Craig Mathieson Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Craig Mathieson

Craig Mathieson
Craig Mathieson's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Age (Australia), sbs.com.au, The Sunday Age

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3/5 68% mother! (2017) Buoyed by an emotionally acute lead performance by Jennifer Lawrence as the uneasy half in a couple, the film has no end of palpable elements: caustic social comedy, oozy household horror and brazen satire all rub uncomfortably up against each other.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
3.5/5 No Score Yet Namatjira Project (2017) The weight of its many strands eventually tie together the past and the present, artistic greatness and commercial reality, and Indigenous life with the judgment of white Australia.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
3/5 82% That's Not Me (2017) The film profits from both the cosmic cruelty of someone physically the same being perceived so differently and the lead's note-perfect facial expressions of disbelief.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
2.5/5 72% Gifted (2017) The performances are better than the material, with Evans movie-star stoic while Octavia Spencer makes the most of an underwritten role as Frank's landlord and Mary's devoted karaoke pal.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Sep 6, 2017
2.5/5 53% 47 Meters Down (2017) British director Johannes Roberts, with good work from cinematographer Mark Silk, allows the undersea action to unfold like a procedural, so that the details ratchet up the tension. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Sep 6, 2017
3/5 89% Girls Trip (2017) It's able to balance genuine insight with comic punctuation and shameless resolution; they get high and heartfelt.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Sep 6, 2017
4/5 98% God's Own Country (2017) Sexuality is not a means of escape, but a way of making sense of these demanding lives for both the characters and the audience. The dialogue is sparse but illuminating, while the storytelling leaves you powerfully involved.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Sep 6, 2017
2.5/5 38% The Hitman's Bodyguard (2017) But you can't overstate how many familiar elements are awkwardly plugged together here, from fight scene flourishes to obvious punchlines.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Sep 6, 2017
2.5/5 No Score Yet All for One (2017) It bulges with Aussie camaraderie and conflicting personalities whose disagreements are mentioned but never examined.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Aug 27, 2017
2.5/5 16% The Dark Tower (2017) It's yet another clunky movie where the effortlessly charismatic Elba has to make do with cliches. The former star of The Wire must despair of finding a genuinely great film role.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Aug 27, 2017
4/5 88% American Made (2017) The role makes Cruise's obsessive energy both believable and pleasurable‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Aug 27, 2017
2.5/5 78% Killing Ground (2017) The terror for the audience is blunt and bludgeoning, but conversely Power is an accomplished stylist who adroitly keeps the camera on the edge of increasingly bad expectations.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Aug 22, 2017
3.5/5 93% Logan Lucky (2017) The movie almost has enough assured touches and aromatic performances to make you overlook that the humour is generic at times and that the story suffers from not having a genuine antagonist to shake things up.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Aug 22, 2017
3/5 82% The King's Choice (2017) While the plotting can be sluggish, the best quality of The King's Choice is how it reveals the sudden, dislocating impact of war.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Aug 22, 2017
3/5 86% Wind River (2017) The vista is widescreen and so is the deprivation: boarded-up trailers that are barely habitable and bodies laid out in the snow, surrendered to the elements, feature prominently.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
2.5/5 68% The Wall (2017) The concise length partially mitigates the failings, but ultimately this is a Saw knock-off in camo gear.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
1.5/5 22% The Time of Their Lives (2017) The cast are not so much game as professional - all three understand what must be done in the service of a paltry story. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
3.5/5 98% The Big Sick (2017) Both the script and the direction, from Michael Showalter, move with such pleasing assurance, held aloft by warm currents of banter backstage and at the dinner table, that you don't notice the deceptions that Kumail practises in the name of deference.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2017
2/5 50% Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (2017) The French filmmaker's vast space opera is frustratingly contrary: it's diversionary instead of dynamic, convoluted instead of creative, and waspish instead of witty.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2017
4/5 93% War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) Seeing Caesar bound to a cross, or watching apes enslaved to work and die when they yearn for their own promised land, you could easily surmise that Reeves has pulled off a genre that Hollywood hasn't come close to mastering in decades: the biblical epic.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Aug 3, 2017
3.5/5 92% A Ghost Story (2017) The living and the dead share a space but little else, and Mara captures the flickering needle of grieving. The effect is not pretentious but more often sadly sweet; the separation makes their longing swell.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Aug 3, 2017
3/5 93% Baby Driver (2017) America gives Wright his boss tunes, his cinematic influences and a ticket to ride. There's also the risk of hubris attached to that freedom, as becomes apparent here.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jul 20, 2017
2.5/5 No Score Yet Descent Into The Maelstrom (2017) Descent Into the Maelstrom ticks off each needle flicker on the timeline, but it almost never seizes on a crucial moment or pushes its subjects, a collection of greyed baby boomers, to explain themselves.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jul 20, 2017
3.5/5 92% Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017) Headlined by a winning performance from Tom Holland as a teenager enduring a truly demanding puberty, Spider-Man: Homecoming downscales the superhero movie. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jul 11, 2017
4/5 92% First Girl I Loved (2016) The film's title is love-struck, but this is a deceptively wrenching story of self-discovery and honesty.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jul 11, 2017
3/5 17% The House (2017) This is a more complex construction than some of Ferrell's recent comedies - it is bleak about the pliability of local communities, complete with corrupt officialdom - but it lacks a motivating back and forth between Ferrell and Poehler.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jul 11, 2017
4/4 92% First Girl I Loved (2016) The film's title is love-struck, but this is a deceptively wrenching story of self-discovery and honesty.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2017
4/5 89% It Comes At Night (2017) That's part of the power conveyed by the sparse storytelling - it keeps bringing connections and realisations to the surface. Little is said, but much becomes apparent.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2017
2/5 20% Diary Of A Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul (2017) There's a slight commentary on suburban versus rural America, but returning English director David Bowers favours icky mayhem and genial rapprochement‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2017
2/5 15% Transformers: The Last Knight (2017) It's a case of apocalypse very soon, with a checklist of borrowed elements that ranges from the boys in Netflix's Stranger Things to the BB-8 droid from Star Wars: The Force Awakens.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 30, 2017
3/5 64% Detour (2017) The satisfaction in Detour ultimately comes not from the drama drawn from these conflicting personalities, but a finale that knits together the plots. None of the twists are truly surprising, but they're engineered with solid craftsmanship. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 30, 2017
4/5 94% Citizen Jane: Battle for the City (2017) A bracing, insightful study of how cities are made and sometimes destroyed.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 30, 2017
2.5/5 84% The Villainess (Ak-Nyeo) (2017) The story borrows liberally from Luc Besson's La Femme Nikita, although the middle segments, once Sook-hee is rehabilitated and working as a sleeper agent, are both convoluted and undercut by obvious sentiment.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 30, 2017
2/5 18% All Eyez on Me (2017) The film displays little sense of rhythm to its technique and no insight in its storytelling aside from burnishing Tupac's complex legacy.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 30, 2017
4/5 83% Una (2017) What Mara and Mendelsohn share as actors is an intensity that can warp a scene's direction as if amending the emotional gravity between their characters. It happens repeatedly here.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
3/5 81% Risk (2017) Poitras, with a suitably furtive technique that amplifies both the paranoia and the pettiness, struggles to define Assange.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
2.5/5 87% Whitney: Can I Be Me (2017) The film works best as a study of celebrity self-delusion, with the singer glossing over reality in each media appearance, but Broomfield is not above milking emotion from the very people the documentary condemns for enabling Houston's destruction.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
3.5/5 No Score Yet Nahid (2015) Freedom is a tempting illusion, almost within reach so as to tempt and entrap, for the heroine in this engrossing Iranian domestic drama.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
3.5/5 75% My Cousin Rachel (2017) Corseted courtesies and the candlelit rooms with their flickering pools of light never overwhelm the story's contemporary resonance. The clash of male assumption and jealousy, and female wiles and independence, has no shortage of present-day parallels.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2017
2.5/5 16% The Mummy (2017) The new Mummy is a woman, Princess Ahmanet (Sofia Boutella), whose lust to rule got her cursed and interred. Set free, she sucks the life from others and creates zombie servants. I'm not exactly sure you can chalk that up as a win for gender equality‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2017
3/5 98% Kedi (2017) Defined by low to the ground camerawork that captures feline grace and a ruminative philosophical outlook, this Turkish documentary about the city of Istanbul's vast population of moggies overshadows any mere cat video online. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2017
3.5/5 93% Hotel Coolgardie (2016) Gleeson's unvarnished style actually leans towards signs of friendship and understanding, but there are several scenes that are nightmarish.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2017
4/5 95% Graduation (Bacalaureat) (2017) Without provocation, the tension is gripping and Mungiu's gaze unstinting.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
3/5 48% Wilson (2017) The idea of the prickly misanthrope who tries to waywardly make good is starting to become an archetype in the cinema, but Woody Harrelson delivers on just enough of the presumptuous and gently pessimistic lines to pull it off.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
3/5 92% Wonder Woman (2017) Gadot's Princess Diana is the full nascent-superhero package: youthful idealism, a body so perfect you'd swear it was a special effect, and some mystical backstory for a third-act revelation.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
4/5 89% Hounds of Love (2017) A horror film hiding behind the blank facade of house in Perth's suburbs, Hounds of Love is a nightmarishly tense study of the power that the corrupted both demand and receive. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2017
2.5/5 29% Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017) The temporary alliances and perpetually battered maps are repetitive, while Depp's signature discombobulated banter, all haphazard and huffy, is mostly played out. What was amusing on first encounter in 2003 is now verging on the boilerplate.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2017
4/5 96% After the Storm (Umi yori mo mada fukaku) (2017) The film's realism is demurely genuine, and it slowly reveals the strange understanding that permeates families.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2017
2.5/5 28% King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword (2017) Guy Ritchie is too inventive a filmmaker to deliver a dull take on Arthurian legend, but the six different movies he has tried to squeeze into a single session make for a messy and sometimes maddening experience.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2017
2.5/5 90% John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) Reeves' grim perseverance sometimes feels like it's in a different film to the vivid brightness splashed around him.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 21, 2017