Bedatri D. Choudhury

Bedatri D. Choudhury
Tomatometer-approved critic

movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet Spell Reel (2017) Spell Reel is a diligent and painstaking recording of the processes of excavating, restoring and exploring the after-lives of the films of Guinea-Bissau. - MUBI EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 17, 2019
91% Dazed and Confused (1993) It is a nostalgia film and a coming-of-age film. In some ways, it is every Bildungsroman and in some ways, it is like no other. - MUBI EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 17, 2019
100% Personal Problems (2018) One doesn't quite watch Personal Problems for its technical superiority, one watches it for the problems that still persist, to draw a line of legacy for A Wrinkle in Time, Black Panther and Mudbound that have been made - MUBI EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 17, 2019
No Score Yet Unishe April (19th April) (1994) The story of a regular daughter and her successful mother that is told compellingly and immersively, and without a hint of mansplaining. - Vague Visages EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 16, 2019
No Score Yet Pahuna: The Little Visitors (2017) At a deeper level, for us adults, Pahuna is a reality check, a question we are uncomfortable answering. It asks us and our governments about the world we are leaving behind for the future generations. - Vague Visages EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 10, 2019
No Score Yet Half Widow (2017) This is the story of a woman who takes small steps into becoming as limitless and boundless as her name and favourite color. Blue. Neela. - Vague Visages EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 10, 2019
No Score Yet Long Live Brij Mohan (2018) Long Live Brij Mohan! is a film that doesn't allow the viewer to take sides - it doesn't have an easy plot that makes it clear who is a good guy and who is a bad guy. - Vague Visages EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2019
57% Ribbon (2016) Ribbon and its smallness (and everydayness) is not just a refreshing break but an extremely well-timed breaking of the mold. - Vague Visages EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2019
67% The Hungry (2017) Though the screenplay loses its tautness from time to time, The Hungry still makes for an engrossing watch and serves as an extremely promising feature debut from Chatterjee. - Vague Visages EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2019
No Score Yet Juze (JuJe) (2017) Juze tells the story of an India we don't often see in films, but an India that hurts, suffers and yet revolts and thrives. - Vague Visages EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2019
67% Omertà (2018) Sadly, Omerta ends up being a rather flat narrative, clinical in its depiction of events most people are aware of through news reports. - Vague Visages EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2019
93% Hidden Figures (2017) Hidden Figures inspires hope; not only because the scenes that show the lone woman in heels standing amidst a sea of black ties, not just because the women running their chalks over blackboards to solve equation after equation... - Huffington Post EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2019
98% Moonlight (2016) In times of Ferguson, in the times that Eric Garner lived, it is radical to see Moonlight's Chiron still have enough love to give to Kevin. - Huffington Post EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2019
88% Badhaai Ho (2018) It brings with itself an assurance that a good film with a good story told convincingly will always find its takers. - Forbes EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2019
87% Non-Fiction (2019) Non-Fiction is definitely one of the more chattier Assayas films, and it is dotted with his amazing sense of humour. - Vague Visages EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2019
No Score Yet Nude (2017) Nude, emerging from western-Indian regional Maharashtrian cinema, is a beacon of radical hope. - Vague Visages EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2019
60% A Faithful Man (L'homme fidèle) (2018) Garrel's second feature film as a director is as delicate and delightful as a well-whipped meringue: light, fluffy, sweet and delectable. - Vague Visages EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2019
73% Papi Chulo (2018) Apart from fantastic performances from its cast, especially Bomer and Patiño, Papi Chulo's biggest strength is the subtlety and grace with which it deals with the wide cross-section of issues it touches upon. - Vague Visages EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2019
94% Chavela (2017) Watching Chavela Vargas sing is like watching rain clouds gather against a hill; she appears onstage, takes to the mic, and sings in her husky tenor. The pain in her songs plays out through the twitch of an eyebrow... - Bitch Media EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2019
94% RBG (2018) Feminism is not a fad, and the Notorious RBG continues to be in the fight for the long haul. - Bitch Media EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2019
98% Leaning Into the Wind (2018) Goldsworthy's art is driven by an awareness of instability and mortality, which makes it a profound celebration of the present, of life. - Hyperallergic EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2019
80% Love, Cecil (2018) Vreeland makes a concerted effort to probe beyond the Cecil Beaton the world knows. - Hyperallergic EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2019
91% Nico, 1988 (2018) Over and over again, Nicchiarelli's film advocates for a recognition of Nico that goes beyond her stint as a singer for The Velvet Underground. - Hyperallergic EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2019
100% Walking on Water (2018) Watching the eccentric luddite Christo bringing the installation to life is like watching a magician perform a drawn-out magic trick. - Hyperallergic EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2019
No Score Yet Jay Myself (2018) We witness not just an artist anxious about his uprooting, but also the anxiety of a city as it changes beyond recognition. - Hyperallergic EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2019
B 93% Newton (2017) Newton is a political film, but it is also a very witty. So there is no lecturing, no overt sloganeering, but only a very wry, ironical take on the way things function in India. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2019
C 60% The Hummingbird Project (2019) When the project finally manages to achieve the numbers it had set out to achieve, it is obsolete and one is left wondering at the massive waste of time, energy, and money the film centers itself around. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2019
C+ 80% Hotel Mumbai (2019) Hotel Mumbai is a great crowd pleaser but with a dangerously myopic narrative that, even with its flaws, serves a fitting tribute to the resilience of the people who lived and died through the terror attacks of 2008... - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2019
C 71% Greta (2019) It was, in fact, barely a thriller and while I did rattle my brain trying to make sense of what I was seeing, my nerves were fully intact at the end of the viewing. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2019
100% Alanis (2017) Alanis is not a film about conscience or morality but about the insistence of a woman's autonomy over her body. - Another Gaze EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 5, 2018
5/5 76% The Day After (Geu-hu) (2018) While dealing with the trope of the "other woman" Hong Sang-soo's films have always been very philosophical without being moralistic. - MUBI EDIT
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
100% L'eau froide (Cold Water) (1994) Nostalgia seekers talk about the exuberance, the exhilaration, and the excitement of it all. Olivier Assayas, who grew up in the 70s, living through the aftermath of May '68, is not one of them. - MUBI EDIT
Read More | Posted May 7, 2018
94% Loveless (Nelyubov) (2018) [Andrey] Zvyagintsev overturns the idea of romantic redemption; not only is there lovelessness, there is also a frustrating inability to care for another grieving human. - Reverse Shot EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2018