Ann Ross

Ann Ross
Ann Ross's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Maclean's Magazine
Publications: Maclean's Magazine

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
No Score Yet The Farmer Takes a Wife (1935) The story in general noses along at canal-barge pace, leaving you al! the time in the world to take a rest and enjoy the scenery. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2019
No Score Yet A Lost Lady (1934) It seems a pity to waste a fine actor like Frank Morgan on such a picture. But feeling the way I do about Miss Stanwyck, it didn't seem below her talents. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2019
No Score Yet Her Jungle Love (1938) Her Jungle Love is smash hokum, with one huge "effect" piled on another. But it's entertaining as spectacle, and as wild comedy played straight. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2019
No Score Yet Wife, Doctor and Nurse (1937) Wife, Doctor and Nurse, though it arrives rather late in the field, is a good deal more entertaining than most pictures of its kind. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2019
No Score Yet Kentucky Moonshine (1938) The Ritz Brothers seem to be proof that if you try hard enough you can be funny. By sheer terrific effort you can wear an audience dowm till it gives in and laughs its head off. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2019
No Score Yet In Person (1935) it's fairly lively but I still prefer Ginger Rogers with Fred Astaire or without George Brent; preferably with Fred Astaire. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
94% Alice Adams (1935) Miss [Katharine] Hepburn's performance is brilliant though uneven; a little overwrought at times, but so penetrating at others that every third woman, perhaps even every second one, in the audience will recognize herself in some aspect of Alice. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Woman Wanted (1935) Woman Wanted, though a programme picture with no particular build-up, is much livelier entertainment than many more pretentious films. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Curly Top (1935) Admirers of the screen's first child wonder will dote on Curly Top. People who find that all child performances on the screen, even Temple performances, stir up the wicked old Herod in them, had better stay away. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
80% The Merry Widow (1934) Everybody's old favorite brought strictly up to date by Ernst Lubitsch, and very brightly acted, danced and sung by Maurice Chevalier and Jeannette MacDonald. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
100% The Gay Divorcee (1934) Though it's longer than it should be, it seems shorter than it actually is, thanks to Fred Astaire. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
100% It's a Gift (1934) It is true Mr. Fields repeats himself a great deal in his new picture It's a Gift, but, even so, W. C. Fields repeating himself is usually a lot fresher than an ordinary comedian thinking up something suddenly for the first time. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Limehouse Blues (1934) George Raft seemed very unhappy in the role. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Caravan (1934) It's a tuneful picture, with some pretty photography. But it takes time, takes time. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet College Rhythm (1934) College Rhythm brings Joe Penner, radio star, to the screen, and Joe Penner works furiously, with a duck, at being funny. The duck, I thought, was a little bit funny. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Of Human Hearts (1938) Of Human Hearts starts off extremely well... But once the son grows up and goes off to the Civil War, the story falls apart disastrously. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Till We Meet Again (1936) Till We Meet Again isn't one of the more memorable spy pictures; it's a little slow in getting started, and rather involved without being very ingenious. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet The First Hundred Years (1938) That familiar problem - a woman's marriage vs. her career - gets another thorough workout in The First Hundred Years. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Good Old Soak (1937) Una Merkel, Ted Healy and a comedy parrot supply the humor. It's fairly amusing. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Sailing Along (1938) Pleasant songs and lively dancing help to make up for a routine plot and occasional moments when the picture moves at much the rate of the heroine's barge. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Wide Open Faces (1938) The result is mostly noise, slapstick, chase sequences, and many many close-ups of Joe E. Brown's wide-open face. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet The Bride Wore Red (1937) [Joan Crawford's] problem is always the same - she has to get herself married to one of two dazzling screen heroes. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet The Golden Arrow (1936) It's fair comedy, thanks largely to Bette Davis's gay and sparkling performance as the cold-cream heiress. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Trouble for Two (1936) If you want romantic adventure but don't want to get all worked up in the warm weather, Trouble for Two is fair enough entertainment. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Bullets or Ballots (1936) Most of the material is familiar, however: it's just the usual crime angles sorted out into a new pattern. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Private Number (1936) The chief point of interest in the picture, in fact, is the description it supplies of kitchen fascism in the homes of the terribly rich. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Dancing Pirate (1936) As sight and sound it is excellent, but unfortunately it developed plot trouble early in the picture and wandered off into a long complicated narrative. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
100% Fury (1936) A bitterly effective picture. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet There's Always a Woman (1938) A murder mystery with lively dialogue, plenty of excitement, and a plot that moves almost as fast as Miss Blondell. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet White Banners (1938) It takes a good deal of explanation to cover this situation, but it is worked out smoothly, and eventually everything comes out sunny side up. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet This'll Make You Whistle (1936) Apart from the lyrics, which are tuneful and fresh, This'll Make You Whistle seems to depend for its comedy mostly on violence, exaggeration and the impact of practical jokes. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Fifty Roads to Town (1937) Most of the situations and all the characters in Fifty Roads to Town have been seen before on the screen, but the director has recombined them with a speed and variety that helps to make up for their lack of originality. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Her Husband Lies (1937) Her Husband Lies is good, smoothly turned out melodrama and the acting is competent, though not poignant enough to make the sad ending important one way or the other. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Wake Up and Live (1937) It is expertly put together... sharply timed and brilliantly performed, especially by Jack Haley. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Talk of the Devil (1936) When English thrillers are at their best - that is when they're directed by Alfred Hitchcock - they're the most exciting films made anywhere. When they aren't, they tend to be awkwardly managed, plodding affairs like [Talk of the Devil]. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Mad Holiday (1936) It's one of those murder mysteries that seem to be put together on the theory that if you confuse your audience sufficiently they won't notice the absence of a plot. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
No Score Yet Yellow Jack (1938) As a whole... Yellow Jack is a fine worthwhile picture that just misses being a great one. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 10, 2019
No Score Yet Port of Seven Seas (1938) Movie-goers who like to settle down quietly and take things as they come will enjoy Port of Seven Seas. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 10, 2019
50% Four Men and a Prayer (1938) There are startling shots of revolution and sudden death, but the story is confused and jumpy. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
No Score Yet Kidnapped (1938) Kidnapped is fair historical melodrama, but the original Stevenson parts that survive seem to show that Robert Louis Stevenson could write better for the screen than four Hollywood writers put together. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
No Score Yet Woman Chases Man (1937) None of Woman Chases Man makes much sense, but it's often very bright in a deranged sort of way. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
No Score Yet Black Legion (1937) A pretty grim study of human society, which adults will find authentic, deplorable and well worthy of their attention. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
100% Make Way for Tomorrow (1937) An exceptionally fine picture, honest and sensitive and beautifully acted, especially by Victor Moore and Beulah Bondi. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
100% Way Out West (1937) People who laugh at Laurel and Hardy will have lots of fun at Way Out West. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
No Score Yet Penitentiary (1938) The final impression left by Penitentiary is that life in prison isn't much fun, and pictures about life in prison aren't much fun either. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
No Score Yet A Girl of the Limberlost (1934) I'm afraid I can't trust myself to speak about The Girl of the Limberlost, except to say that it follows faithfully the girlhood classic; which seems, in fact, to be chiefly what is the matter with it. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
No Score Yet Forbidden Territory (1934) Forbidden Territory is exciting, preposterous, but as fine entertainment as anyone could ask for. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
No Score Yet Loves of a Dictator (1935) It features Clive Brook, whose talents, though hardly flashy enough for dictatorship, are dependable and authoritative. It is excellent textbook entertainment. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
No Score Yet Going Highbrow (1935) Going Highbrow is the sort of picture that is used apparently to clean up a lot of odds and ends of contracts and story rights, and give the younger directorial boys a chance to try their hands. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
No Score Yet Confession (1937) If the role of the unhappy Russian opera star in Confession is intended as a consolation prize to the star for losing the Grand Duchess Tatiana part in Tovarich, I'm afraid it won't do much to take her mind off her grievance. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019