Chris Petit Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Chris Petit

Chris Petit
Chris Petit's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Time Out

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
43% Tracks (1976) The deeper it delves into symbolism, the more incoherent and hallucinatory it becomes.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2017
30% Two Minute Warning (1976) Efficient enough as formula suspense, but it fails to confront the implications of its subject, preferring instead evasiveness and fast cynicism to pull it through.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Sep 27, 2015
75% Oh! What A Lovely War (1969) An often too-clever, sometimes moving piece.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Aug 25, 2014
22% Diary of Forbidden Dreams (1973) All suitably throwaway, it's held together by our own curiosity and Polanski's obvious delight in observing such strange goings-on in rich summer villas.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2013
80% The Illumination (Iluminacja) (1973) The rapid editing and self-conscious technique is sometimes irritating, but more often proves sufficiently provocative to hold attention.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Jul 6, 2010
82% The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976) Roeg, often using a dazzling technical skill, jettisons narrative in favour of thematic juxtapositions, working best when exploring the clichés of social and cultural ritual.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2006
71% Hester Street (1975) An unimaginative camera and misty monochromes do little beyond conveying some self-conscious period recreation.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2006
70% Conan the Barbarian (1982) Match verdict: no goals, slow build-up, but much absorbing action off the ball.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2006
87% Triumph des Willens (Triumph Of The Will) (1935) Technically brilliant, and still one of the most disturbing pieces of propaganda around.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2006
75% Yol (The Way) (1982) The film's poetry, its combination of sound and image especially, has an unconscious innocence no longer available to most European and American narratives.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2006
97% Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975) Python's delightful and, on the whole, consistent reductio ad absurdum of the Grail legend.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2006
58% The Laughing Policeman (1973) By the end, complete with car chase and split-second shooting, the film has become indistinguishable from all those movies it's trying so hard to disown.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2006
93% The Sting (1973) The film ends up relying on different chapter headings to explain what's going on, but it's all very professional, with fine attention to period detail.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2006
91% The Graduate (1967) The film itself is very broken-backed, partly because Anne Bancroft's performance as the mother carries so much more weight than Katharine Ross' as the daughter, partly because Nichols couldn't decide whether he was making a social satire or a farce.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2006
82% Papillon (1973) With Schaffner unable to find the necessary perspective to prevent the film from becoming unevenly episodic, it ends up looking as if it were tacked together by at least three different directors.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2006
95% One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975) Set in an insane asylum, the film involves the oppression of the individual, a struggle spearheaded by an ebullient Nicholson, turning in a star performance if ever there was one.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Feb 11, 2006
88% The Muppet Movie (1979) Slapstick chases and weak movie references look tired, while the attitude towards Miss Piggy and Camilla the Chicken is, well, less than progressive.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2006
90% Spirits of the Dead (1969) Only Fellini (Toby Dammit) really manages to make much of his source.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2006
91% The Sugarland Express (1974) A beautifully put together, assured film.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2006
90% The Magnificent Seven (1960) Sturges' remake of Kurosawa's Seven Samurai is always worth a look, mainly for the performances of McQueen, Bronson, Coburn and Vaughn.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2006
67% The Quiller Memorandum (1966) Although the whole thing is ill-served by Michael Anderson's direction, it remains perversely likeable precisely because it is rather long-winded and enigmatic.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2006
86% Three Days of the Condor (1975) The action rarely falters, and at its best the film offers an intriguing slice of neo-Hitchcock.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2006
79% The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) The film has its moments -- Kiel's indestructible heavy racks up a good score -- but the rest is desperately weak.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2006
33% Telefon (1977) Most disappointing is Siegel's contribution: he, of all directors, should have been able to inject some life into the proceedings, but this is his most nondescript outing in years.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2006
81% The Gauntlet (1977) A major source of amusement is watching Eastwood the director leaving Eastwood the actor barely in control throughout. Eastwood's Annie Hall?‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2006
91% The Dirty Dozen (1967) Overriding such nihilism is the super-crudity of Aldrich's energy and his humour, sufficiently cynical to suggest that the whole thing is a game anyway, a spectacle that demands an audience.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2006
91% Network (1976) Slick, 'adult', self-congratulatory, and almost entirely hollow.‐ Time Out
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2006