Basil Wright

Basil Wright
Basil Wright's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer® when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Sight and Sound The Spectator

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
95% Son of Frankenstein (1939) The Son of Frankenstein is, in short, a missed opportunity for all save the most unsophisticated. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2020
No Score Yet Amphitryon (1935) When Marguerite Moreno, as the outraged spouse of Zeus, is on the screen, all else is forgiven and forgotten. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2020
100% True Confession (1937) [True Confession] is a carefully calculated essay in controlled lunacy -- controlled, because it is nearly always true enough to the humanities to remain curiously convincing, lunatic chiefly because of John Barrymore's macabre performance. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
No Score Yet Men of Two Worlds (1952) With all its faults the film has the great quality of sincerity ; and in many respects it has naiveté which is comparable to that of some of the Soviet films, and which in films of any origin whatever is not to be despised. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 29, 2020
81% To Each His Own (1946) This one is set in war-time England (a very curious country) and involves that clever, but in this case stultified actress, Olivia de Havilland. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 21, 2020
No Score Yet Let George Do It! (To Hell with Hitler) (1940) Never mind the plot, but don your lowest and most receptive brow, cast social inhibitions to the wind, and enjoy fully a manifestation of that special quality which in no small measure represents what we are fighting to defend. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2020
98% His Girl Friday (1940) His Girl Friday is certainly very funny it is also slickly directed, and the chief parts are acted with diamond-cut-diamond precision by Rosalind Russell and Cary Grant. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2020
No Score Yet The Key (1958) Carol Reed is right back on form. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 30, 2020
91% The Criminal Life of Archibaldo de la Cruz (Ensayo de un crimen)(Rehearsal for a Crime) (1955) This is what makes Archibaldo so fascinating. It expresses one simple story idea. It goes straight ahead, sequence by sequence, and it never loiters or takes a wrong turning. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 18, 2020
97% The Big Sleep (1946) It is brilliantly directed and photographed. It moves with breathless speed. The acting is admirable. The dialogue (Raymond Chandler and William Faulkner are among those credited) is of an unusually high level of humour and crispness. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 22, 2019
100% L'Atalante (1934) Again, and unrepentantly, I call attention to the purity of Vigo's filmic conception, to his genius for presenting the world to us in subjective terms, in terms of the secret and not the public life of the human being. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 22, 2019
100% Rebecca (1940) It may be conceded that Rebecca is a film well worth careful study by students of the cinema. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2019
82% The Life of Emile Zola (1937) The film has all the elements of greatness. It is also remarkably accurate. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 14, 2019
71% A Damsel in Distress (1937) The inspired lunacy of the Wodehouse prose style cannot, however, survive the change of medium, and the director has failed to capture the typical Blandings atmosphere. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2018
83% The Drum (Drums) (1938) The appeal is to the shallower herd instinct, the instinct which prefers, with double instinctiveness, to mistake melodrama for tragedy, and is too willingly moved to tears by a regiment marching-though it knows not whither or why. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2018
100% Angels with Dirty Faces (1938) Angels With Dirty Faces is a very exciting gangster film. The scenario is by Rowland Brown and the direction is by Michael Curtiz, who has a fine sense of visual rhythm. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2018
100% Black Narcissus (1947) Designed and photographed with an almost breathtaking sense of beauty. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
100% The Grapes of Wrath (1940) The Grapes of Wrath is, in fact, the greatest master- piece the screen has ever produced; in it John Ford has established in vivid and inescapable terms the knowledge of good and evil. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 3, 2015