Brian GibsonMovie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Brian Gibson

Brian Gibson
Brian Gibson's reviews (from any publication) always count toward the Tomatometer because this critic is a Tomatometer-approved critic.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
76% Lights Out (2016) At about 75 minutes of run-run-running time, this often claustrophobic chamber piece never drags. The plot is, beyond its occult conceit, perfectly plausible. And the family's mired in a cycle of trauma and loss. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Sep 30, 2016
94% Photographic Memory (2012) In the end, the camera in Photographic Memory is not so much roving as at ease with itself, moving at its own pace, not shambling but ambling along, content in its own small, personal, unassuming search for meaning. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Sep 30, 2016
35% Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates (2016) Never wacky, weird, or wise-ass enough, Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates rings hollow in its daring and just hits too many false comic notes. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Sep 30, 2016
74% The Secret Life of Pets (2016) It's the little touches and elastic comic tension between tame and wild which really snap and zing. Because, after all, this film suggests, beyond all the creature comforts, NYC's just a bunch of animals, every one with its own wild, woolly tale. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Sep 30, 2016
75% The BFG (2016) I enjoyed the dreamcatching and skiddling-along and bogthumping, but the movie was not quite so scrumdiddlyumptious as I was hoping. Mr Spielberg often puts a few too many drops of cozy and lovey into his dream-works. I give the movie three snozzcumbers. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Sep 30, 2016
36% The Legend of Tarzan (2016) The Ape Lord's laconic to the point of catatonic. The real-life Williams is reduced to a comic-book sidekick. There's an over-reliance on a blue-grey palette, extreme close-ups, and aerial shots. Africa's either ravishing wilderness or ravaged wilderness. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Sep 30, 2016
31% Independence Day: Resurgence (2016) Breathlessly, senselessly, on and on this movie skitters and jitters, offering no build-ups, no high-points, even scene-switching perfunctorily just to connect plot-dots. There's not a single moment of original, dramatic sci-fi action for us to enjoy. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Sep 30, 2016
94% Finding Dory (2016) Two raffish sea lions, a loony bird, and camouflaging, ink-blurting Gary are welcome new additions. But there's no thematic reason to return to Nemo-land-the messages are predictable. Sprightly and amusing but a bit slight and not quite memorable enough. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Sep 30, 2016
34% Now You See Me 2 (2016) The five prestidigitators' political pretense-a show of Snowden-era privacy protection-seems flimsier as the plotting gets more personal. In the end, this is fast and furious franchise-formula. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Sep 30, 2016
85% Francofonia (2016) Unfortunately, as one man's idiosyncratic rumination on not just the Louvre during the Occupation but how the Louvre occupies Europe's imagination, Francofonia's only intermittently interesting. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Sep 30, 2016
61% The Man Who Knew Infinity (2016) As with so much here, the odd couple's increasingly close relationship is overstated, and Hardy's speech to his colleagues about making Ramanujan a Fellow of the Royal Society is as insistent and pleading as the movie, on the whole, seems to be. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Sep 30, 2016
58% Me Before You (2016) Bilious, twee Brit-tedium that tops itself by reducing a disabled man's potential suicide to heartstrings-twanging hokum. What should have died with dignity was this horrid flick, in pre-production. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Sep 30, 2016
98% Love & Friendship (2016) Even as he relishes sinuous-sentence lines, Stillman finds a comic sprightliness in his take on Austen. Crafty and exuberant, this film finely dresses up its radical-rebel of a conniving woman in a polished, poised show of eloquent entertainment. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
30% Alice Through the Looking Glass (2016) Tweedledolt or tweedledumb? It's hard to know what's worst: Alice's preposterous self-actualizing and anachronistic faux-feminism; or how predictable and unnecessary all the timey-wimey stuff, backstory, pop psychologizing, and CGI whiz-whooshery are. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
62% Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising (2016) One scene is brilliant; there are worldly wisecracks; and, rarest of all, a funny Holocaust joke. But many moments drag and jag. Jokes fall flatter until it feels as if Neighbors 2 has number-crunched comedy down to a hit-miss ratio. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
90% The Boy And The Beast (Bakemono No Ko) (2016) The scenes of luminance, slow pans, flashbacks, and action sequences here are masterly. Yet it's that deep, rancorous affection between adoptive father and surrogate son spurring, charging, stampeding The Boy and the Beast along. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
57% Money Monster (2016) And on this potted, ploddingly plotted pretense at socio-economic drama goes, until you realize what matters here is only the show itself--the self-sustaining, sensational spectacle of movie-machinery, gears greasing along in the guise of edu-tainment. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
76% Keanu (2016) Can still feel like sketch-work stretched and splayed too far, though the sheer, dogged commitment of both men to this material (written by Peele and series-writer Alex Rubens) makes for enough laughs. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
17% Ratchet & Clank (2016) Not wretched and clunky, at least, Ratchet & Clank adapts the Playstation game but feels more like a candy-coloured circus act, full of clowning-around and furry things but signifying, well, not much. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
70% A Hologram for the King (2016) It's best when addling us with that jet-lagged strangeness of the first few days in a baffling new land. Its shimmering-mirages of strangeness and even its mature, second-chances romance are enough to make this hologram flicker to life. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
17% The Huntsman: Winter's War (2016) What happens when an unnecessary sequel, CGI aplenty, and usually good actors get snow-plowed into each other at hyper-Zamboni speed-none will survive. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
92% Requiem For The American Dream (2016) The directors bring to filmic life Chomsky's calm, composed talking-points--his measured, reasonable long-view of history and polic--with inventive framing of archival footage and coolly sharp images. A potent Panama Papers-era dissection of power. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
95% The Jungle Book (2016) Kipling's tales get the full action-adventure treatment here, providing some thrills, though the cute-animal factor and tame storyline make it more furry family fun than a beastly tale that digs its claws right into you. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
95% Eye In The Sky (2016) Eye in the Sky, air plotting, street sweeping, and home invading, chillingly and intricately maps the murky terrain of today's remote-warfare, where lives become data points and video images, edited out of existence on-screen. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
22% The Boss (2016) Swaggers and bulls through a few pratfalls and chuckles, slips in its childish efforts at crass comedy, slumps in its let's-be-a-family sentiment, and market-crashes with its moronic capitalist message for grrrl$. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
98% Finders Keepers (2015) Bryan Carberry and Clay Tweel's documentary, opening the lid on the lives of the two men at odds over this oddity, discovers a lump-in-the-throat poignancy as it re-appraises just how hard it can be to pick up the pieces of a life. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
80% Chi-Raq (2015) This overlong concept-film/disquisition mostly misfires. Its heart-on-sleeve power gets muddled by its confusion of brash with blatant and politics with polemics. There's much pronouncement and protestation; docu-realism's mixed up with too-broad farce. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
30% My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (2016) Flames out with moments cheesier than saganaki and more honeyed than the sickly sweetest baklava. The empty-nest nonsense is cringingly overwrought, with moments to curdle your blood into month-old tzatziki. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
27% Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016) Snyder's gone all drab and dire, determined to lay siege to our senses (and plot). There's so much glowering, gloominess and good-ness talk that it's hard to imagine the sun, or justice, ever dawning for this disastrous cavalcade of dreary characters. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
99% Starred Up (2014) O'Connell's physicality as an actor--coiled intensity, searing stares, brooding fury, sudden violence--is blazingly showcased here. And it always feels as if we're caught up in among resentments, flare-ups, even long-running relationships of convenience. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
12% The Divergent Series: Allegiant (2016) As for the series maturing, well, Allegiant (a fancy word for 'loyal') is like man's allegiant best friend, stuck at the puppy stage--seeming so cute, but mostly just chasing its own tail, round and round, barking through the same old motions. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
93% The Little Prince (2016) Mark Osborne's feature-length adaptation adds a dominant frame story that, at first, plays off the famous little fable (splendidly animated) within it quite nicely, only to overwhelm the original in its action-adventure third act. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
90% 10 Cloverfield Lane (2016) Its plot is finely calibrated and its atmosphere cannily climate-controlled. A deliciously terrifying treat to swallow down, hard, with a gulp. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
96% Nina Forever (2016) Ghoulishly, perversely putting the ex back in sex, Nina Forever memorably resurrects the love triangle. Although overlong--a bit laborious and lugubrious--this film's basic, bloody conceit sustains it deep into its strange, sexy, macabre night. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jun 2, 2016
51% Risen (2016) The greatest mystery of all remains: why create a plodding-along movie about an investigator trying to reason away the divine and an investigation whose twists and turns we can read all about in the original, a good book? ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Feb 25, 2016
84% Deadpool (2016) The spandex-stretches of irreverence and genre ridicule do enough to dress up what remains a formulaic story. When the scoffs turns smirky, though, Deadpool gets tiresome. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Feb 25, 2016
12% The Choice (2016) The Choice, hooked up to a sap-dripping IV, drifts through The Instant Attraction, eyelid-flutters through The Sudden Misfortune, and flatlines with The Miracle. Sparks-style, sadness is sanctified as the tear-distilled purity-essence of love. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Feb 25, 2016
72% Dreams of a Life (2012) How awfully, strangely death can void a personal identity. The filling-in of the chalk outline remains sketchy, as Morley well knows. This docu-obituary's sharply aware of its own bit-ness, its partial-ness. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Feb 9, 2016
93% The Black Panthers: Vanguard Of The Revolution (2015) Nelson's work, feeling more fragmented than kaleidoscopic, falls short of '60s-activist docs The Weather Underground (2002) or 1971 (2014). But sobering images and snippets of poetic insight linger. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Feb 9, 2016
89% Tokyo Godfathers (2003) Hana tends to swoon into stereotype, her theatricality and campiness infecting the other non-hetero characters here, with so many of them wailing or sobbing. The story's comedy and pathos can be similarly overwrought, too. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Feb 9, 2016
16% The 5th Wave (2016) Mostly, the movie evaporates into misty clichés and sentiment. Military scenes play out like first-person shooter games. Cassie earnestly declaims, 'Hope makes us human,' but it's this movie's obvious hope for a sequel that makes it so Hollywood. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Feb 9, 2016
66% Dark Star: HR Giger's World (2015) Only a few of the personal responses or reminiscences here are truly interesting. But it's Giger's images alone which hold our gaze, confronting and confounding us, intriguing and chilling, snaking and startling. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Feb 9, 2016
9% Norm of the North (2016) As sub-par as the Arctic is sub-zero, Norm of the North is a lumbering snooze. Even some bad puns would have at least made Norm of the North a little more bearable. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Feb 9, 2016
84% Victoria (2015) Beyond the drawn-out patter of predictable story beats, Victoria's basic problem is that its wanton wanna-bes behave 'so stupid,' yet the movie keeps trying to give their sloppiness and its own scruffiness a mytho-poetic arthouse profundity. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Feb 9, 2016
92% Millennium Actress (Sennen joyû) (2001) A chase film that's chasing after films. All the world's a set as cinema and reality thrillingly blur in this second feature from Satoshi Kon. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Feb 9, 2016
80% A Letter to Momo (2014) Here, magic-realism and emotional realism run together. The story can lapse into jokiness or drag its heels a little. But when Momo's anguish bursts, and she soon realizes how sad her mother's truly been, the film bursts to life. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jan 9, 2016
68% Perfect Blue (1999) The mood is spot-on, then deliriously spottier. As Mima's sense of what's real dissolves, the film spins mirror-plates of possible realities, shattering them on the set of Mima's film before a B-movie-ish action-climax and a too-pat whodunit? reveal. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jan 9, 2016
43% In the Heart of the Sea (2015) The images here lash and last; the story creaks and groans. Anthony Dod Mantle's cinematography is brilliant; it's as if we're looking back at this past through a water-sloshed spyglass, darkly. The simpler story's too rote and modern, though. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jan 9, 2016
65% Krampus (2015) If this black-comedy horror had had more deep, dark laughs and less drawn-out, what's-around-the-corner horror, it could have been a helliday cult-classic contender. The movie loses too much of its satirical spirit. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jan 9, 2016
96% Sister (2012) It's a Dardennes-like move that Meier makes here, plunking us down, without judgment, in the middle of a low life. Just 13 here, Klein, who debuted in Meier's Home at 10 as the son Julien (a name he uses here as an alias) is remarkable. ‐ Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
Posted Jan 9, 2016