Budd Wilkins Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Budd Wilkins

Budd Wilkins
Budd Wilkins's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Film Journal International, Slant Magazine

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
47% Godard Mon Amour (Le redoutable) (2018) Godard Mon Amour isn't entertainment for the masses, it's closer to character assassination.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Apr 20, 2018
92% Zama (2018) Zama is a complex and sometimes deliberately disconcerting film.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2018
96% The Endless (2018) An excellent foray into Lovecraftian horror, mixing cosmic dread and some mordant humor in ways that manage to be consistently disorienting. ‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2018
100% Salomé (2013) Al Pacino's film adaptation of Oscar Wilde's Salomé benefits considerably from uniformly strong performances and some consummate technical craftsmanship.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Mar 29, 2018
86% Wilde Salomé (2013) Al Pacino's documentary 'Wilde Salomé' proves to be more satisfying as an examination of Oscar Wilde and his play than as an exploration of Pacino's theatrical methodology.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Mar 29, 2018
87% Hannah (2018) Andrea Pallaoro's second feature is a formally rigorous, minimalistic character study of a woman who's slowly excommunicated from society.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Mar 8, 2018
60% They Remain (2018) Stylish audiovisual feast for adventurous genre enthusiasts, even if the relatively slender storyline has to rank among the least of its inducements.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2018
88% Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun? (2018) Wilkerson's ruminative documentary brings home the filmmaker's preoccupation with the confluence of individual and institutional violence in an exceptionally personal manner.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Mar 1, 2018
89% In the Intense Now (No Intenso Agora) (2018) Examines the cataclysmic potential, as well as the sobering limitations and unintended consequences, exemplified by the revolutionary movements of 1968.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Jan 31, 2018
50% The Misguided (2018) Doesn't entirely live up to (or is that down to...?) its admonitory title.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Jan 25, 2018
No Score Yet Drawing Home (2017) You can tick the boxes of the tired biopic tropes Drawing Home unabashedly indulges.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2017
100% La Belle Noiseuse (1991) Jacques Rivette's magisterial portrait of the creative process lays bare an artist's conflicted responsibilities toward life and art.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
78% Sweet Virginia (2017) Despite the best efforts of a game cast, Jamie M. Dagg's atmospheric neo-noir is hamstrung by dispiritingly predictable storytelling and thinly drawn characterizations.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2017
87% Song of Granite (2017) Pat Collins' film about the life and career of Irish folk singer Joe Heaney is oblique to the point of inscrutability.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Nov 15, 2017
94% Most Beautiful Island (2017) An intense and sometimes claustrophobic allegory about the pitfalls of the immigrant experience under the generic disguise of a psychological thriller.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Nov 1, 2017
88% Flesh and Blood (2017) Gives us the all-too-rare opportunity to hear testimony from the sort of people who are ordinarily held at arm's length by more mainstream American cinema.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Oct 27, 2017
No Score Yet L'enfant secret (1982) Philippe Garrel's brooding 1979 film charts the dissolution of a romance, as well as the birth of a new kind of narrative filmmaking.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2017
No Score Yet Architects Of Denial (2017) David Lee George's documentary offers a stark and compelling, if occasionally muddled, testament to the Armenian genocide and its ongoing geopolitical repercussions.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Oct 5, 2017
20% Alina (2017) Ben Barenholtz's debut as a writer/director is a modest meditation on the perils and pleasures of immigration and assimilation.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
61% 6 Days (2017) This historical hostage docudrama aspires to rigorous objectivity but ultimately tips its hand as an endorsement of hardline conservatism. ‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2017
92% Some Freaks (2017) The psychological acuity with which [director Ian MacAllister-McDonald] delineates his characters more than makes up for [the film's] relatively minor lapses.‐ Film Journal International
Read More | Posted Aug 4, 2017
No Score Yet Erosu Purasu Gyakusatsu (Eros Plus Massacre) (1969) Kiju Yoshida's thought-provoking political trilogy makes its Region A Blu-ray debut with sturdy transfers and some essential contextual bonus materials.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 30, 2017
3/4 75% We Are the Flesh (Tenemos la carne) (2017) The film establishes a hypnotic rhythm through razor-stropped editing and a reverberant sound design that later scenes will disrupt with alarming impunity.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jan 17, 2017
4/4 91% Le Jour se lève (Daybreak) (1939) Like Marcel Carné's earlier Port of Shadows, Daybreak establishes a versatile visual palette that exerted a significant influence over classical noir.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Nov 12, 2014
4/4 100% Hiroshima Mon Amour (1960) The facticity of the film itself is continually called into question by Alain Resnais's decision to blur the boundaries between nonfiction and fiction films.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2014
88% Adieu au langage (Goodbye to Language) (2014) It's a good bit funnier, as well as freer in its rapid-fire associations, than the more strident and structured Film Socialisme. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 24, 2014
97% Two Days, One Night (2014) An old-fashioned social-problem film where the problem magically evaporates.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 21, 2014
89% Amour Fou (2015) An early reference to Kleist's short story The Marquise of O should clue you in on Hausner's stylistic debt to Rohmer's film version, with its static camera setups and gorgeous yet minimalist sets. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 21, 2014
95% Wild Tales (2015) As in the episode with the engineer turned terrorist, where restitution of the family unit supersedes revolutionary politics, it's clear that Szifrón lacks Almodóvar's truly confrontational sensibility.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 21, 2014
87% Winter Sleep (2014) The obvious analogue here would be Bergman's Scenes from a Marriage; the key difference lies in Winter Sleep's absolute refusal to let anything be at emotional stake.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 21, 2014
22% The Search (2015) Michel Hazanavicius's straw man conception of the Russians as brutal homophobes is hammered away at with an emphasis that's questionable at best.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 21, 2014
88% Foxcatcher (2014) As a consequence of Bennett Miller's relentless de-dramatization, Foxcatcher offers us next to nothing of utility or complexity about du Pont's pathology.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 19, 2014
81% The Homesman (2014) If what they have to say on the subject is as remotely superficial as The Homesman, maybe the less said, the better.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 18, 2014
95% National Gallery (2014) Its titular establishment as a springboard for an all-encompassing exploration into the multifarious nature of art as both history and object. This is one of Wiseman's richest and most thought-provoking films, and easily one of his best.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 17, 2014
97% Mr. Turner (2014) Leigh isn't so much interested in artist as martyr as he is in the artist as self-contained multitude, containing all the foibles and paradoxes of his age.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 17, 2014
30% The Captive (2014) For every way that The Sweet Hereafter makes its generic elements seem fresh and even a trifle mysterious, The Captive finds new ways to render them absurd. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 17, 2014
4/4 93% Gojira (1956) Rarely has the open wound of widespread devastation been transposed to celluloid with greater visceral impact.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 13, 2014
3.5/4 100% Shonen (Boy) (1969) Nagisa Oshima and screenwriter Tsutomu Tamura encourage empathy without requiring emotionalism.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jan 15, 2014
94% Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht (Nosferatu the Vampyre) (1979) Nosferatu the Vampyre Playing to the visual and narrative strengths of the original, Werner Herzog still succeeds in imprinting the material with his own unique sensibility.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2013
4/4 82% Scarecrow (1973) Jerry Schatzberg's film embraces sprawl of both the narrative and geographical variety with freewheeling abandon.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 16, 2013
3/4 71% Dead Man's Burden (2013) It's always a pleasure to encounter genre ambition contained in such a sinewy-shot, emotionally resonant, and gorgeously photographed package.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 1, 2013
2/4 59% Eddie The Sleepwalking Cannibal (2013) Because the film clearly aims for satire, Boris Rodriguez isn't entirely guilty of indulging gruesome spectacle for its own sake.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2013
87% The River (1959) Jean Renoir's The River demonstrates with intoxicating lyricism the confluence of apparent contraries: past and present, innocence and experience, permanence and change-even Hinduism and Christianity.‐ House Next Door
Read More | Posted Mar 1, 2013
3.5/4 92% Django (1966) Sergio Corbucci's film is notable not only for the artistry of its construction, but also for the underlying anger that fuels its political agenda.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Dec 20, 2012
4/4 98% The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie (Le Charme Discret de la Bourgeoisie) (1972) Dreams nest within other dreams like so many Chinese puzzle boxes, while no dream belongs exclusively to a single dreamer, as though Buñuel were toying with the Jungian notion of the collective unconscious.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2012
No Score Yet Two Orphan Vampires (1996) The wonderfully ambiguous ending plunges the girls back into the fuggy marshland of the archetypal feminine, two orphan animas in search of their apotheosis.‐ House Next Door
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2012
No Score Yet The Living Dead Girl (La Morte vivante) (1982) The film's blood-spattered descent into positively Jacobean tragedy helps to make it one of Rollin's strongest, most disturbing efforts.‐ House Next Door
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2012
3/4 100% Tristana (1970) Flanked by late-period masterworks that represent the culmination and perfection of Buñuel's long-cherished obsessions, the film is often relegated to the role of overlooked middle child.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Oct 10, 2012
3/4 77% Samsara (2012) Ron Fricke's film is a brightly hued bauble, fit for rapturous contemplation.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2012
3.5/4 65% Cosmopolis (2012) Diamond-hard and dazzlingly brilliant, David Cronenberg's film plays like a deeply perverse, darkly comic successor to Videodrome.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Aug 12, 2012