Celia Simpson

Celia Simpson
Celia Simpson's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Spectator
Publications: The Spectator

movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet Dawn (1928) Miss Sybil Thorndike's performance is perfect, and the acting of the minor characters is on the same high level. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 10, 2019
100% The Circus (1928) The Circus is a magnificent film -- a mental tonic and a good hour's physical exercise. No one should miss it. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2018
No Score Yet Rango (1931) Unfortunately, the film has been fitted out with an insipid and superfluous prologue and a spasmodic running commentary. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
100% Chang: A Drama of the Wilderness (1927) The cinema has here brilliantly fulfilled a part for which it is better fitted than any other artistic medium. No book, painting, musical impression or circus could give so adequate and vivid a picture of the jungle. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
83% Blackmail (1929) Blackmail is a better combination of the silent motion picture technique and the talkie technique than any other film we have seen. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
98% Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (1927) There is nothing so very original about this rather sentimental plot, but the manner of its presentation is a welcome innovation. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
No Score Yet Baby ryazanskie (1927) A well- produced non-propaganda film, which might quite well be shown in London. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 15, 2018
No Score Yet Odinnadtsatyy (The Eleventh Year) (1928) I found it difficult to follow as there were no sub-titles for my interpreter to interpret for me, and we seemed to jump from the top of a crane to the pit of a coal mine with no obvious sequence. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2018
No Score Yet The End of St. Petersburg (1927) The Russians have certainly an eye for significant and symbolical detail in their cinema production. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2018
89% October (Ten Days that Shook the World) (1928) No book, picture or play could have given a more realistic impression of those days of bloodshed and horror: one was literally exhausted by the emotions experienced in watching it, for there was no light relief and the realism was relentlessly sustained. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2018