Clyde Gilmour

Clyde Gilmour
Clyde Gilmour's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer® when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Maclean's Magazine Toronto Star
Biography:
(Photo Credit: Frank Lennon/Toronto Star/Getty Images)

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
81% The Man With the Golden Arm (1955) The earthly purgatory of a drug addict (sensitively portrayed by Frank Sinatra) adds up to a strong and shocking movie, although the bitter ending of Nelson Algren's novel has been sugared for the screen. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 22, 2020
78% Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954) A prehistoric man shaped fish falls in love with screaming Julia Adams in an Amazon backwater, but his courtship is a failure. So is the movie. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 12, 2020
75% Cyrano de Bergerac (1950) The magnificent acting of José Ferrer and the clarion rhetoric of Edmond Rostand's semi-classic drama are not quite enough to conceal the central weaknesses of the story. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 2, 2020
79% The Bad and the Beautiful (1953) Although a good deal less penetrating in its close-up of "the real Hollywood" than it pretends to be, this is a smooth and enjoyable comedy-drama. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2020
56% St. Louis Blues (1958) A disappointing screen biography of the late W. C. Handy, the father of the blues, with a thin and bloodless story and not even a generous amount of music by way of compensation. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2020
17% Untamed Frontier (1952) Nice color photography and a honey of a stampede are assets to be weighed against a garrulous script and several wooden characters in this cow-country drama. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted May 7, 2020
100% Winchester '73 (1950) A good western. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 15, 2020
97% Born Yesterday (1950) An excellent comedy, equally gratifying to the funnybone and the intelligence of an adult audience. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2020
50% Flower Drum Song (1961) Like most of the Rodgers-and-Hammerstcin musicals, this one probably is headed for success at the movie box-office, but in honest warmth and melodic appeal it compares weakly with its predecessors. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2020
66% Pandora and the Flying Dutchman (1951) Ava Gardner never looked lovelier, and two hours and three minutes never seemed longer, than in this pretentious semi-mystic romance. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 21, 2020
No Score Yet Just My Luck (1957) Norman Wisdom in a strained and noisy racetrack farce from Britain. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet God's Little Acre (1958) As Ty Ty, the head of the clan, Robert Ryan gives the best performance of his career. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
81% Gigi (1958) The excellent cast also includes Maurice Chevalier and Isabel Jeans. The songs are pleasant, although nobody in the film ever quite gets around to singing them in full voice. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet The Seven Hills of Rome (1958) I don't happen to enjoy Mario Lanza's brand of hammy, self-infatuated vocalism, and his acting is much worse than his singing. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
95% Paths of Glory (1957) Customers impatient of anything but escapist entertainment on the screen may be harshly jolted by this bleak and powerful antimilitarism drama. For less narrow viewers, it s a picture that should not be missed. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet Merry Andrew (1958) The new Danny Kaye comedy isn't the best he has ever done but it's a genial and funny show. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
57% The Student Prince (1954) The prince's tenor voice actually belongs to the invisible Mario Lanza. His top notes sound a bit strained now, but the schmaltzy old songs are still hummable. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
40% The High and the Mighty (1954) There is plenty of tension toward the finish of this widely-read tale...but most of the characters are banal "types," what they say is often uncomfortably corny... - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
100% The Golden Coach (Le Carrosse d'or) (1953) Italy's high-voltage actress Anna Magnani and French director Jean Renoir join forces in a confused but lively and enjoyable farce-fantasy. The fanciful plot defies synopsis here. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet The Final Test (1954) A pleasant, although sometimes faltering, comedy from Britain...Robert Morley is very funny as a spluttery intellectual who takes the boy in hand. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
99% On the Waterfront (1954) A superb director (Elia Kazan) and a hard-hitting writer (Budd Schulberg ) have come up with a powerful and fascinating study of lawless violence... - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet You Can't Run Away From It (1956) A noisy but halfhearted remake of 1934's famed Oscar winner, It Happened One Night... - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet The Girl He Left Behind (1956) There are a few quite funny moments in this American army comedy. Most of it, though, is embarrassingly coy and contrived. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
93% Giant (1956) Edna Ferber's sprawling yarn about life in Texas has its share of corn, and so has the film, but master director George Stevens has put it all together with vitality and insight. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet The Brave One (1956) An overlong but beautiful and stirring drama... - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
69% Around the World in 80 Days (1956) Jules Verne's comedy-adventure about a trip encircling the globe in 1872 has been turned into a richly entertaining three-ring circus of a movie... - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet Lydia Bailey (1952) A tepid romance is outweighed by some spectacular action in this enjoyable adventure yarn. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet Lady Godiva (1955) Uneven in style, but entertaining, with a wonderful bit by Alastair Sim as a frustrated but philosophical film producer. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet His Excellency the Shop Assistant (1933) What should have been a fascinating climax is weakened by a lot of muddled semiflashbacks; but the story is a good one and the cast is excellent, especially Cecil Parker as the governor's suave adviser. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
47% The Greatest Show on Earth (1952) Director Cecil B. deMille, an all-star cast, and the world's biggest circus . . . and the result, to me at least, is mainly a great crashing bore in spite of a few exhilarating moments. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet The Galloping Major (1951) Funny in spots, but hardly up to the level of its yeasty predecessors. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet Boots Malone (1952) Few racetrack movies have been more solidly interesting than this one... - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet Anything Can Happen (1952) Both touching and hilarious...pleasant comedy. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet The People Against O'Hara (1951) It's a bit lumbering in pace, but decent and unpretentious, and some of the minor roles are unusually well-acted. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet Jim Thorpe---All American (1951) Burt Lancaster in a rather slow but interesting bio... physically at least, [he] re-creates the mighty Thorpe with considerable vividness... - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
75% Detective Story (1951) Sidney Kingsley's hard-hitting Broadway drama about life in a big-town police station has been expertly filmed by William Wyler. The result is muscular entertainment for adults. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet The Blue Veil (1951) A rambling, old-fashioned tear-jerker... - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
83% Angels in the Outfield (1951) A baseball comedy, mildly amusing one moment and heavy-handed the next. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
96% An American in Paris (1951) Hollywood hasn't turned out a better musical in years. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
67% Until They Sail (1957) Better than most of the soap operas it resembles, this tells of the wartime romances and heartaches of four New Zealand sisters and says one or two uncommonly blunt things... - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 7, 2020
No Score Yet A Hill in Korea (Hell in Korea) (1956) With a gratifying minimum of both ultra-heroics and matey service humor, this British war drama absorbingly recreates the minuteby-minute ordeal of a small patrol trapped by the enemy in Korea. The non-celebrity cast does its work with unassuming skill. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 7, 2020
No Score Yet Campbell's Kingdom (1957) There are several big holes in the story but a steadily mounting tension and a spectacular action climax offer considerable compensation. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 7, 2020
80% Pal Joey (1957) ...Frank Sinatra's confident and amusing performance as singer and actor makes the picture worth seeing. The music, by Rodgers & Hart, is also beguiling. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 7, 2020
100% The Man Who Never Was (1956) A superior spy thriller, based on Ewen Montagu's true story... - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 7, 2020
100% The Ladykillers (1955) Alec Guinness is somewhat less believable than usual in this fast and ruthless British crime comedy. But Katie Johnson is nothing short of perfect as a prim old widow whose gentility terrifies the gang. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 7, 2020
No Score Yet The Benny Goodman Story (1956) Dull in the drama department, this hi-fi tribute to America's King of Swing is nonetheless recommended for jazz enthusiasts. TV's Steve Allen impersonates BG. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 7, 2020
84% Richard III (1956) Olivier's title-role performance is a triumph of subtlety and venom, and his surrounding cast is virtually an Honors List of the British legitimate theatre. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 7, 2020
No Score Yet Gigot (1962) Not mutton but ham was the meat that kept floating past my eyes while watching Jackie Gleason groping around for an Oscar in the Paris gutters. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 7, 2020
97% Stalag 17 (1953) A raucous, cynical but compelling comedy-drama about the life led by American soldiers in a German prison camp in 1944. Not recommended for the kiddies. - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 7, 2020
97% Shane (1953) Director George Stevens and writer A. B. Guthrie Jr. have fashioned one of the best of all the Hollywood westerns... - Maclean's Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 7, 2020