A.S. Hamrah

A.S. Hamrah
Tomatometer-approved critic
Biography:
A.S. Hamrah is the film critic for n+1. He also currently writes for Harper's Magazine, the Baffler, Bookforum, and Cineaste. He previously wrote for The Boston Phoenix, Suck.com, In These Times, and Reason.
Publications: Harper's Magazine, n+1, 4Columns

movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year Review
83% The Other Side of the Wind (2018) Where Hannaford crashes and burns, Welles succeeds with brilliance, adding to the sense of tragedy surrounding the film. It should have come out in its time. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 17, 2018
No Score Yet The Queen of Sheba Meets the Atom Man (1963) The Queen of Sheba Meets the Atom Man should be projected twenty-four hours a day somewhere in Manhattan, so that before we're all pushed into the sea off Rockaway Beach people can be reminded of the strange form of life that once lived here. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 17, 2018
93% Support the Girls (2018) Like the manager she plays, Hall is a team player to the end. I'm not sure the ensemble cast doesn't overshadow her. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 17, 2018
88% Wobble Palace (2018) Nekrasova's voice is the voice of a generation - in tone at least. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 17, 2018
94% Burning (Beoning) (2018) Burning raises actual questions about money and its effects on people's lives. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 17, 2018
91% Mandy (2018) Mandy achieves its goals with blunter and larger instruments, which is all the better... - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 17, 2018
76% Let the Corpses Tan (Laissez bronzer les cadavres!) (2018) As a feature film, it's pointless and repetitive, especially the squeaking-leather-pants sound effect that recurs over and over again. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 17, 2018
92% Gavagai (2018) Tregenza is not sketching the wistful unhappiness of the moneyed creative class so much as staring into the divide between souls. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 17, 2018
100% Leave No Trace (2018) Like Captain Fantastic from a couple of years ago, but with much more art, grace, and a sense of actual danger, Leave No Trace restates the male Gen-X narrative of protecting children from the outside world and their eventual reintegration into it. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 17, 2018
51% Equalizer 2 (2018) The Equalizer 2 begins with a lot of momentum. It dissipates as attention shifts to Washington's former spy colleagues. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 17, 2018
97% Mission: Impossible - Fallout (2018) Cruise is a live-action testament to his own ability to take punishment, a kind of human sacrifice. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 17, 2018
96% BlacKkKlansman (2018) The film works well when Washington puts on his white voice to prank call Klansmen. He aspirates the word white with the precision Diane Keaton brought to the word wheat in Love and Death... - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 17, 2018
91% Crazy Rich Asians (2018) Crazy Rich Asians looks more like a glossy tourist magazine produced for an international economics summit than a movie. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 17, 2018
49% Femme Fatale (2002) De Palma brings a lifetime's contemplation of cinematic trickery to this, his most abstract and satisfying thriller. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
41% Vanilla Sky (2001) Crowe's baby-boomer fantasy tinkles with notions like a jostled perfume counter. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
74% Eyes Wide Shut (1999) It was a knockout in the first round. Kubrick's fluid camerawork lulled them. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
67% The Last Big Thing (1996) The two of them are strangely resilient, and so is the film, a gem from an era of manufactured cult items. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
84% Taste of Cherry (Ta'm e Guilass) (1998) [An] unexpected break in the narrative deepens the film's ambiguous ending and makes it more powerful. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
78% I Shot Andy Warhol (1996) [A] compelling portrait of Warhol's would-be assassin. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
93% La Cérémonie (A Judgement in Stone) (1995) Chabrol undermines the concept of "the reveal" by getting it out of the way before he does anything else. It's the first sneaky move in a subtly radical film. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
No Score Yet Anjaam (1994) I don't know if any of Rawail's other movies reach the frenzied pitch of Anjaam. Maybe Dixit's possessed pulchritude sent him to a frightening, dizzying height he's never known before and hasn't since. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
85% They Live (1988) They Live addresses what another character in it calls "the annihilation of consciousness." Carpenter means class consciousness, too. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
96% Stranger Than Paradise (1984) Stranger Than Paradise captures what in retrospect turned out to be a last moment of unbranded American reality. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
91% The King of Comedy (1983) There's something epic in the confrontation between Robert De Niro and Jerry Lewis. The modern sculptures it takes place around lend it a Greek quality. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
No Score Yet On Top of the Whale (1982) [A] moody, hilarious movie. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
79% The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976) In Mr. Sophistication, Meade Roberts, a screenwriter Cassavetes tapped to act, created an unforgettable figure. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
88% F for Fake (1974) Did Welles write those marvelous lines about reality himself? He must have. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
98% The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie (Le Charme Discret de la Bourgeoisie) (1972) Triggered by minor annoyances, the dreams and memories of civil servants invade the lives of Buñuel's upper-class characters whenever they sit down to eat. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
92% The Heartbreak Kid (1972) Neil Simon's screenplay, from a Bruce Jay Friedman story, must be given credit along with May's direction and the film's priceless performances. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
93% Wanda (1971) The film hurts. Its plodding grimness reduces life to getting money and eating. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
82% Reazione a catena (A Bay of Blood) (Twitch of the Death Nerve) (1972) Radical and surprising. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
91% L'Amour Fou (1969) ...the film in which Rivette's previously murky aspirations as a filmmaker coalesced, revealing his true direction. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
89% Les Biches (Bad Girls) (Girlfriends) (The Does) (1968) Les Biches, a clearing of the decks for Chabrol, ushered in six years of great filmmaking. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
No Score Yet Just for the Hell of It (1968) Just for the Hell of It is cheap and ugly, but if it isn't art, nothing is. Which is exactly Lewis's point. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
86% Kill, Baby, Kill (Operazione paura) (Curse of the Living Dead) (Don't Walk in the Park) (1966) It's utterly convincing, a reminder that cinema had all the tools it needed before computers. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
100% La prise de pouvoir par Louis XIV (The Taking of Power by Louis XIV)(The Rise of Louis XIV) (1970) Rossellini's moving camera keeps it lively even as he criticizes the kind of spectacle Louis uses to rule, the kind movies make of history. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
No Score Yet Zontar: Thing from Venus (1966) In the end it's a valid document of a place that did survive some kind of attack, but kept on going the same dull way, learning nothing. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
80% Fahrenheit 451 (1966) Truffaut brought more cinematic acumen to this minute-long sequence than many filmmakers deploy in an entire feature. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
92% Masculin Feminin (1966) Often regarded as an indictment of plasticity or misogynist cruelty, Godard's "interview with a Consumer Product" is one of the things that stops Masculine-Feminine from being the yé-yé movie some buffs would prefer. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
73% The Patsy (1964) ...Lewis' comedy is so exasperating it makes people watching it break things, the way his handlers drop cups and overturn bottles watching him in disbelief at his one-of-a-kind incompetence... - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
79% The Killers (1964) Marvin is the un-McQueen. Not handsome, unconcerned with the audience and therefore compelling, he is distant and takes things personally. He's too smart to be monumental like other movie stars, but when he falls it's like a world got killed. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
98% Eyes Without a Face (1962) Franju and Shüfftan denature these trees. Without leaves they are skeletal, bodies without flesh. The sounds of nonmigratory birds and chained dogs barking dot the soundtrack like the trees line the picture... - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
86% Ride Lonesome (1959) Nothing is wasted in the stripped-down clarity of Ride Lonesome's eighty minutes. This is the apotheosis of the classical western. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
86% The Big Knife (1955) [Steiger] explodes like a neutron bomb, leaving the set standing but obliterating the people. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
97% In a Lonely Place (1950) It's not just the end, but the film's whole last half hour that wrecks you. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
94% Los Olvidados (1952) It put the realism back in surrealism, mixing poverty and nightmares. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
100% White Heat (1949) Before White Heat, no gangster film had featured anybody like Cody Jarrett. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
89% The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) The butchering of The Magnificent Ambersons is indefensible, yet Welles critics have been making excuses for it for years. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 26, 2018
97% Ninotchka (1939) This is the cinema's lightest and sharpest appraisal of communism. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 26, 2018
97% La Grande illusion (Grand Illusion) (1938) Unstructured, amateurish nonsense coalesces into meaning and beauty. The variety show's foolishness doesn't just stand in for the civilization the war leaves behind-it becomes its living proof. - n+1 EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 26, 2018