's work.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2017
96% Stronger (2017) As a procedural about the work required to come back into one's body after a major physical and psychic trauma, Stronger is surprisingly compelling. It does well by its subject's non-hysterical response to his new life post-injury.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2017
65% Breathe (2017) Serkis decently apes Anthony Minghella's historical-romance aesthetic in the film's early stretches, but can't find a unique angle on this well-trod material, distinguishing himself mostly with questionable stylistic quirks.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2017
98% Call Me by Your Name (2017) [Call me By Your Name] gracefully weaves an examination of internalized homophobia and anti-Semitism, among other things, into its slow-burn romance.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2017
2.5/4 81% Brad's Status (2017) [Mike] White has an undeniable knack for creating self-loathing narrators whose innate humanism has curdled into jealousy.‐ Film Freak Central
Read More | Posted Sep 21, 2017
3/4 95% The Florida Project (2017) When Florida Project works, it works beautifully, but one never quite shakes the nagging feeling that this insistence on finding joy and momentary pleasure amidst hopelessness is the province of storytellers more privileged than their precarious subjects.‐ Film Freak Central
Read More | Posted Sep 21, 2017
1.5/4 95% Molly's Game (2017) You can thank anyone who came out of Steve Jobs yearning for Aaron Sorkin's take on a sociopathic female protagonist with quixotic interests for Molly's Game, the loquacious screenwriter/producer/playwright's rancid directorial debut. ‐ Film Freak Central
Read More | Posted Sep 21, 2017