Craig Mathieson Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Craig Mathieson

Craig Mathieson
Craig Mathieson's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Age (Australia), sbs.com.au, The Sunday Age

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
4/5 90% Una (2016) What Mara and Mendelsohn share as actors is an intensity that can warp a scene's direction as if amending the emotional gravity between their characters. It happens repeatedly here.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
3/5 85% Risk (2017) Poitras, with a suitably furtive technique that amplifies both the paranoia and the pettiness, struggles to define Assange.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
2.5/5 88% Whitney: Can I Be Me (2017) The film works best as a study of celebrity self-delusion, with the singer glossing over reality in each media appearance, but Broomfield is not above milking emotion from the very people the documentary condemns for enabling Houston's destruction.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
3.5/5 No Score Yet Nahid (2015) Freedom is a tempting illusion, almost within reach so as to tempt and entrap, for the heroine in this engrossing Iranian domestic drama.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
3.5/5 75% My Cousin Rachel (2017) Corseted courtesies and the candlelit rooms with their flickering pools of light never overwhelm the story's contemporary resonance. The clash of male assumption and jealousy, and female wiles and independence, has no shortage of present-day parallels.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2017
2.5/5 15% The Mummy (2017) The new Mummy is a woman, Princess Ahmanet (Sofia Boutella), whose lust to rule got her cursed and interred. Set free, she sucks the life from others and creates zombie servants. I'm not exactly sure you can chalk that up as a win for gender equality‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2017
3/5 97% Kedi (2017) Defined by low to the ground camerawork that captures feline grace and a ruminative philosophical outlook, this Turkish documentary about the city of Istanbul's vast population of moggies overshadows any mere cat video online. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2017
3.5/5 92% Hotel Coolgardie (2016) Gleeson's unvarnished style actually leans towards signs of friendship and understanding, but there are several scenes that are nightmarish.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2017
4/5 97% Graduation (Bacalaureat) (2017) Without provocation, the tension is gripping and Mungiu's gaze unstinting.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
3/5 46% Wilson (2017) The idea of the prickly misanthrope who tries to waywardly make good is starting to become an archetype in the cinema, but Woody Harrelson delivers on just enough of the presumptuous and gently pessimistic lines to pull it off.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
3/5 92% Wonder Woman (2017) Gadot's Princess Diana is the full nascent-superhero package: youthful idealism, a body so perfect you'd swear it was a special effect, and some mystical backstory for a third-act revelation.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
4/5 92% Hounds of Love (2017) A horror film hiding behind the blank facade of house in Perth's suburbs, Hounds of Love is a nightmarishly tense study of the power that the corrupted both demand and receive. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2017
2.5/5 29% Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017) The temporary alliances and perpetually battered maps are repetitive, while Depp's signature discombobulated banter, all haphazard and huffy, is mostly played out. What was amusing on first encounter in 2003 is now verging on the boilerplate.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2017
4/5 96% After the Storm (Umi yori mo mada fukaku) (2017) The film's realism is demurely genuine, and it slowly reveals the strange understanding that permeates families.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2017
2.5/5 28% King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword (2017) Guy Ritchie is too inventive a filmmaker to deliver a dull take on Arthurian legend, but the six different movies he has tried to squeeze into a single session make for a messy and sometimes maddening experience.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2017
2.5/5 89% John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) Reeves' grim perseverance sometimes feels like it's in a different film to the vivid brightness splashed around him.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 21, 2017
2.5/5 81% Handsome Devil (2017) A sweet if slight movie about the trials of teenage conformity‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 21, 2017
2/5 35% Snatched (2017) The first sign that Amy Schumer's screen persona - boisterously deceptive, comically revelatory - can be smoothed down into a crudely affable Hollywood outline, Snatched is an all too familiar comic misadventure‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 21, 2017
2/5 30% A Dog's Purpose (2017) The movie somehow manages to be both trite and macabre.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 21, 2017
4/5 94% Fire at Sea (Fuocoammare) (2016) The ongoing crisis is mediated by technology, but those involved have the simplest of rituals and hopes, and the film's observational focus - stripped of narration and a score - builds into a compelling experience.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 21, 2017
3/5 78% Don't Tell (2017) Left despairingly silent by disbelief, guilt, and denial, Tori Garrett's film effectively tells the tale of the individual struggling to be heard in the face of an uncaring institution.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 21, 2017
2.5/5 67% The Osiris Child: Science Fiction Volume One (2016) The movie, with its uniform American accents for the international market, is constantly torn between the generic and the original. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 21, 2017
4/5 88% The Childhood of a Leader (2016) Sudden lens strobe and Scott Walker's sawing score connect the character to the tumult of 20th century Europe, suggesting the child is its destructive heir, and the film climaxes with a remarkable final sequence‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 9, 2017
2.5/5 75% EMO the Musical (2016) The plotting gets somewhat repetitive and a touch of choreography to fill the frame may have helped.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 9, 2017
2/5 60% The Zookeeper's Wife (2017) There is a point in filmmaking where the tasteful can become timid, and unfortunately this handsome period drama turns that corner halfway through its generous running time.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 9, 2017
3/5 81% Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) The best moments of Gunn's follow-up to his 2014 hit have an unfettered filmmaking joy - a knowing, kinetic pleasure that comes with a wink and some adolescent wish fulfilment.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 2, 2017
3.5/5 94% The Innocents (Les innocentes) (2016) Shot through with winter tones and a solemn contemplation that evokes religious art, The Innocents evokes the struggle for spiritual survival. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 2, 2017
3/5 60% Bad Girl (2016) Like Amy's gleaming new home, which is transformed from a sanctuary into a trap, the film twists perceptions of adolescent camaraderie, attraction, and family's grip, with just enough shocks to allay the familiar conclusion.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted May 2, 2017
3/5 67% Free Fire (2017) An action-comedy played out at half speed, with a cheerfully black sense of humour that nicks and wounds like the bullets intermittently ricocheting after an illicit deal goes south.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
4/5 92% Certain Women (2016) These stories takes shape against the backdrop of everyday tasks and ritual-like chores; these women can't transcend the lives that they have committed to, but just a hint of recognition can unleash a sense of the unexpected and profound.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
2.5/5 23% Table 19 (2017) A Hollywood romantic comedy that wades deep into sentimentality when it repeatedly appears better off exploring the abrasive and the unexpected.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
2.5/5 46% Going in Style (2017) The retirees condemn international outsourcing of jobs and Wall Street greed and then hatch a sweet get-even scheme. Their real-life equivalents voted for Donald Trump.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
4/5 90% Raw (2017) Marillier, quivering with fearfulness and then flush with rapt pleasure when she indulges, never merely becomes a ravenous cannibal. Her startled humanity burns through.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 18, 2017
3/5 66% The Fate of the Furious (2017) So why is The Fate of the Furious an amusing step up on recent editions? Its ludicrousness has an amiability this time around that's more enjoyable than the mawkishness that dogged 2015's Fast & Furious 7.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 18, 2017
3/5 75% Berlin Syndrome (2017) As a mystery based on intent and escalating risk, the movie lacks momentum, but as an exploration of character it digs into both Clare's responses to her imprisonment and Andi's motivation‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 18, 2017
4.5/5 79% Personal Shopper (2017) Defined by scenes that occur between two fixed points: a train travelling between Paris and London, the divide between belief and fear, the commercial interactions of a celebrity and a fashion house.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
3/5 83% Denial (2016) Spall suggests a rotting, vainglorious ego while Weisz displays a brassy immediacy, easily contrasted with her British lawyers, but none of the characters have an inner life and the movie defers to an American respect for British tradition.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
3.5/5 100% Ingrid Bergman in Her Own Words (Jag är Ingrid) (2015) Those reels are one of the many elements, along with the testimony of her children, several professional collaborators, and extensive archival footage that form this intimate and enlightening documentary‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
2.5/5 45% Ghost in the Shell (2017) Sanders makes wow moments out of entrances, as when Major crashes a restaurant massacre-cum-brain hack with guns blazing. But he's not particularly good at building action sequences so that they have a logical flow or emotional grip. ‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 7, 2017
3/5 90% Irreplaceable (Médecin de campagne) (2016) Lilti has a knack for holding on community members and the briefly seen so that their faces and concerns register, while being economical with the sentimentality. His film takes its tone from Jean-Pierre: caring but on the clock.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 7, 2017
2.5/5 52% The Boss Baby (2017) There's an offbeat tone to the movie - personified by a gorgeously assembled pastel fantasia sequence set in a baby-making factory versus a family having their memories of a child erased - that verges on the disquieting.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 7, 2017
4 97% Clash (Eshtebak) (2016) Manages to convey - with ferocious clamour and fearful failing - the physical reality of power changing hands.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Apr 7, 2017
2.5/5 71% Beauty and the Beast (2017) The love in this Beauty and the Beast resides in the audience's affection for the 1991 soundtrack, which stars with nostalgic durability. For a film about finding freedom through devotion to an unlikely other, this has all the passion of a straitjacket.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
3/5 90% A Man Called Ove (En man som heter Ove) (2016) Best seen as a paean to community and a reproach to xenophobic culture, A Man Called Ove manages to put a successful Scandinavian spin on the feel good comic-drama where a curmudgeon gets a second chance at enjoying life.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
2.5/5 42% A Cure For Wellness (2017) No menacing corridor goes unexplored and no mood is left unteased in this glossily atmospheric thriller where the 1 per cent have their own issues to worry about.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
3.5/5 100% Zach's Ceremony (2016) The film shows the public and personal pressures confronting Zach, from the historic white dispossession to everyday racism in the schoolyard ... it captures a difficult father and son dynamic that can swing from inspiration to disappointment.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
2/5 No Score Yet Rough Stuff (2017) Adams shows some good technique without the vehicles, but even using what appears to be remote-controlled models, the car chases and vertical ascents become repetitive. Brevity should be a virtue for Rough Stuff, yet it runs for two hours.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2017
2/5 17% A Few Less Men (2016) New director Mark Lamprell (Goddess) does a decent job stringing out obvious jokes and keeping the cast in comic motion, but the film is episodic and increasingly predictable.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2017
3/5 92% The Eagle Huntress (2016) Otto Bell's debut feature documentary could do, despite the narration of Daisy Ridley, with some more explanation. But while Aisholpan and Rys aren't the most giving of interview subjects, the world they inhabit is ripe for visual appreciation‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2017
3.5/5 50% The Death and Life of Otto Bloom (2016) Cris Jones' debut feature is that rare thing: a mock documentary that reaches a genuine emotional depth.‐ The Sunday Age
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2017