Anthony Lane Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Anthony Lane

Anthony Lane
Anthony Lane's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New Yorker

Movie Reviews Only

|
Showing 1 - 50 of 674
Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
60%

Allied (2016)

"Zemeckis ... seems uncertain whether to treat the tale as a wrenching saga of split loyalties or as a glamorous jaunt. Having gathered all the ingredients for derring-do, he forgets to turn up the heat, and the derring never does." ‐New Yorker
Posted Nov 28, 2016
85%

Jackie (2016)

"I happen to find the result intrusive, presumptuous, and often absurd, but, for anyone who thinks that all formality is a front, and that the only point of a façade is that it should crack, "Jackie" delivers a gratifying thrill." ‐New Yorker
Posted Nov 28, 2016
75%

The Eyes of My Mother (2016)

"The movie, for all its physicality, shrivels up at the slightest touch of logic. All of which, to be fair, is likely to lure rather than to repel any Poe-steeped addicts of horror ..." ‐New Yorker
Posted Nov 28, 2016
97%

Manchester by the Sea (2016)

"If you feel ashamed to be laughing, then Lonergan has got you exactly where he wants you-stirred and confounded, casting around for breaks in the cloud of sadness." ‐New Yorker
Posted Nov 21, 2016
76%

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2016)

"In all, the movie is a cunning and peppy surprise, dulled only by the news that no less than four sequels await." ‐New Yorker
Posted Nov 21, 2016
80%

Lion (2016)

"Davis's film is based on a true story; though wrenching, there is barely enough of it to fill the dramatic space, and the second half is a slow and muted affair after the Dickensian punch of the first." ‐New Yorker
Posted Nov 21, 2016
88%

Elle (2016)

"The question of whether "Elle" is pernicious nonsense or an excruciating black comedy is brushed aside in Huppert's demonstration of sangfroid." ‐New Yorker
Posted Nov 14, 2016
72%

Nocturnal Animals (2016)

"I felt sorry for Gyllenhaal, berated in both his personae for being weak, and for Adams, strapped and laced into a role that scarcely lets her breathe." ‐New Yorker
Posted Nov 14, 2016
93%

Arrival (2016)

"So sure is the stride of the narrative, and so bracing the air of expectation, that you feel yourself, like Louise, beginning to spin, and barely able to catch your breath." ‐New Yorker
Posted Nov 7, 2016
89%

Loving (2016)

"Just as she holds the family together, so Negga possesses the film, and you can't stop looking at her eyes." ‐New Yorker
Posted Oct 31, 2016
86%

Hacksaw Ridge (2016)

"The result, though corny at times, treads close to madness and majesty alike, and nobody but Gibson could have made it." ‐New Yorker
Posted Oct 31, 2016
84%

Christine (2016)

"Striding through this, and commanding almost every scene, is Rebecca Hall, who earns our sympathy, as the best actors do, by steeling herself not to plead for it." ‐New Yorker
Posted Oct 17, 2016
94%

The Handmaiden (Ah-ga-ssi) (2016)

"The secret of the film, I suspect, is its love of secrets. The men and women guard their stratagems like jewels, and their lusts like hidden fires." ‐New Yorker
Posted Oct 17, 2016
98%

Under The Shadow (2016)

"Did you honestly doubt that peeling duct tape and a sheet of printed fabric, if handled with imaginative brio, could be as frightening as any ten-million-dollar monster? O ye of little faith." ‐New Yorker
Posted Oct 10, 2016
44%

The Girl on the Train (2016)

"Nothing is duller or more stifling, as a rule, than people who wish to make it perfectly plain how stifled they feel by their dull suburban existence." ‐New Yorker
Posted Oct 10, 2016
81%

American Honey (2016)

"Arnold's very strength-the mashup of grime and epiphany-is in danger of becoming a shtick." ‐New Yorker
Posted Oct 3, 2016
84%

Deepwater Horizon (2016)

"In short, Peter Berg has done it again. You come out shaken with excitement, but with a touch of shame, too, at being so easily thrilled." ‐New Yorker
Posted Oct 3, 2016
63%

The Magnificent Seven (2016)

"Traces of real history are hard to spot in Fuqua's Western, but there isn't much evidence of a real Western, either. You sense that an entire genre, far from being revitalized, is being plundered for handy tips." ‐New Yorker
Posted Sep 23, 2016
77%

Goat (2016)

"If you are college-bound, go and see Goat first, but for God's sake don't take your parents. " ‐New Yorker
Posted Sep 23, 2016
77%

Bridget Jones's Baby (2016)

"So reliably does she embarrass herself at every public event that the film, trudging by on automatic, becomes an embarrassment, too." ‐New Yorker
Posted Sep 19, 2016
95%

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years (2016)

"The Beatles now belong to an honored past, stuck there like an obelisk, and yet here they are, alive-busting out all over, time and time again. Yeah, yeah, yeah." ‐New Yorker
Posted Sep 19, 2016
33%

Max Rose (2016)

"Noah takes a fatal decision to trade snap for mush, and the movie only stirs in the final twenty minutes ..." ‐New Yorker
Posted Sep 5, 2016
59%

The Light Between Oceans (2016)

"Stand back from this fable and examine it for logic, and you see how nonsensical it is." ‐New Yorker
Posted Sep 5, 2016
88%

Mia Madre (2016)

"Everything in "Mia Madre"-happenings, memories, and idle fancies-feels deftly interleaved." ‐New Yorker
Posted Aug 22, 2016
92%

Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World (2016)

"The shape of things to come is a subject very dear to the hearts of the high-tech evangelists Herzog talks to, and it accounts for the pulse of freakish comedy that beats through "Lo and Behold."" ‐New Yorker
Posted Aug 22, 2016
89%

Morris from America (2016)

"This represents the first non-comic leading role for Robinson (moviegoers will know him from "Pineapple Express" and "Hot Tub Time Machine," among other films), and he commands it with a gruff and amiable ease." ‐New Yorker
Posted Aug 15, 2016
87%

Florence Foster Jenkins (2016)

"Streep is right there, solidly invested in the folly of Florence's dreams. When she declares that "music has been, and is, my life," you believe her." ‐New Yorker
Posted Aug 15, 2016
26%

Suicide Squad (2016)

"To say that the movie loses the plot would not be strictly accurate, for that would imply that there was a plot to lose." ‐New Yorker
Posted Aug 8, 2016
98%

Little Men (2016)

"The best reason to watch "Little Men" is Michael Barbieri, who musters a blend of soulfulness and aggression that would be remarkable at any age. The danger for any Sachs movie is that its humane quietude could slide into dullness. Not with this boy ..." ‐New Yorker
Posted Aug 1, 2016
56%

Jason Bourne (2016)

"Greengrass is as dexterous as ever, yet the result, though abounding in thrills, seems oddly stifled by self-consciousness and, dare one say, superfluous." ‐New Yorker
Posted Aug 1, 2016
82%

Indignation (2016)

"This is the first movie [Schamus] has directed, and the rhythm of the storytelling feels careful and courteous to a fault. Yet Marcus's plight is genuinely grave, and Schamus sets up delicate visual rhymes that are not in Roth." ‐New Yorker
Posted Jul 22, 2016
84%

Star Trek Beyond (2016)

"It's not just a blast but, at moments, a thing of beauty, alive to the comic awesomeness of being lost in space." ‐New Yorker
Posted Jul 22, 2016
60%

Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie (2016)

"To transform a TV series into a film is to surround yourself with pitfalls, and "Absolutely Fabulous," sad to report, nosedives into every one of them." ‐New Yorker
Posted Jul 18, 2016
72%

Ghostbusters (2016)

"So, how do the Ghostbusters of today shape up against the boys of yesteryear? Pretty well ..." ‐New Yorker
Posted Jul 18, 2016
93%

Life, Animated (2016)

"Owen has made immense progress, to which "Life, Animated" is a stirring tribute, yet it leaves a trail of questions unanswered or unasked." ‐New Yorker
Posted Jul 5, 2016
70%

Café Society (2016)

"There is a gravity to it, and a tug of sadness, that cannot be accounted for by the story." ‐New Yorker
Posted Jul 5, 2016
93%

Our Little Sister (Umimachi Diary) (2016)

"Nobody could describe the movie as eventful (and viewers may be surprised to learn that it's adapted from a graphic novel), yet the thrust of Kore-eda's storytelling, as so often, is that even a quiet life can be a full one." ‐New Yorker
Posted Jul 5, 2016
71%

Our Kind of Traitor (2016)

"The whole film is oddly poised between the pensive and the peevish, with a topdressing of high jinks." ‐New Yorker
Posted Jun 27, 2016
31%

Independence Day: Resurgence (2016)

"The first "Independence Day" had the gratifying slap of good pop cinema, harmless and weightless; the follow-up is twice as big and half as fun." ‐New Yorker
Posted Jun 27, 2016
55%

The Neon Demon (2016)

"Prettiness and brutality both seep from the pores of the movie." ‐New Yorker
Posted Jun 20, 2016
76%

Wiener-Dog (2016)

"Solondz's creatures feel caged and cramped by their everyday plights, and their dialogue is drained of zing." ‐New Yorker
Posted Jun 20, 2016
80%

The Conjuring 2 (2016)

"[Wan's] framing of the scares is artfully managed, and it is the accomplished Wolfe, rather than any monster, who takes true possession of the tale." ‐New Yorker
Posted Jun 20, 2016
28%

Warcraft (2016)

"Crowded and scattershot." ‐New Yorker
Posted Jun 13, 2016
96%

De Palma (2016)

"Alluringly smooth and uncluttered, as if taking its cue from one of the tracking shots so beloved by its subject." ‐New Yorker
Posted Jun 13, 2016
92%

The Nice Guys (2016)

"Why see this film? Partly because of the leading men, but mainly because of a girl." ‐New Yorker
Posted May 20, 2016
98%

Love & Friendship (2016)

"For the most part ... "Love & Friendship" is a frolic: crisp and closeted rather than expansive, with curt exchanges in drawing rooms, carriages, and gardens." ‐New Yorker
Posted May 16, 2016
90%

Captain America: Civil War (2016)

"The motto of the directors, Anthony and Joe Russo, appears to be: If you can make it happen, do it. Don't hold back." ‐New Yorker
Posted May 9, 2016
90%

The Lobster (2016)

""The Lobster" is more than a satire on the dating game. It digs deeper, needling at the status of our most tender emotions." ‐New Yorker
Posted May 9, 2016
62%

The Man Who Knew Infinity (2016)

""The Man Who Knew Infinity," based on Kanigel's book, and directed by Matthew Brown, feels sluggish and stuck, and it hits an insoluble crux." ‐New Yorker
Posted May 2, 2016
90%

A Bigger Splash (2016)

"Luca Guadagnino has made something rare and disconcerting: a genuinely pagan film." ‐New Yorker
Posted May 2, 2016
|
Showing 1 - 50 of 674