Anwen Crawford Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Anwen Crawford

Anwen Crawford
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Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3/5 88% You Were Never Really Here (2018) You Were Never Really Here feels much more remote and unreal in its scenario, and though it has been compared several times already to Martin Scorsese's Taxi Driver (1976), I'm not sure that the comparison holds weight.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Sep 5, 2018
5/5 95% BlacKkKlansman (2018) Some viewers may feel that Lee is being didactic, or literal, but I think that BlacKkKlansman is a vital film arriving at a critical moment.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Aug 15, 2018
88% Whitney (2018) Musical history is the film's weak spot and the consequence of that, despite Macdonald's clear affection for his subject, is to underplay Houston's impact by depriving her artistry of its proper context. ‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Aug 2, 2018
3/5 85% Disobedience (2018) Lelio's real strength is as a director of actors... Both Weisz and McAdams are committed and convincing. ‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2018
68% Ocean's 8 (2018) The script is woeful: eight leading parts and not a single memorable character; every actor squandered.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2018
5/5 98% BPM (Beats Per Minute) (120 battements par minute) (2017) As the film moves fluidly between protests, meetings, club nights, and affairs...we are left with the impression of a time and a place in which nothing, not even death, seems inevitable.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted May 17, 2018
4/5 94% Loveless (Nelyubov) (2018) Something vital, his films intimates, has been lost in Russia, and perhaps not only in Russia - some warmth of the soul, a sense of civic accountability. As with the child, no one even noticed it slipping away.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Apr 25, 2018
3.5/5 96% The Death of Stalin (2018) The Death of Stalin is obviously a farce, in the best sense; the primary aim is never verisimilitude. The film shares something of the attitude and atmosphere that pervades a work like Dario Fo's.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2018
4.5/5 99% Lady Bird (2017) First time writer-director Greta Gerwig, an experienced actor, is attuned to the mix of munificence and selfishness that makes up the adolescent heart.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Feb 14, 2018
3/5 79% The Killing of a Sacred Deer (2017) The emotional stakes are lowered in Lanthimos's world, but the operation of power is much the same as it ever was.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2017
4/5 97% Love & Friendship (2016) Love and Friendship is very funny, funnier still for its absence of moral reckoning.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
2/5 59% High-Rise (2016) High-Rise has no shortage of vivid images to tempt the eager filmmaker, from a ransacked supermarket to an Afghan hound floating dead in a swimming pool. What's harder to convey is that distinctive Ballardian tone. ‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
3.5/5 84% A United Kingdom (2017) Though A United Kingdom has an emotional arc that is too predictable, its resurrection of a widely forgotten piece of twentieth-century history is worthy.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
4.5/5 95% Manchester by the Sea (2016) [Michelle] Williams has only a few scenes but makes her mark in all of them.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
1.5/5 73% Berlin Syndrome (2017) The naïveté of the main character feels far less credible.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
4/5 100% Things to Come (L'avenir) (2016) Things to Come is a rare and welcome film for not suggesting that a woman is unnatural or unfeeling to care for her work as much as for her family. ‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
3.5/5 91% A Quiet Passion (2017) A Quiet Passion, like most films about writers, sticks to the life that can be dramatised, rather than the writing process, which can't.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
4/5 99% God's Own Country (2017) [Francis] Lee allows more optimism into his film, including the suggestion that agriculture itself might still have a future in England.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
96% A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night deftly mixes genre tropes while creating its own singular, surreal universe. I've never seen another a film where a female vampire dressed in a chador rides a skateboard, that's for sure.‐ Kill Your Darlings
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
99% Selma (2015) Selma gives back to the Civil Rights movement its urgent and motivating anger, when too often the movement has been misrepresented as a cause of infinitely patient, infinitely forbearing martyrs. ‐ Kill Your Darlings
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
97% Sherpa (2015) In [Jennifer] Peedom's film we see a mountain that is both workplace and sacred site, integral to both the economic livelihood and the religious beliefs of the surrounding Sherpa community.‐ Kill Your Darlings
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
92% The Gift (2015) The Gift is efficiently and quite memorably chilling.‐ Kill Your Darlings
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
79% Macbeth (2015) This is a Macbeth that retains Shakespeare's language but makes free and easy with edits, rearrangements, and a few bold reinterpretations of key scenes.‐ Kill Your Darlings
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
89% A Most Violent Year (2015) A Most Violent Year is uneven in pace and tone, as events threaten to erupt and then simmer down again, but despite its flaws, it lingers in the mind.‐ Kill Your Darlings
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
99% Shaun the Sheep Movie (2015) Borrow a young relative for cover if you must, but believe me, you are not too cool for a kid's movie when it's this much fun.‐ Kill Your Darlings
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
97% It Follows (2015) It Follows is unnerving without being bloody, and more than this, that it cleverly inverts the sexual politics on which so much popular culture, most especially the horror film, often depends.‐ Kill Your Darlings
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
99% Bill Cunningham New York (2011) New Yorkers love nothing more than a story about themselves.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
97% Spotlight (2015) If there is any heroism in Spotlight then it's a very humble one: the heroism of getting the facts right, which seems, today, almost too much to ask of mainstream newspapers.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
73% Suffragette (2015) The bravery and the radicalism was real. I wish, though, that the film itself was a little braver, a little more visceral.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
63% Spectre (2015) Spectre is an elaborate justification for the relevance of the gun-toting, martini-drinking spy in a post-Snowden world.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
88% What Happened, Miss Simone? (2015) Though it is doubtful that [Nina] Simone, were she still alive, would be much impressed with [Kanye] West's music - she once said that she didn't like rap at 'all' - she might recognise in him a fellow spirit.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
84% While We're Young (2015) It's a worthwhile field of enquiry, made into a strangely self-satisfied film.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
83% Listen Up Philip (2014) Listen Up Philip [is] an uneven mixture of satire and homage. ‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
83% Dior and I (2015) It celebrates Simons' vision, but, more interestingly, also reveals to viewers the busy, hierarchical world of the atelier, where dozens of highly skilled craftspeople, headed by a workshop première, labour for long hours on a collection.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
92% Pride (2014) The film hits some obvious notes, and some sentimental ones, but it also surprises‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
97% Two Days, One Night (2014) What the film and its characters convey to us, cumulatively, is a struggle for and towards dignity.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
87% Gone Girl (2014) Gone Girl fails as a crime thriller in part because it is far too long - none of Fincher's major feature films have clocked in at less than two hours, and several run closer to three - but mostly because the distribution of its sympathies are so uneven.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
91% Locke (2014) Tom Hardy gives a bravura performance. ‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
72% Felony (2014) Felony is too close to generic; another story about gruff Australian coppers, and god knows we've had plenty of those. As the moral stakes increased for Mal and his colleagues I found it difficult to care, because I felt as if I'd seen it all before‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
97% Boyhood (2014) Boyhood never allows itself to be trivial - we never see anyone buying groceries, or picking their nose, or spending their days tied to a job they don't enjoy. It's a film that's being celebrated as a triumph of realism, but it isn't like real life at all‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
94% Snowpiercer (2014) Violence always involves moral questions, and the decision whether to take up armed struggle lies at the heart of revolutionary movements, but the film does not take these concerns at all seriously. ‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
94% All Is Lost (2013) All Is Lost is a testament to the possibilities of digital cinema: a film like this, shot in such close confines, simply couldn't be made with anything other than lightweight, handheld cameras. ‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
76% Noah (2014) Why craft a subtle emotional cue when, with overpowering string instruments and the ubiquitous sonic boom, you can prevent an audience from thinking at all?‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
91% The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) [Wes Anderson's] nostalgia, like his set design, is so contrived that I don't believe he really believes in it as anything other than a visual style. The Grand Budapest Hotel is a perfect miniature world, but it left me cold.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
80% Muppets Most Wanted (2014) Kermit [the Frog] embodies the strange magic of puppetry. He's human and animal; real and make-believe; an avatar for the joyous, unfettered imagination that [Jim] Henson brought into the world.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
95% Sing Street (2016) Scenes transparently designed to sweep an audience away with the power of music falter, because the songs are weak. But the young cast do look the part.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
96% The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years (2016) The achievement of [Ron] Howard's documentary is to make the familiar feel new again, placing the viewer inside that moment - even if you never lived it - when to witness The Beatles was to watch the horizon of your world brighten before you like the dawn‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
93% I, Daniel Blake (2017) Newcastle-born stand-up comedian Dave Johns plays this largely non-comedic part with understated warmth.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
98% Moonlight (2016) It is tempting to call it a universal story, a timeless story, but this is too comforting, too glib.It is a specific story, of being queer, black and poor in America - still a story that is little told onscreen.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
100% O.J.: Made in America (2016) It will stand alongside the similarly epic Hoop Dreams as a documentary that, with sport as its ostensible subject, also serves as an examination of race in America, and of fame's perverse and distorting effects.‐ The Monthly (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017