Craig Mathieson

Craig Mathieson
Craig Mathieson's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Age (Australia) sbs.com.au The Sunday Age

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
3/5 89% 1917 (2020) The figure whose sense of overbearing control is palpable here is not any general but Sam Mendes himself. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 11, 2020
5/5 97% Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Portrait de la jeune fille en feu) (2020) A spellbinding cinematic romance where constraint shadows hope and a harsh ending threatens from the tender beginning. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 29, 2019
3/5 52% Charlie's Angels (2019) [Kristen] Stewart has movie star diffidence ... Her Sabina makes an entrance and makes a crack with equal ease. Bonus quality: every time Stewart sits down or leans against a bench she looks like an icon on down time. Long may she recline. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2019
4/5 92% Ford v Ferrari (2019) Call it The Fast and the Curious. Director James Mangold's ability to infuse unexpected detail and emotional relevance into familiar genres shines through in this automotive drama. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2019
2/5 68% Zombieland: Double Tap (2019) The zombies that sprint into the frame may have got faster and more cunning, but the movie itself is now slow and cumbersome. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 21, 2019
4/5 87% Hustlers (2019) Jennifer Lopez isn't just alluring, she's also armoured. Introduced publicly dancing to Fiona Apple's 'Criminal', and then privately reclining in a fur coat on a rooftop like a goddess on a cigarette break, she is a force of nature. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
3/5 55% The Dead Don't Die (2019) What partially separates The Dead Don't Die from Jarmusch's back catalogue is that he doesn't actually dig into the genre and its philosophy. There are references, but little remaking of history or implied heresy - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
2/5 24% The Goldfinch (2019) Hobie deals in "antique American furniture." That's what this film is: an already dated take on the tasteful arthouse movie; a Dickensian tale that aspires to the translations once crafted by Merchant Ivory. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
3/5 87% The Nightingale (2019) Eschewing the breadth of a wide-screen frame, writer and director Jennifer Kent shows colonialism as an act of destruction, whether on a public or private scale. It warps everyone connected to it or merely present. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
3/5 85% Once Upon a Time In Hollywood (2019) Pitt is a model of movie star cool, economical but sure in every movement, and unwilling to back down. Naturally he's playing someone who thinks the idea of being a movie star is ludicrous. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
4/5 89% Diego Maradona (2019) Kapadia stays close to Maradona: game footage is always shot from ground level, as if you're standing just behind the goal Maradona is trying to thump the ball into. It emphasises the casual brutality of the game, and the vast emotional stakes. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
4/5 99% Parasite (Gisaengchung) (2019) Bong builds the tension with sequences that could be worthy of Hitchcock, with their sharp tension and biting outcomes. But the filmmaking always exerts a moral awareness on the increasingly rushed and angry bodies. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
2/5 23% Men in Black International (2019) In a time of over-processed blockbusters, this should be a knowing diversion: flippant, unexpected, gruesome even. You keep waiting for the story to put down a marker and set the characters free, but it never happens. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
2/5 42% Godzilla: King of the Monsters (2019) The film even has two comic relief archetypes: Bradley Whitford as the freaked-out white scientist and O'Shea Jackson Jr as the phlegmatic black soldier ... Everyone - and everything - in this film is reduced to their basic tenets - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
3/5 90% John Wick: Chapter 3 - Parabellum (2019) There are flickers of determination and moments of exhausted disdain, but whether killing his opponents or asking former allies for help, Reeves is so self-contained that somewhere Lee Marvin is offering a slow clap of acknowledgement. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
3/5 94% Avengers: Endgame (2019) Nonetheless, there are a lot of second chances attached to this full stop, and as has usually been the case they're solidly sold. The writing captures individual voices far better than Infinity War did, and the ending is conclusive. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
2/5 27% The Aftermath (2019) What happens rarely feels deeply engaged, instead adhering to what expectation demands from a story where two beautiful actors begin as adversaries and become romantically intertwined. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
3/5 92% Fighting with My Family (2019) The structure is so conventional and the tropes so familiar that the story presents a training montage set to "Taking Care of Business" with earnest intent. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
3/5 78% Captain Marvel (2019) What makes the film work is that a woman claiming her identity from a life that's told her otherwise is explicitly feminist, and when Captain Marvel asserts herself it's not just with noble intent but also galvanising pleasure. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
3/5 60% Greta (2019) In Greta, a wind-up toy of a horror film that wants for an insidious purpose, Isabelle Huppert goes full psychopath: there's the serenely sinister smile, the looming intimacy, and the sudden flick to rage-filled demands. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
2/5 34% King of Thieves (2019) These esteemed British actors are plotting a heist and indulging in some choice Cockney slang - if you've ever wanted to see Jim Broadbent smash a chair and menace an associate with the debris, this is your movie. - Flicks.com.au EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
3/5 83% The Other Side of the Wind (2018) But even a compromised Orson Welles film is a welcome release. It's far from exemplary, but nonetheless fascinating in parts and instructive of how Welles saw his career and the movie industry. - The Monthly (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2019
4/5 89% John McEnroe: In the Realm of Perfection (L'empire de la perfection) (2018) The only tennis documentary to set Sonic Youth's cyberpunk ode The Sprawl to a technique montage, Julien Faraut's wonderfully original film mixes film theory, cryptic analysis, and multiple break(ing) points to form a coolly intoxicating examination. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2019
3.5/5 89% Arctic (2019) In an immersive environment, Mikkelsen's performance begins with his body's actions but obtains a reverence through his gaze - he shows us what it's like to look out and see nothing but your own oblivion. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2019
3.5/5 95% Lots of Kids, a Monkey and a Castle (Muchos hijos, un mono y un castillo) (2017) Predicated on a rhythm built up over decades, mother and son are filmed debating how the film should be made, and as more family members arrive screwball chaos takes hold. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2019
4/5 86% Let the Sunshine In (Un beau soleil intérieur) (2018) The filmmaker and her character are equally untethered, enquiring women, not so much concerned with securing a definitive answer as engaging with the possibilities raised by their searches. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2019
4/5 100% Minding the Gap (2018) As tender as it is demanding, this Sundance Film Festival winner is a striking portrait of American lives and fractured masculinity. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2019
4.5/5 93% First Reformed (2018) So many of Paul Schrader's screenplays are debates about belief, but never have they been as starkly free of extraneous concerns as this unexpected late career masterpiece is. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 23, 2018
3.5/5 94% The Wild Pear Tree (Ahlat agaci) (2019) The Turkish auteur's new work is expansive in length, but in this instance it also has the spark of (contrarian) youth and a prickly sense of humour. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 23, 2018
3.5/5 98% Ryuichi Sakamoto: Coda (2018) There may not be enough conventional reference to the subject's life - marriages, children, and career - but that's because the film is unafraid to suggest that Sakamoto's music is his life. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 23, 2018
3.5/5 91% The Ballad of Buster Scruggs (2018) The Coens have used the anthology structure to not just tell a spread of stories but also chart a transition from the ridiculous to the sublime: the codes of the Western are first mocked and then dissected. - The Monthly (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2018
4.5/5 96% Roma (2018) Roma makes the vast feel granular, while allowing an extended family's travails to illustrate a nation's fractious clashes. Its seamlessness is masterful, the resulting vision compelling. - The Monthly (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2018
3.5/5 93% Kusama: Infinity (2018) Heather Lenz's documentary, which runs through the subject's eventful life at a chronological clip, is respectful of Kusama, never imposing too closely on what was a difficult dedication to her obsessive artistic practice. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2018
3.5/5 90% Studio 54 (2018) The rise was meteoric, and the fall painful, with Schrager, who would go on to master the boutique hotel, discussing for the first time the mix of youthful ambition and greed that started to suggest a Martin Scorsese movie. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 10, 2018
2.5/5 20% A Cool Fish (2018) A mix of parallel missteps offset by hard but unassuming social commentary that slowly comes to the fore even as the improbable storylines are tied together. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 8, 2018
3/5 83% Puzzle (2018) It's a showcase for Macdonald, and 22 years on from Trainspotting the Scottish actress displays a mixture of soulful struggle and defiant will to change. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 8, 2018
3.5/5 93% Sorry to Bother You (2018) The awkwardness in Riley's filmmaking suits the mood, but while there are brilliantly sharp moments - particularly Cassius' improvised rap to wealthy partygoers - there are misses too. The narrow tone also leaves a hint of inertia, despite the broadsides. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 26, 2018
3.5/5 No Score Yet Bastardy (2008) Turns the city's landscape and cultural memory upside down as it tracks the life of the Indigenous stage and screen actor Jack Charles (The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith), who was also gay, a cat burglar, and a long-term heroin addict. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 26, 2018
3/5 59% You Might Be the Killer (2018) A blood-soaked American recreation of a summer camp slaughter - first to arrive adult counsellors only - that hits all the genre's marks even as it drily sends up the masked killer, his archetypal victims, and harried target. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 26, 2018
4/5 100% Strange Colours (2018) From the quietly exhilarating first cut - the pristine night sky above to an otherworldly mechanical excavation below ground - Strange Colours reveals a natural filmmaker who brings her own vision to the Australian landscape. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2018
3.5/5 93% CAM (2018) As a metaphor it's disquieting, but the telling - with its Cronenberg-like screens, nightmarish brightness, and probing cinematography - makes it throb with uneasy energy. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2018
4.5/5 99% Shoplifters (Manbiki kazoku) (2018) Observed with tender, telling detail, their lives spill out of the overcrowded home in much the same way that a need for caring and connection spills out from their hearts. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 12, 2018
4/5 81% Chappaquiddick (2018) Events are economically detailed, and the hypocrisy is revealed through not just the lowest of deeds, but the failure to hit heights so nobly articulated. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 12, 2018
3/5 No Score Yet Sly (Marmouz) (2018) "A candidate so able brings oil to your table," is one of his slogans, and there's a recurring line of cynical insiders who imagine they can control the self-important populist. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 21, 2018
3.5/5 88% Love, Gilda (2018) The film's success is to contain a multitude of facets that informed her personal life while capturing her genius as a public performer. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 21, 2018
4/5 89% Donbass (2018) Ukrainian filmmaker Sergei Loznitsa couches his bleak humour in documentary-like settings to create an environment that is unsettling and increasingly warped by its own logic. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2018
3.5/5 93% The Cleaners (2018) Filmmakers Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck reveal a hidden view of the withering, worrying power of behemoth social media platforms with this documentary about the online clean-up crews who endlessly decide between deleting or ignoring disputed content. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2018
4/5 100% Wajib (2017) Grounded in locations that speak to the broader realities and personal differences in philosophy, the film has wry warmth and unexpected differences. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2018
3/5 No Score Yet Guilty (2017) The film disputes the punishment, not Sukamaran's guilt, capturing the disconnection between the banal preparations for the killing of the 34-year-old and his final acts of creativity. - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2018
4/5 92% A Prayer Before Dawn (2018) Part Rocky, part Midnight Express, and part Beau Travail, this adaptation of Billy Moore's best-selling memoir about his three years in some of Thailand's most infamous jails is a harshly immersive experience - The Sunday Age EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 4, 2018