Craig MathiesonMovie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Craig Mathieson

Craig Mathieson
Craig Mathieson's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Age (Australia), sbs.com.au, The Sunday Age

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3.5/5 89% Neon Bull (Boi Neon) (2016) The documentary filmmaking background of Brazilian director Gabriel Mascaro informs much of his second dramatic feature, which ventures deep without judgment or undue instigation into the lives of a group of itinerant rodeo workers ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 27, 2016
3/5 91% Southside With You (2016) They end up seeing Spike Lee's revelatory Do the Right Thing, and the history in moments such as that give weight to Richard Tanne's sweet, sturdy romantic drama ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 27, 2016
4/5 94% Arrival (2016) Most aliens-on-Earth movies move towards destruction, usually of the planet-wide kind, but the crux of Arrival is creation: the writing of a word, the beginning of a bond, the start of a life. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 27, 2016
2.5/5 86% Hacksaw Ridge (2016) War truly is hell in this World War II biographical drama as the film's subject, decorated combat medic and pacifist Desmond Doss (Andrew Garfield), is caught up in horrific carnage that can outweigh the storytelling. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 27, 2016
3.5/5 60% The Light Between Oceans (2016) What Cianfrance can't do is find a definitive ending: the film has at least three as it builds to a high pitch and thus runs long. But along the way it's passionately gripping and much more than the cliche of a tear-jerking romance. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 27, 2016
2/5 51% The Accountant (2016) Director Gavin O'Connor has made some tough, decent dramas about the frayed bonds of family and subcultures, but it takes ludicrous steps to get The Accountant down to that fundamental level, and once there the film barely registers. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 27, 2016
3/5 90% Doctor Strange (2016) For all the talk of alternate dimensions and sightings of a bald Tilda Swinton, Scott Derrickson's film is a sturdy addition to the superhero saga that's been slotting in compatible pieces since Iron Man delivered its first wisecrack in 2008. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 27, 2016
3.5/5 No Score Yet Barash (2015) The visual textures are adroitly familiar, but the director never loses track of his two leads: the sex scene between the two young women tumbles through often contradictory moods and their distinct uncertainty before capturing their pleasure together. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 9, 2016
2/5 19% Keeping Up With The Joneses (2016) Despite being directed by Gregg Mottola (Superbad, Paul), the comic scenes play out with often banal interplay that barely has a whiff of improvised mayhem, while the action sequences are essentially generic. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 9, 2016
2.5/5 83% Oasis: Supersonic (2016) By eschewing cultural context, outside voices, or songwriting analysis, the film matches the group's insular arrogance, although there's genuine insight into the family dynamic. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 9, 2016
3.5/5 97% Heart of a Dog (2015) Imagery and philosophy circle back and then veer forward, but it's a perceptive work that finds a transformative power in genuine sadness. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 9, 2016
2.5/5 31% Masterminds (2016) The matter-of-fact oddball air of television sketch comedy predominates, which makes for a wacky movie but another perfect turn, as David's fiancee Jandice, from Kate McKinnon ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 9, 2016
4/5 57% The Neon Demon (2016) The Neon Demon is a gender-flipped twin to Refn's last movie, the dreamy Bangkok ultraviolence of 2013's Only God Forgives. That film turned the male mindset into a self-destructive celebration, and now he's made the female equivalent. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 9, 2016
2.5/5 37% Jack Reacher: Never Go Back (2016) This sequel to the bare-fisted 2012 action film that featured Tom Cruise as a lone, lean force of American nature corrects several failings from the original Jack Reacher. The problem is it also loses some of the original's better qualities. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 9, 2016
3/5 91% Zero Days (2016) [Gibney's] reveal is that one nation altered the [Stuxnet] code, which revealed it to other countries, which are now growing their unchecked cyber warfare capabilities. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 9, 2016
4/5 94% The Handmaiden (Ah-ga-ssi) (2016) Narratively complex and scabrously amusing, The Handmaiden remakes the period epic into a study of personal power told through both sexual and colonial politics and batty heist flick diversions. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 9, 2016
3/5 70% CafĂ© Society (2016) Cafe Society reaches back into the past because [Woody Allen] wants to capture the nagging, ungraspable growth of lifelong regret. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 9, 2016
3.5/5 No Score Yet The Baulkham Hills African Ladies Troupe (2016) The documentary removes cliches that surround the African community to reveal individuals, makes clear the humanitarian need to accept refugees, and shows the deep, soulful value of engaging with the arts. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 9, 2016
4/5 98% Under The Shadow (2016) The debut feature from Iranian-born and British-based filmmaker Babak Anvari is an excellent mix of political repression, maternal dread, and suggestive myth. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 9, 2016
2.5.5 43% The Girl on the Train (2016) The more the film goes on, becoming a thriller spiked with moments of lurid excess, the less compelling it is. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 9, 2016
3.5/5 82% Julieta (2016) Divining the bond between mothers and daughters, which in his movies can be broken but never banished, Almodovar is renewed. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Dec 9, 2016
3/5 100% Wednesday, May 9 (Chaharshanbeh, 19 Ordibehesht) (2015) Told with a trademark Iranian naturalism by first-time director Vahid Jalilvand, each of the trio of participants whose lives are uncovered offer a window into both contemporary Iranian circumstances and the ubiquity of regret. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Oct 6, 2016
3/5 64% Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (2016) There are clashes both small and spectacular throughout this fantasy adventure but the crucial one is between the film's director, Tim Burton, and the bland demands of the modern blockbuster. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Oct 1, 2016
4/5 81% Chevalier (2016) The movie evokes a detailed, deadpan state of being, refusing to allow for sympathy as the games grow ever more intense and recriminations take hold. What is Tsangari's underlying metaphor? Take your pick, but this is bracing filmmaking. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Oct 1, 2016
3.5/5 No Score Yet Early Winter (2015) Locked-off cameras that refuse to direct the audience's attention shape a film where the difference between diffidence and deceit could be non-existent ... [Michael] Rowe reveals how relationships, however solid, are prey to their own intractability. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Oct 1, 2016
3.5/5 91% The Red Turtle (La tortue rouge) (2017) Dudok de Wit's sparse work acquires the power of a fable, leaping years and revealing images that have the timeless power of cave drawings. The final scenes are resolutely simple but deeply powerful, encapsulating life's passage. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 27, 2016
3/5 93% Life, Animated (2016) A great affirmation about a real-life lost boy who found his way into the wider world through his love for Disney's animated canon. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 27, 2016
3.5/5 81% Equity (2016) Meera Menon's​ coolly framed compositions reveal how the "pure American desire" of corporate success is weighted against them. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 27, 2016
3/5 93% I Am Not a Serial Killer (2016) The humour is bleak, but [Max] Records, one-time star of Where the Wild Things Are, gives the movie a compelling centre before it changes tack once again. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 27, 2016
3.5/5 61% Snowden (2016) Snowden is the best film Oliver Stone has made in at least two decades. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 19, 2016
3.5/5 97% Mapplethorpe: Look at the Pictures (2016) The focus of this documentary is the work and life - the former overwhelmed the latter - of iconoclastic American photographer Robert Mapplethorpe. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 19, 2016
2/5 20% Yoga Hosers (2016) Kevin Smith goes back to the fluoro-lit convenience store with this tepid teen horror-comedy that plays out as a grab-bag of self-referential jokes and friendly indulgences stretched beyond breaking point. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 19, 2016
3.5/5 86% Pete's Dragon (2016) The result is unusually small and surprisingly genuine for a modern Disney production. The film values friendship, but also acknowledges trauma. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 13, 2016
2.5/5 74% The Secret Life of Pets (2016) It features a brisk four-legged adventure, some knowing jokes pitched at the adults in the audience, and the surreptitious belief that cats have sociopathic tendencies. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 13, 2016
4/5 92% Summertime (La Belle Saison) (2016) The story treats each character with valid consideration, so that there's no simple resolution. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 13, 2016
4/5 94% Wanda (1971) It now plays as a ground-breaking work of personal cinema with an aesthetic that deserves to be [Barbara] Loden's enduring signature. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 13, 2016
3/5 89% The Queen of Ireland (2015) The filmmaking is workmanlike, but many of the ideas explored are sharp: drag queens like Panti, one observer notes, take the fear of effeminacy and turn it into a strength that is celebrated. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 13, 2016
4/5 82% Captain Fantastic (2016) It helps immeasurably that Ben is played by [Viggo] Mortensen, who with his greying beard and watchful gaze, makes you aware of how deeply powerful - and possibly distorting - the act of nurturing a cherished child is. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 13, 2016
4/5 97% Weiner (2016) Elyse Steinberg and Josh Kriegman's documentary may well be the ultimate political experience, capturing in excruciating detail the hopeful comeback and disastrous second defeat of former US Congressman Anthony Weiner. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 13, 2016
3/5 93% My Scientology Movie (2017) Theroux gets the blowback he hopes for with overt surveillance and bizarre confrontations that are as comically illogical as they are creepily threatening. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 13, 2016
2.5/5 72% The Carer (2015) A dyspeptic comedy that quickly gives in to sentimentality ... any dramatic tension dissolves into tepid manipulation. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Sep 13, 2016
3.5/5 81% Sunset Song (2016) The structure can be episodic at times but the strength of Sunset Song is in its cumulative power. It reveals a soulful outlook that, like the cherished land, endures. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Aug 31, 2016
2.5/5 66% David Brent: Life on the Road (2017) The sight of David Brent shilling for forgiveness and empathy, and blatantly receiving it, is the kind of development the once incorrigible Ricky Gervais - an unforgiving comic voice and scourge of the Golden Globes - would have ripped to shreds. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Aug 31, 2016
3/5 70% A Hologram for the King (2016) The movie, an adaptation of Dave Eggers' 2012 novel of the same name, captures the mercenary basis of corporate culture and Tykwer's love for the visual information conveyed by architecture, but it narrows in scope quickly as romance takes hold. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Aug 31, 2016
2.5/5 60% War Dogs (2016) Phillips keeps shooting his characters in tight pairings, as if searching for tension, but the story lacks momentum and it only really comes alive through the performance of [Jonah] Hill. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Aug 31, 2016
2/5 25% Ben-Hur (2016) The brief scenes with a handsome woodworker, aka Jesus Christ (Rodrigo Santoro), are staggeringly banal, reductive in both religious and cinematic faith. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Aug 31, 2016
3/5 61% High-Rise (2016) Wheatley's camera repeatedly dollies in towards Laing, as if pursuing something it can't catch, and that forlorn quest is an elevator ride to the top of High-Rise that never arrives. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Aug 31, 2016
2.5/5 78% The Shallows (2016) This survival thriller about a surfer precariously trapped just offshore by a predatory shark lacks one essential element: a performance motivated by a genuine lust for life from star Blake Lively. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Aug 31, 2016
3.5/5 95% Tickled (2016) The story's spine is so magnetic that you're held tight until the quiet but conclusive finale. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Aug 31, 2016
3.5/5 82% Indignation (2016) A coming-of-age tale from another era, one whose rules, obligations and constraints prove to be wryly comic and ultimately tragic. ‐ The Sunday Age
Posted Aug 16, 2016