Anne Billson Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Anne Billson

Anne Billson
Anne Billson's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Daily Telegraph (UK), The Arts Desk

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
85% La tête en friche (My Afternoons with Margueritte) (2011) Margueritte is played by Gisèle Casadesus, a spry and still beautiful 96-year-old veteran... and one of the pleasures of Becker's film is being able to feast your eyes on a face like hers, which has an entire lifetime etched into its lines.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
81% Disneynature Oceans (2010) By mixing the fake with the genuine, however well-meaning their intentions, they've shot themselves in the foot; I left the cinema feeling as though I'd been taken for a ride.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
82% Bakjwi (Thirst) (2009) The broad humour ends up undercutting the potential poignancy of the ending... Never mind, because it's not every day you see two vampires locked in such a colourful apache dance of destruction, filmed with such aplomb.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
48% The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) I'm many decades older and several broken hearts' worth more cynical than the Twilight saga's target audience, but it does seem to me to be nothing less than emo-porn for teenage girls.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
83% Wake Wood (2009) Wake Wood is the latest evidence that new-model Hammer is harking back to a less atrocity-driven style of horror, built on an accumulation of creepy atmosphere rather than the systematic subjection of disposable teenagers to gruesome ordeals.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
70% Black Death (2011) I'll wager grown-ups will be duly horrified by it. Not because of the gore -- although it does have a fair amount of that -- but because it takes you on a real journey into the heart of darkness, and you might not like what you find there.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
28% The Twilight Saga: New Moon (2009) The film's saving grace, by a long chalk, is Kristen Stewart, who once again manages to make the insufferable Bella far more interesting on the screen than she is on the page.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
73% The Road (2009) I'm not asking for the end of the world to be a thrill-ride, but maybe it could have been less of a meretricious trudge.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
73% Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life (2011) Sfar is helped no end by an astonishing performance from Eric Elmosnino, who also performs many of the songs on the soundtrack.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
86% Farewell (L'affaire Farewell) (2010) Carion's film covers an astonishing amount of geographical and narrative ground and juggles three languages -- Russian, French and English -- but never loses its way.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
44% The Box (2009) Just as we begin to twig what's going on, the plot wriggles out of Kelly's grip altogether and veers off into the overstretched delirium of all ambitious but immature directors.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
44% Jennifer's Body (2009) A lover's tryst turns to carnage! A catfight between chicks in prom dresses in a swimming-pool! Set-pieces like these should be a slam-dunk, even shot in Vancouver on a low budget, but Kusama fumbles them all.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
88% Let Me In (2010) Let Me In is not so much a film in its own right as a watered-down digest for Anglophones too stupid or too lazy to read subtitles.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
48% Colin (2009) Where the film scores is in its moments of simplicity. This isn't another smirking Z-budget spoof, but has the confidence to take itself seriously (though there are some nice odd touches of humour).‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
5/5 97% A Prophet (Un prophete) (2010) The director uses gritty in-your-face close-ups to immerse us in the daily routine of prison existence, which, like all minutely observed routines, is utterly compelling.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
75% El Día de la bestia (The Day of the Beast) (1999) This second feature by naughty Spanish director Alex de la Iglesia turns out to be a splendidly blasphemous horror-comedy about nothing less than the birth of the Antichrist.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
14% Feeling Minnesota (1996) Steven Baigelman, who wrote and directed, aims for offbeat, flippant Tarantino-esque lowlife kicks but misses the mark on every count, having no feel for characters, plot, action or dialogue.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
63% Home for the Holidays (1995) Single mom Holly Hunter is fired from her job at a Chicago museum on the very day she is due to fly back to Baltimore to cope with nutty parents, loony aunt, wacky gay brother and boring sister. That's it -- that's the plot. Read it and weep.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
16% Jingle All the Way (1997) The film is very loud, and festooned with the sort of comic violence far more disturbing than anything in an 18-rated movie.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
14% August (1996) There's a lot of hysterical shouting and some irrelevant stuff about an accident in a nearby quarry, and you end up wishing the main characters would stop moaning and, for once, just go ahead and kill themselves.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
95% The Secret of Roan Inish (1995) I wish I liked it more, but there's more than whiff of worthy Irish heritage in the air, and the story drifts all over the place. I'm afraid I kept drifting off as well.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
20% The Stupids (1996) It's so screamingly unfunny it verges on the surreal.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
63% Independence Day (1996) It may be film-making by numbers, but the numbers are the right ones, and they fall into place with a satisfying clunk. This is everything a blockbuster should be.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
65% The Perez Family (1995) With non-Hispanic principal actors and Indian-born Mira Nair directing, this garish romance is a bit of an ethnic pot-pourri, but it's not quite as annoying as it sounds. Huston, in particular, gives it a touch of genuine class.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
53% Original Gangstas (1996) This is solid action fare with saggy bits, but there's enough ass-kicking, Molotov cocktail-throwing and gunfire to keep their erstwhile fans amused, and the screenplay cleverly knits the old traditions of Shaft together with Boyz 'n' the Hood.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
63% The Last Supper (1996) This impressive debut feature by Stacy Title has its wobbly technical moments and one or two underdeveloped narrative strands, but it's brimful of provocative ideas and moral dilemmas as well as being extremely funny.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
36% Eraser (1996) The stunts, even show-stopping ones such as our man throwing himself out of a plane without a parachute and landing on a car without sustaining injury, have an air of desperation about them.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
15% Boys (1996) Stacy Cochran wrote and directed and I fell asleep.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2017
50% Phenomenon (1996) This so-so Capra-esque fable with undertones of L. Ron Hubbard takes a turn for the worse after the first hour.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2017
53% Stealing Beauty (1996) Is there not something a little disturbing about the way in which ageing male film-makers are applauded for their ogling of actresses young enough to be their granddaughters?‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2017
3/5 No Score Yet The Borrowers (2011) The casting gimmick here was Stephen Fry as the villainous zoologist.... It was a welcome touch of eccentricity in a production which sacrificed the story's charm in its quest for action.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2017
2/5 30% Rogue Trader (1999) Unfortunately James Dearden, who wrote and directed Rogue Trader, ignores all the enticing genre possibilities and turns out a plodding biopic, featuring a central character with all the depth of the despicable yuppie from the Audi commercial.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2015
91% Reservoir Dogs (1992) Perhaps it's a bit too knowing in places, and perhaps it packs in one pop cultural reference too many, but this is an in-your-face, look-at-me kind of debut, designed to function as the calling-card of a major new talent.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Dec 29, 2014