Celia Simpson Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Celia Simpson

Celia Simpson
Celia Simpson's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Spectator

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
100% The Circus (1928) The Circus is a magnificent film -- a mental tonic and a good hour's physical exercise. No one should miss it.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2018
No Score Yet Rango (1931) Unfortunately, the film has been fitted out with an insipid and superfluous prologue and a spasmodic running commentary.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
100% Chang: A Drama of the Wilderness (1927) The cinema has here brilliantly fulfilled a part for which it is better fitted than any other artistic medium. No book, painting, musical impression or circus could give so adequate and vivid a picture of the jungle.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
92% Blackmail (1929) Blackmail is a better combination of the silent motion picture technique and the talkie technique than any other film we have seen.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
98% Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (1927) There is nothing so very original about this rather sentimental plot, but the manner of its presentation is a welcome innovation.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
No Score Yet Baby ryazanskie (1927) A well- produced non-propaganda film, which might quite well be shown in London.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 15, 2018
No Score Yet Odinnadtsatyy (The Eleventh Year) (1928) I found it difficult to follow as there were no sub-titles for my interpreter to interpret for me, and we seemed to jump from the top of a crane to the pit of a coal mine with no obvious sequence.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2018
No Score Yet The End of St. Petersburg (1927) The Russians have certainly an eye for significant and symbolical detail in their cinema production.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2018
89% October (Ten Days that Shook the World) (1928) No book, picture or play could have given a more realistic impression of those days of bloodshed and horror: one was literally exhausted by the emotions experienced in watching it, for there was no light relief and the realism was relentlessly sustained.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2018