Armond White Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Armond White

Armond White
Armond White's reviews (from any publication) always count toward the Tomatometer because this critic is a Tomatometer-approved critic.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
97% Kubo and the Two Strings (2016) Kubo is a delicate tale addressing today's sense of moral bereavement. This is conveyed through the boy's search for the father he never knew. Little Kubo's gallantry parallels the desperation of youth from broken families.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Aug 19, 2016
95% Tickled (2016) [Farrier] leaves what's most interesting about the underground fetish in Tickled untouched.‐ Out Magazine
Read More | Posted Aug 18, 2016
56% Jason Bourne (2016) Each new Bourne sells a new variation on skepticism, nihilism, and gloom, supposedly enlivened by director Paul Greengrass's hyperactive, overly edited, always indecipherable chases, explosions, and fight scenes.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2016
91% Women He's Undressed (2016) Gossipy, trivial and unrevealing, Women He's Undressed is the wrong kind of trifecta.‐ Out Magazine
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2016
97% Little Men (2016) Sachs expands his social consciousness beyond the gay ghetto ...a sign of social progress and the ultimate class assimilation. In Little Men this diversion takes the sting out of the first friendships that many gay men experience as first love.‐ Out Magazine
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2016
26% Suicide Squad (2016) Think metaphorically again, and see that Suicide Squad entangles post-Vietnam and post-9/11 notions about heroism and citizenship...Suicide Squad is The Dirty Dozen for millennial viewers (and voters), who think their patriotic moral conflict is new.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2016
89% The Childhood of a Leader (2016) [Brady Corbet] avoids real intellectualizing and, despite his ambitious technique, sticks to the superficial political innuendo of pseudo-political art movies.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2016
84% Star Trek Beyond (2016) Star Trek Beyond trivializes social issues like militarism and race by downplaying moral seriousness, and replacing it with "action" and genre familiarity. It's cinema as comfort food.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2016
70% Café Society (2016) Woody Allen celebrates the vaunted era of New York's segregated 1930s nightlife - and its West Coast counterpart in Hollywood...Allen uses comedy to avoid serious contemplation of the social inequities that accompany class advancement.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jul 21, 2016
73% Ghostbusters (2016) A feminist Gunga Din, Jones's Patty makes it possible for the SNL white pukka sahibs to feel good about repeating Ghostbusters' Eighties line-up...It disguises Hollywood's entrenched biased hegemony as happily inclusive fun for all.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jul 21, 2016
93% The Mermaid (Mei ren yu) (2016) Chow cares mostly about Liu and Shan's love story - how their spiritual lives transcend their class differences. Yet, Chow balances romantic concerns with the sociological message. Most American films today...work backwards.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jul 21, 2016
96% Nuts! (2016) Caught up in the fun of telling this tall tale, Lane never matches the fine, humbling truth of Our Nixon...Lane's wild narrative flirts with Michael Moore-style deceit and contempt. Yet Lane's essential humanity comes through. ‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jul 21, 2016
77% Wiener-Dog (2016) On its non-Disney-family-movie level, Wiener-Dog is the most unsentimental pet film since Godard's Farewell to Language...But it's the American Eccentric level of self-conscious filmmaking and social commentary that makes Wiener-Dog, frankly, amazing. ‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jul 21, 2016
75% The BFG (2016) The BFG isn't a remake of E.T. or A.I. but its own peculiar epic. It's an involuted fairy tale, leaning both Left and Right, expressing the quiddities of utopian imagination. Spielberg's childlike optimism brings quixotic ideas to life.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jul 1, 2016
32% Chappie (2015) Chappie makes no more sense than the ludicrous alien takeover of District 9 and is just as visually ugly, but, without a Roger Ebert to shill for it, the formula now seems especially out of date and particularly depressing.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2016
88% Buzzard (2015) Marty seems intended to exemplify modern American discontent, but a slacker hero is false to this political moment of digital entrepreneurs. His immature "rebellion" patronizes the very audience...that the young adult Marty resembles.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2016
10% Dirty Grandpa (2016) A burlesque like Dirty Grandpa means to "liberate the oppressed" and does so in a low-comedy way. Ignore the bluenose critics who sharpened their dentures on this movie; ironically, they're the same fools who swallow drivel like The Hunger Games. ‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jun 27, 2016
98% Aferim! (2016) Aferim! is the opposite of a cultural celebration. It uses startling, hilarious misanthropy to portray Eastern Europe's immoral legacy - a hapless, dissolute, pusillanimous culture that has bequeathed the region a cynical present.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jun 27, 2016
63% The Finest Hours (2016) The Finest Hours feels great because it is modest...This makes the film a study in humanism as well as citizenship...It is a nostalgic cultural memoir as much as an action film.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jun 27, 2016
94% Finding Dory (2016) For anyone who is not a legally bound babysitter, Finding Dory offers nothing that will please a taste for finer humor, freer fun, or genuinely expressive filmmaking.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jun 21, 2016
96% De Palma (2016) De Palma is not a shallow artist, but this documentary offers a shallow retrospective on his art, his celebrity, and his "controversy."‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2016
87% The President (2016) Its story of a despot (Mikheil Gomiashvili)...who escapes his country's...capital city...with his cosseted grandson (Dachi Orvelashvili) in tow...looks at brotherhood by satirizing the highhanded excesses of nationhood.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2016
80% Jia Zhangke, a Guy from Fenyang (2016) As Jia guides Salles through Fenyang, formerly a prison, and his past shooting locations, and as he introduces old friends and neighbors, the documentary gives evidence of how a director translates personal experience and political perspective into film.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2016
48% X-Men: Apocalypse (2016) There's little distance between X-Men: Apocalypse and the films of Chinese director Jia Zhangke. Although their audiences are different (juvenile thrill-seekers and art-movie devotees), the films appeal to the same grim taste for catastrophe. ‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2016
98% Love & Friendship (2016) Beneath the impertinent, literary banter is a sedate - almost cold - vision of cruelty, greed, and selfishness. It recalls Stillman's The Last Days of Disco (1998), but without the soulful warmth of disco music to buoy the characters' urbane desperation.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2016
62% Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising (2016) ​Neighbors 2 is designed, rather cleverly, to tickle indulgent parents as well as self-indulgent kids (picking off two target audiences at once). Rogen and director Nicholas Stoller satirize outdated morality and pitiable decorum.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2016
81% Sunset Song (2016) Terence Davies' Sunset Song, a personalized tale about young Christine Guthrie (Agyness Deyn) growing up in rural Scotland just before World War One, is also a national epic about one's connection to a culture through language and the land. ‐ National Review
Read More | Posted May 16, 2016
57% Money Monster (2016) Money Monster (also the name of Gates's program) pretends to expose Wall Street chicanery at the same time as critiquing opportunistic television. Who do Clooney, director Jodie Foster, and lead screenwriter Jamie Linden think they are?‐ National Review
Read More | Posted May 16, 2016
90% Captain America: Civil War (2016) Captain America and Iron Man almost represent the schism that now divides American voters, politicians, and pundits. I say "almost," because the film...doesn't inspire reflection upon the dire seriousness of our current ideological civil war.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted May 12, 2016
91% The Measure of a Man (La loi du marché) (2016) The Measure of a Man...charts a global unease in the case of a working-class white male trying to stay afloat in Europe's unsteady economy...Brizé's unplotted, naturalistic style highlights a common man's series of on-going indignities. ‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Apr 26, 2016
70% A Hologram for the King (2016) Hanks has moved forward - as an artist must, and as American foreign policy should have - toward reconciliation. A Hologram for the King lets modern technological commitment...lead toward Clay's rediscovery of his humanity.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Apr 26, 2016
80% Confirmation (2016) Grant and Famuyiwa, with their dependence on famous names and talking heads, prove incapable of achieving character depth, atmosphere, or intellectual nuance. Instead, this turning-point cultural event falls into the maw of TV sensationalism.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Apr 15, 2016
82% Standing Tall (La Tête Haute) (2016) Bercot's best irony is the film's fleet, incisive style - not docudrama but emotional precision in the composition, editing, and perfectly pitched humane performances (including Catherine Deneuve and Benoit Magimel at their compassionate best).‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Apr 11, 2016
73% Louder Than Bombs (2016) Norwegian director Joachim Trier makes his first American film with Louder than Bombs, but shows off the same morose affectations as in his previous work, Reprise and Oslo, August 31st (a not bad but still lesser update of Louis Malle's The Fire Within). ‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Apr 11, 2016
52% Demolition (2016) In Demolition, director Jean-Marc Vallée goes for the same slick, scattershot existentialism as in his previous films, The Dallas Buyers Club and Wild. ‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Apr 11, 2016
20% I Saw the Light (2016) Abraham ignores cultural specifics that could illuminate the society that produced a figure like Hiram King Williams, who enjoyed his cultural heritage and took his masculine freedom as brazenly as Miles Davis did.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2016
73% Miles Ahead (2016) Miles Ahead is held together by Cheadle's regard for its subject, which clearly emboldened him, as a first-time director, to attempt filmmaking as complex and original as Davis's musical compositions and improvisation.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2016
27% Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016) In this age of petty Marvels, most comic-book movies merely perpetrate fantasies of power, but Snyder, enacting his personal aesthetic, braves a film that examines those fantasies. He boldly challenges popular culture's current decay.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2016
43% Tricked (Steekspel) (2016) In Tricked (Verhoeven calls it "My 14 1/2, like Fellini's 8 1/2"), the character-driven story still relies on a visual effect - the exposed behind-the-scenes process of filmmaking. ‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2016
80% Eddie The Eagle (2016) The clichés in Eddie the Eagle are upfront, but these are also verities; they are organic to the story and essential to the example that Eddie represents.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2016
46% Knight of Cups (2016) We desperately need a reminder that the film industry still comprises human beings with recognizable histories - and souls. ‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2016
83% Midnight Special (2016) Yes, it's claptrap, but not entirely dismissable, because of Nichols's compelling grasp of two authentic aspects of American experience: the parochial white South and our continued indulgence of the youth cult.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2016
40% Me Him Her (2016) Me Him Her (the title eschews any punctuation that would separate people) expands the rom-com into social compassion.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2016
37% The Brothers Grimsby (2016) Cohen's burlesque (raunchy sex gags so blatant they're surreal) is his most hilarious and effective mode, but half-jokes about government surveillance expose a double standard; he's either politically ignorant or dishonest.‐ National Review
Read More | Posted Mar 16, 2016
92% Frost/Nixon (2008) It takes a nincompoop like Howard to imagine depth in this silliness.‐ New York Press
Read More | Posted Oct 28, 2014
91% Tales from the Golden Age (2011) Puiu's a skillful widescreen filmmaker, but he's also an urban snob who finds farm animals backward and funny.‐ New York Press
Read More | Posted Aug 24, 2011
73% Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life (2011) Sfar rescues Gainsbourg from hipsters' self-satisfied claims.‐ New York Press
Read More | Posted Aug 24, 2011
68% Our Idiot Brother (2011) Usually movies this slick and contrived have a shiny, Hollywood look, but Our Idiot Brother's unslick look is dreadful. It lacks the professionalism of mumblecore.‐ New York Press
Read More | Posted Aug 24, 2011
36% One Day (2011) One Day is neither comedy nor satire; it uses numerous narrative gimmicks to avoid the fact of its humdrum banality.‐ New York Press
Read More | Posted Aug 18, 2011
44% 30 Minutes or Less (2011) Sexism may be inseparable from the imperatives of male aggression. 30 Minutes or Less ridicules this...‐ New York Press
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2011