Craig Mathieson Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Craig Mathieson

Craig Mathieson
Craig Mathieson's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Age (Australia), sbs.com.au, The Sunday Age

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3/5 67% Free Fire (2017) An action-comedy played out at half speed, with a cheerfully black sense of humour that nicks and wounds like the bullets intermittently ricocheting after an illicit deal goes south.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
4/5 92% Certain Women (2016) These stories takes shape against the backdrop of everyday tasks and ritual-like chores; these women can't transcend the lives that they have committed to, but just a hint of recognition can unleash a sense of the unexpected and profound.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
2.5/5 22% Table 19 (2017) A Hollywood romantic comedy that wades deep into sentimentality when it repeatedly appears better off exploring the abrasive and the unexpected.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
2.5/5 45% Going in Style (2017) The retirees condemn international outsourcing of jobs and Wall Street greed and then hatch a sweet get-even scheme. Their real-life equivalents voted for Donald Trump.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
4/5 91% Raw (2017) Marillier, quivering with fearfulness and then flush with rapt pleasure when she indulges, never merely becomes a ravenous cannibal. Her startled humanity burns through.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 18, 2017
3/5 66% The Fate of the Furious (2017) So why is The Fate of the Furious an amusing step up on recent editions? Its ludicrousness has an amiability this time around that's more enjoyable than the mawkishness that dogged 2015's Fast & Furious 7.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 18, 2017
3/5 80% Berlin Syndrome (2017) As a mystery based on intent and escalating risk, the movie lacks momentum, but as an exploration of character it digs into both Clare's responses to her imprisonment and Andi's motivation‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 18, 2017
4.5/5 80% Personal Shopper (2017) Defined by scenes that occur between two fixed points: a train travelling between Paris and London, the divide between belief and fear, the commercial interactions of a celebrity and a fashion house.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
3/5 83% Denial (2016) Spall suggests a rotting, vainglorious ego while Weisz displays a brassy immediacy, easily contrasted with her British lawyers, but none of the characters have an inner life and the movie defers to an American respect for British tradition.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
3.5/5 100% Ingrid Bergman in Her Own Words (Jag är Ingrid) (2015) Those reels are one of the many elements, along with the testimony of her children, several professional collaborators, and extensive archival footage that form this intimate and enlightening documentary‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
2.5/5 45% Ghost in the Shell (2017) Sanders makes wow moments out of entrances, as when Major crashes a restaurant massacre-cum-brain hack with guns blazing. But he's not particularly good at building action sequences so that they have a logical flow or emotional grip. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 7, 2017
3/5 90% Irreplaceable (Médecin de campagne) (2016) Lilti has a knack for holding on community members and the briefly seen so that their faces and concerns register, while being economical with the sentimentality. His film takes its tone from Jean-Pierre: caring but on the clock.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 7, 2017
2.5/5 53% The Boss Baby (2017) There's an offbeat tone to the movie - personified by a gorgeously assembled pastel fantasia sequence set in a baby-making factory versus a family having their memories of a child erased - that verges on the disquieting.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 7, 2017
4 100% Clash (Eshtebak) (2016) Manages to convey - with ferocious clamour and fearful failing - the physical reality of power changing hands.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 7, 2017
2.5/5 71% Beauty and the Beast (2017) The love in this Beauty and the Beast resides in the audience's affection for the 1991 soundtrack, which stars with nostalgic durability. For a film about finding freedom through devotion to an unlikely other, this has all the passion of a straitjacket.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
3/5 91% A Man Called Ove (En man som heter Ove) (2016) Best seen as a paean to community and a reproach to xenophobic culture, A Man Called Ove manages to put a successful Scandinavian spin on the feel good comic-drama where a curmudgeon gets a second chance at enjoying life.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
2.5/5 41% A Cure For Wellness (2017) No menacing corridor goes unexplored and no mood is left unteased in this glossily atmospheric thriller where the 1 per cent have their own issues to worry about.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
3.5/5 100% Zach's Ceremony (2016) The film shows the public and personal pressures confronting Zach, from the historic white dispossession to everyday racism in the schoolyard ... it captures a difficult father and son dynamic that can swing from inspiration to disappointment.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
2/5 No Score Yet Rough Stuff (2017) Adams shows some good technique without the vehicles, but even using what appears to be remote-controlled models, the car chases and vertical ascents become repetitive. Brevity should be a virtue for Rough Stuff, yet it runs for two hours.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2017
2/5 17% A Few Less Men (2016) New director Mark Lamprell (Goddess) does a decent job stringing out obvious jokes and keeping the cast in comic motion, but the film is episodic and increasingly predictable.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2017
3/5 92% The Eagle Huntress (2016) Otto Bell's debut feature documentary could do, despite the narration of Daisy Ridley, with some more explanation. But while Aisholpan and Rys aren't the most giving of interview subjects, the world they inhabit is ripe for visual appreciation‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2017
3.5/5 50% The Death and Life of Otto Bloom (2016) Cris Jones' debut feature is that rare thing: a mock documentary that reaches a genuine emotional depth.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2017
3/5 77% Kong: Skull Island (2017) It has a barbed sense of humour, a thankful disbelief in military might and a sense of scale that comes with a mocking physicality. Swallowed whole or swatted like flies, human beings are insignificant distractions in this lost world.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 14, 2017
4/5 92% Logan (2017) Full of grainy light and bloody violence that is shadowed by sorrowful regret, James Mangold's movie creates a sober and deeply satisfying finale for Hugh Jackman's Wolverine, the snarling centrepiece of so many X-Men movies.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2017
3/5 71% Miss Sloane (2016) Armed with rhetorical questions that ricochet and a take-no-prisoners attitude, Chastain's Elizabeth Sloane is a mass of sharp, compelling angles. Anyone who needs their protagonist to be likeable shouldn't bother with the film.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2017
4/5 97% Aquarius (2016) While the drumbeat of gentrification is obvious, the film moves to the particular pace of Clara's life, catching the rhythm of her daily routine and the minor moments of pleasure - the sea's embrace, flirtation, the sound of music - that she basks in.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2017
3.5/5 84% Violette (2014) The relationship between two historic literary figures has rarely been so fiercely drawn as it is in Martin Provost's French drama.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2017
3/5 78% T2 Trainspotting (2017) There are nods to how contemporary Scotland has changed, but Boyle's desire to intertwine then and now mostly puts commentary aside for a remix project that uses Trainspotting as a series of parts to be sampled for the sequel. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 25, 2017
4/5 100% The Family (2016) First seen when police raided homes in 1987, The Family's communal children, some adopted illegally, recount as adults the beatings, starvation, and forced LSD sessions they endured; one victim describes their compound as "a concentration camp".‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 25, 2017
4/5 99% Cameraperson (2016) Cameraperson shows how the act of being filmed is a negotiation, and even without the initial context the emotional crux of certain sequences is wrenching.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 25, 2017
4/5 97% The Love Witch (2016) A stylised invocation of camp 1960s Technicolor melodrama and 1970s Italian horror recast for an alternate history where the occult and gender roles overlap into feminist critique.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 24, 2017
3.5/5 93% Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World (2016) In a way this a companion piece to 2010's Cave of Forgotten Dreams, with an awe attached to the idea of creation that mostly precludes discussing topics such as hacking, fake news and cyberwar.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 24, 2017
2.5/5 35% The Great Wall (2017) Zhang is more interested in ceremonies than combat sequences. Ranks of soldiers in exotic uniforms march into position atop battlements, while both feast and funeral are played out as spectacles.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 24, 2017
4/5 85% Silence (2017) A richly detailed study of faith as a force of spiritual respite and of despair, one that feels deeply connected to both the holy men and unholy gangsters that dot Scorsese's dialogue with the damned.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2017
2/5 9% Fifty Shades Darker (2017) You have to get past the obvious dialogue, the repetitive plot, the less than scintillating sexual encounters, the wasted supporting cast, the Ben Wa balls and the scene where a shirtless hunk works out to a terrible Police song.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2017
3.5/5 60% Goodnight Brooklyn: The Story of Death by Audio (2016) Matt Conboy's documentary captures both the unstoppable change and strange conflagration of the final weeks where construction work happens each day with a farewell gig each night.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2017
3.5/5 88% The Coming War On China (2016) A barbed interview with a US diplomat is prime Pilger, but his eye for imagery amid the apocalyptic foreshadowing is equally strong - walking through an abandoned US nuclear test bunker he invokes "a subterranean temple to modern times". ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2017
3/5 83% The King (2017) The sound and fury negates subtlety or cause, but this whirlwind drama is a telling primer on South Korean white collar rituals.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2017
3/5 93% Fences (2016) One of the pleasures of Fences is seeing Washington's dominant technique - that swaggering walk, the hardening of his voice when challenged - get batted back by the visceral force of Davis' performance.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2017
4/5 92% Toni Erdmann (2016) Stripped of a steadying score and explanatory monologues - so much is left unsaid in Toni Erdmann that the absence starts to say something - this story of a father and daughter's bond can be a litmus test for your sense of humour.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2017
3.5/5 No Score Yet Winter at Westbeth (2017) Spong captures the lust for life in his subjects and, particularly in the case of Williams, their heartfelt memories, while celebrating the Westbeth as a triumph of public housing and community infrastructure. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2017
4/5 96% Manchester by the Sea (2016) A powerful and sometimes unexpectedly humorous drama about a man who refuses to acknowledge his past even as the present insists on it. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 31, 2017
3.5/5 87% The People vs. Fritz Bauer (Der Staat Gegen Fritz Bauer) (2016) Somewhat conservative in its production crafts but alive with moral risk and ideological duplicity‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 31, 2017
2.5/5 50% Kung-Fu Yoga (2017) The slapstick fight scenes and action set-pieces - particularly a car chase in Dubai punctuated by a languid lion's presence - elevate the film somewhat, but Kung Fu Yoga's broadness is not so much engaging as merely ticking the many boxes.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 31, 2017
2.5/5 43% xXx: Return of Xander Cage (2017) While director DJ Caruso (Eagle Eye) can tidy the action sequences he can't do a great deal with his leading man, whose woodenness here extends to heady philosophising and seductive encouragement.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 31, 2017
5/5 98% Moonlight (2016) There's possibility in every moment, as you see when Chiron reconnects with the grown Kevin (Andre Holland), and those moments keep accumulating until Moonlight is an unforgettable vision of love and acceptance.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2017
3/5 75% Split (2017) Taylor-Joy has a sense of self-possession so fierce it's frightening, and ... her performance here does a great deal to pull Split above its sometimes queasy use of unspeakable trauma as a plot point.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2017
2.5/5 31% Railroad Tigers (2017) Chan is economical instead of eruptive, gracefully setting up gags and often sidestepping the frenetic movements of his co-stars (who include his son Jaycee). ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2017
3/5 No Score Yet Le Ride (2016) Keoghan's motivation is divided between fascination with the original riders, who were not expected to last, and his own belief in pushing himself, but the film is less a historical study than a travelogue for cycling devotees.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2017
2.5/5 84% The Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble (2016) At the centre of it Ma is a studied, unrevealed figure, while the rehearsals and jam sessions create a joyous glow of affirmation that overwhelms a deeper sense of inquiry; the longer the film goes on, the less it has to say.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2017