Craig Mathieson Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Craig Mathieson

Craig Mathieson
Craig Mathieson's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Age (Australia), sbs.com.au, The Sunday Age

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3.5/5 100% Primaire (2016) A timely reminder of how a child's education is crucially connected to their teacher, this French drama turns a primary school classroom into a kinetic learning space where the one adult nurtures, encourages and above all believes ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
3/5 73% Believer (2018) These gangsters prove, almost without fail, to be homicidal monsters, and director Lee Hae-young (The Silenced) is as likely to celebrate their excess as he is to frame it as a failing.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
3/5 No Score Yet Food Fighter (2018) Dan Goldberg's film is tied to Kahn's cheerfully indomitable personality - it has her engaging spark and dedication. But at points it gets so swept up in Kahn's mission, that it doesn't fully examine its subject.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2018
3/5 84% Lost in Paris (Paris pieds nus) (2017) You can pick out the influences, but the set pieces are so charming, particularly a scene where a rogue bass throb hiccups through a restaurant and gets the stars both dancing together and falling in love, that you'll willingly submit.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2018
3/5 87% My Friend Dahmer (2017) The movie is best as a study of teenage enthusiasm and exploitation, charting his association with a trio of anarchic classmates - including John Backderf (Alex Wolff), whose graphic novel is the film's source text - who stoke his antisocial stunts.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2018
3/5 No Score Yet Monkey Business: The Adventures of Curious George's Creators (2017) Narrated by Sam Waterston, Ema Ryan Yamazaki's documentary is an affectionate portrait of a couple - she was mischievous, he was curious - who never lost their interest in the world, or connection to each other.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2018
3/5 100% Between Land and Sea (2016) The cultural shift onshore isn't closely examined, but when the action moves into the water the attraction of the waves is eloquently established by cinematographer Kevin Smith.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2018
3/5 100% The Cakemaker (2018) But in helping Anat, Thomas fails to reveal his connection to her husband. It's a decision that is balanced between grief and jealousy, and the film itself must traverse an equally divided path between emotional duress and social critique‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 21, 2018
2.5/5 56% Crooked House (2017) You could read the film as a study of familial wealth and corruption, but it's happiest at a formal dinner where the insults - Downton Abbey's Julian Fellowes is a screenwriter - have a snobbish sting.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 21, 2018
4/5 98% BPM (Beats Per Minute) (120 battements par minute) (2017) The storytelling not only has an immediacy, it matches issues to individuals so that the campaigning is never merely about the public profile.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 13, 2018
3/5 89% Bye Bye Germany (Es war einmal in Deutschland...) (2018) The dodges of the salesmen, who are selling to Germans who previously ignored their extermination, suggests Barry Levinson's Tin Men, and there's a dyspeptic comic lining to how these men focus on business.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 13, 2018
3.5/5 95% Outside In (2018) It merely entangles Chris and Carol in unworkable circumstances, which Shelton opens up with a deftly portrayed supporting cast, hardscrabble imagery, and reckonings that mostly emerge from empathy.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 12, 2018
3/5 86% Midnight Oil 1984 (2018) The uncertainty his efforts created internally are sympathetically treated in the contemporary interviews, but it would have been of value to draw out further questions of fandom and policy's interaction. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 12, 2018
3.5/5 77% No Stone Unturned (2017) The film shows how corruption spreads outwards from supposedly righteous causes. The factual storytelling is strong, but Gibney's eye for stylised recreations is both ripe and unnecessary.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 23, 2018
3.5/5 96% Marlina the Murderer in Four Acts (2018) Shot through with evocative compositions, from menacingly framed interiors to wide-screen landscapes that can never quite contain the anger unleashed, Mouly Surya's sparse revenge tale is a genre piece given regional specificity‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 23, 2018
4/5 100% I Am Not a Witch (2017) Nyoni not only captures the absurdist processes of this world, with men delivering verdicts on the women, she frames it with compositions that capture both the fierce spirit of her protagonist and the ludicrous situation she must make the best of.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 23, 2018
3/5 100% Scream for Me Sarajevo (2017) It's a story that emphasises the sudden shocking reality of war ("the normal life you had was gone," recalls one local), and the value of recognition and respite. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 15, 2018
3/5 90% Pop Aye (2017) Their episodic journey, punctuated by momentary danger and bittersweet encounters, moves at Pop Aye's pace, but in writer/director Kirsten Tan's debut feature there's a steady accretion of defining information.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 9, 2018
3.5/5 80% Scaffolding (2017) From the unexpectedly cool colour palette to the observations on class and Jewish immigration, writer/director Matan Yair's worthy coming of age drama manages to reveal contemporary Israel in a different light.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 1, 2018
3/5 No Score Yet Discover Arts: Hitler Vs Picasso (2018) This Italian documentary - presented with wary historic perspective by the actor Toni Servillo - diligently details how the fascist beliefs of Adolf Hitler and his Nazi regime clashed with the creative breadth of modern art in the 1930s.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 1, 2018
3.5/5 96% 1945 (2017) The heat haze and looming tension suggest a showdown in a western, but the weight of recent history applies its own vengeance, one that's transferred to the next generation.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2018
3/5 No Score Yet The Space in Between: Marina Abramovic and Brazil (2016) Her performance space facade is put aside, with the Serbian artist serving as narrator and host for a journey that is at turns an awkward spiritual quest, a tilt at self-revelation, and the strangest lifestyle travel show you've ever seen.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2018
3/5 100% Pecking Order (2017) Slavko Martinov's film also speaks to the very real value of community groups and the trickiness in maintaining traditional interests in the 21st century.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2018
3.5/5 96% The Endless (2018) The monsters here include the repetitive rigour of late-era capitalism and Lovecraftian beasts, and the mind-bending story is conveyed through the strained frame of family as the duo struggle with their bond.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 18, 2018
4/5 100% Holy Air (2017) A sly satire of consumerism and faith - which in this case has a major overlap - that isn't afraid of melancholic contemplation and complication‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 18, 2018
2/5 51% England Is Mine (2017) he movie bows down to Morrissey's subsequent persona, planting references to future Smiths' lyrics - the Moors Murders, the violent friction of a Manchester street fair - in a way that that makes inspiration soundly uninspiring.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 15, 2018
3.5/5 86% The Revival (2018) [It] doesn't just capture the community dynamics of a southern church and the contradictory pressures, he allows Eli to be seen not as a hypocrite but someone who has genuinely tried to serve their faith and not their heart.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 15, 2018
2.5/5 62% This Beautiful Fantastic (2017) Writer/director Simon Aboud's film turns out much as you would expect it to, saved by the warmth and expertise of a cast - particularly Andrew Scott as a cook who defects from Alfie to Bella - who deserve better material than this pleasing trifle.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 15, 2018
3.5/5 97% Félicité (2017) But alongside the documentary detail and casual inequality - at one point Felicite hires on commission a policeman as her debt collector - there are nocturnal interludes, artful detail.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2018
3/5 86% Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami (2018) While her accent changes to suit the company, Jones is a warmer, wittier person than her breakthrough image of architectural androgyny suggested.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2018
3/5 55% Godard Mon Amour (Le redoutable) (2018) Jean-Luc Godard's films have often overflown with daring conceits - some of them helped change the cinema - but the legendary French filmmaker never imagined this one: a turning point in his life and work would become a droll romantic comedy.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2018
3.5/5 66% Manolo, The Boy Who Made Shoes For Lizards (2017) Eschewing the storied elegance of recent European fashion documentaries, Michael Roberts' film is as joyous and dishy as the now 75-year-old Spaniard who released his first collection in 1971.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 25, 2018
4/5 69% Beuys (2018) "I'm ready to provoke right now," says Joseph Beuys in an archival clip from this sombre, striking documentary, and director Andres Veiel has crafted a film that reflects his capacity to confront and challenge, to liberate and lecture.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 25, 2018
3/5 69% Eric Clapton: A Life in 12 Bars (2017) Has all the usual signifiers of a baby boomer icon, but there's a remoteness at work that is both cold and diminishing. "It took all the pain away," Clapton says of discovering the blues as a child in 1950s England, and negation would become a pattern.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2018
3.5/5 100% The Silences (2016) Nash charts anguish, genealogy and domestic routines (along with her prior works) so that they intertwine into twinned life stories. It's a tender, knowing and evocative work.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2018
4/5 92% Stronger (2017) Gyllenhaal is a galvanising force, with Maslany providing a genuine counterpoint, and when the film does allow emotion to grow, it's with a caveat: being a hero means sacrificing yourself again and again.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2018
3.5/5 98% Jane (2017) The assured storytelling unfolds with acts of both creation and loss, as Goodall and von Lawick raise their infant son in the national park where they work while a polio epidemic ravages the chimpanzee population.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2018
3/5 86% I Am Not Madame Bovary (2016) The film feels equally drawn out despite the bursts of black humour and the emotional depth of Fan's performance.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2018
4/5 76% Manifesto (2017) Cate Blanchett's formidable shape-shifting skills have found their ideal collaborator in German artist and filmmaker Julian Rosefeldt.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2018
3/5 86% Ellipsis (2017) Wenham and his young leads find their own expressive awkwardness and intimacy amid a committed micro-budget aesthetic. In its best scenes, which are often some of the quietest, the camera feels like an equal third participant to what is unfolding.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2018
2/5 8% 7 Guardians of the Tomb (2018) The film lacks dash to the dialogue, excitement to the set-pieces, and enduring creepiness to the malevolent arachnids. Nothing in Guardians of the Tomb has a decent bite.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2018
3.5/5 83% We Don't Need a Map (2017) Warwick Thornton's documentary about the numerous facets of Australian life that have attached themselves to the Southern Cross is a deceptively astute and free-wheeling journey into unknown histories and an unconsidered present.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2018
3/5 88% 1987: When the Day Comes (2017) South Korea's fraught transition from dictatorship to democracy in 1987 is shaped with fictional detail and sometimes excessive melodrama, but as a political thriller Jang Joon-hwan's film has a tense urgency as the resistance slowly turns the tide. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 21, 2018
3/5 84% The Final Year (2018) Director Greg Barker uses his access to offer an insider's perspective, but he rarely questions the decisions or highlights the failings of a superpower's sometimes conflicting policies.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 21, 2018
3.5/5 97% Ethel & Ernest (2016) Falling on the right side of the line that divides the warmth of everyday history from the easy comfort of nostalgia.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 21, 2018
3.5/5 96% Step (2017) Debutante filmmaker Amanda Lipitz has a Broadway background, and it shows in the movie's unabashed predilection for emotion, feel for rhythm and dance, and generous narrative edits.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 6, 2018
3/5 75% Jack and the Cuckoo-Clock Heart (2014) The story is scratchy, and Malzieu's songs don't always translate well, but the visual aesthetic is tactile and sublime.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 6, 2018
4/5 98% Quest (2017) The political lens is unavoidably sharp, but the embedded filmmaker captures moments of strength and support, crises that mark the health of their children, neighbourhood resilience, and the nourishment that hope requires in this working-class community.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2017
3/5 88% Phantom Boy (2016) Their quarry is a villain known only as the Man with the Broken Face, a handle that makes sense once you soak in the Picasso-like renderings of these characters, who exist in a different, hand-drawn realm to Pixar's digital might.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2017
4/5 96% Mudbound (2017) Dee Rees' film is a study of historic division, but it has such a poetically tragic sense of the characters and their limitations that it transcends the period setting.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Dec 28, 2017