Basil Wright

Basil Wright
Basil Wright's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Spectator
Publications: The Spectator

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
97% The Big Sleep (1946) It is brilliantly directed and photographed. It moves with breathless speed. The acting is admirable. The dialogue (Raymond Chandler and William Faulkner are among those credited) is of an unusually high level of humour and crispness. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 22, 2019
100% L'Atalante (1934) Again, and unrepentantly, I call attention to the purity of Vigo's filmic conception, to his genius for presenting the world to us in subjective terms, in terms of the secret and not the public life of the human being. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 22, 2019
100% Rebecca (1940) It may be conceded that Rebecca is a film well worth careful study by students of the cinema. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2019
78% The Life of Emile Zola (1937) The film has all the elements of greatness. It is also remarkably accurate. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 14, 2019
71% A Damsel in Distress (1937) The inspired lunacy of the Wodehouse prose style cannot, however, survive the change of medium, and the director has failed to capture the typical Blandings atmosphere. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2018
83% The Drum (Drums) (1938) The appeal is to the shallower herd instinct, the instinct which prefers, with double instinctiveness, to mistake melodrama for tragedy, and is too willingly moved to tears by a regiment marching-though it knows not whither or why. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2018
100% Angels with Dirty Faces (1938) Angels With Dirty Faces is a very exciting gangster film. The scenario is by Rowland Brown and the direction is by Michael Curtiz, who has a fine sense of visual rhythm. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2018
100% Black Narcissus (1947) Designed and photographed with an almost breathtaking sense of beauty. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
100% The Grapes of Wrath (1940) The Grapes of Wrath is, in fact, the greatest master- piece the screen has ever produced; in it John Ford has established in vivid and inescapable terms the knowledge of good and evil. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 3, 2015