Chelsea Phillips-Carr Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Chelsea Phillips-Carr

Chelsea Phillips-Carr
Chelsea Phillips-Carr's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): National Post, PopMatters, Another Gaze, Cinema Scope, MUBI

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
37% I Love You, Daddy (2017) It's only an empty reflection on the abuse of power, which is just as focused on CK's self-proclaimed stature as a great comedian as it is about his regret for how his actions make him feel.‐ PopMatters
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2017
No Score Yet The Quiet Zone (2017) With an objectivity, which is too cold, and a disjointed style, The Quiet Zone does little to make its subject matter engaging.‐ POV Magazine
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
No Score Yet Hobbyhorse Revolution (2016) A compelling film on the phenomenon, Hobbyhorse Revolution celebrates its subject matter with enthusiasm, resulting in a doc which is both deeply moving and endlessly amusing.‐ POV Magazine
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
No Score Yet Ramen Heads (2017) Sweetly reverential and irresistibly eager, Ramen Heads is a heartfelt love-letter to ramen that can teach the world the joy of this dish.‐ POV Magazine
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
No Score Yet Life to Come (La vie à venir) (2015) Gorgeously shot and with great emotional depth, Life to Come is a satisfying and intense experience.‐ POV Magazine
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
2/10 86% Never Steady, Never Still (2017) ... paired with its lack of nuance in characters necessitating complexity, the film moves from formally boring to potentially offensive and absurd.‐ PopMatters
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
6/10 No Score Yet A Skin So Soft (Ta peau si lisse) (2017) While an overall beautiful and intelligent film, the humor, unfortunately, is in poor taste.‐ PopMatters
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
No Score Yet Do Donkeys Act? (2017) Do Donkeys Act is a remarkable work of anti-anthropocentrism, subverting human presumptions and power to glorify donkeys in a unique way.‐ POV Magazine
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
No Score Yet La Maison du Bonheur (2006) With absorbing narrative variety paired with great aesthetic unity, Maison du Bonheur reverentially depicts the significance of a feminine legacy.‐ POV Magazine
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
No Score Yet Les vies de Thérèse (2016) Never didactic, but never losing the importance of politics, Les Vies de Thérèse depicts death with vitality.‐ POV Magazine
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
94% Spettacolo (2017) Spettacolo is a charming film, aided greatly by the warm, rustic village in which it is set, as well as the passion of the people who put on their play.‐ POV Magazine
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
65% Victoria & Abdul (2017) Not content with a simple erasure of colonial violence under the veil of a feel-good prestige pic, Stephen Frears opts for full-on degradation in his latest film Victoria & Abdul.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
100% Sweet Country (2017) [Warwick] Thornton is exceptionally skilled at intertwining genre, formal innovation, and political revisionism; what finally undermines Sweet Country is that his skill does not extend to more fully depicting Aboriginal women.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
71% The Ritual (2017) The Ritual misses the mark: working in a longer format, [David Bruckner] comes up with a confused and unsustainable tangle of typical horror tropes.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
96% The Rider (2018) Beautiful, intelligent, and sensitive.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
87% Novitiate (2017) [Maggie] Betts might have made a great miniseries; instead, her film, while skillful, ultimately feels stilted.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
No Score Yet Luk'Luk'I (2017) An earnest attempt to bring social realities to the forefront amidst an onslaught of patriotic hypocrisies, Luk'Luk'I does not fully coalesce.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
92% A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer fantástica) (2018) [Sebastian] Lelio's film isn't perfect, but through [Daniela] Vega's presence, it does its best to give full cinematic agency to a woman traditionally marginalized.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
92% The Breadwinner (2017) The Breadwinner offers no respect or agency to real women; it's almost as if Twomey et al were consciously trying to set feminist postcolonial theory back by 20 years.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
18% The Time of Their Lives (2017) While The Time of Their Lives has its charm, the lack of kindness between its characters makes it a less than successful road trip film.‐ National Post
Read More | Posted Sep 21, 2017
2/10 94% The Shape of Water (2017) Rather than engaging with the genre in a meaningful way, [Guillermo] del Toro's film is boring, broad, and unoriginal, without any magic or charm.‐ PopMatters
Read More | Posted Sep 19, 2017
8/10 No Score Yet The Royal Hibiscus Hotel (2017) Fast-paced, funny, and sweet, The Royal Hibiscus Hotel proves that playing within genre doesn't have to result in a mediocre film.‐ PopMatters
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
9/10 100% Faces Places (Visages, villages) (2017) Faces Places is a wonderful film overall. But it is equally a refreshing counterpoint to the number of films about health, disability, and death that lack a tangible sense of understanding.‐ PopMatters
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
2/10 53% Redoubtable (Le redoutable) (2017) Choosing to ignore abuse, and taking away Anne's voice and agency in order to give a fuller view to Hazanavicius' beloved, Le Redoutable becomes much worse than a simple empty pastiche, verging into its own misogyny.‐ PopMatters
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
1/10 68% mother! (2017) While Aronofsky's artistry is at an all-time-low, it's his misogyny that makes the film abhorrent.‐ PopMatters
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
31% Mary Shelley (2017) The last moments of the film greatly diminish Mary Shelley's subversive critique.‐ Another Gaze
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
87% Wind River (2017) . . .when a film centres its plot around a radicalised socio-political problem but still focuses almost exclusively on white protagonists, its ability to provide an in-depth look at these issues is further diminished.‐ Another Gaze
Read More | Posted Aug 16, 2017
97% Menashe (2017) The end product is heartfelt yet complex, a story which is refreshing in its simultaneous narrative simplicity and psychological depth, but unfortunately it is just not very well made.‐ National Post
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
55% The Battleship Island (2017) Though Ryoo excels at both action narrative and harrowing history, the combination of the two feels strained.‐ National Post
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
89% Girls Trip (2017) Perhaps a cliché'd premise, but director Malcom D. Lee's Girls Trip manages to work with the well-worn narrative to create something fresh and fun.‐ National Post
Read More | Posted Jul 21, 2017
32% From the Land of the Moon (Mal de pierres) (2017) From the Land of the Moon's greatest crime is how boring it is.‐ National Post
Read More | Posted Jul 6, 2017