David Armstrong Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

David Armstrong

David Armstrong
David Armstrong's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): San Francisco Examiner

Movie Reviews Only

Showing 1 - 11 of 11
Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
52%

Two Girls and a Guy (1998)

"The year's smartest and spikiest date-movie so far." San Francisco Examiner
Posted Jan 1, 2000
4/4 98%

When We Were Kings (1996)

"Ali didn't fumble often, and neither do Gast and Hackford. This is a love-match of filmmakers and subject. Together, they go the distance." San Francisco Examiner
Posted Jan 1, 2000
90%

October Sky (1999)

"A compulsively watchable, well-crafted feature..." San Francisco Examiner
Posted Jan 1, 2000
50%

Higher Learning (1994)

"Energetic, uneven but engaging." San Francisco Examiner
Posted Jan 1, 2000
6%

Kazaam (1996)

"The movie is decidedly old-fashioned, aiming to send kids and their parents out of the theater feeling good about themselves." San Francisco Examiner
Posted Jan 1, 2000
71%

Wilde (1998)

"Wilde is, laudably, not presented as a simple icon or martyr of the gay movement, but as a flawed, admirable, attractive, disappointing human being." San Francisco Examiner
Posted Jan 1, 2000
3/4 100%

4 Little Girls (1997)

"The movie is strongest when Lee keeps his eye on the prize: the experiences of ordinary people in an extraordinary time." San Francisco Examiner
Posted Jan 1, 2000
70%

Frequency (2000)

"Quaid and Caviezel establish a firm emotional connection in moments that are by turns funny, affecting and eerie." San Francisco Examiner
Posted Jan 1, 2000
94%

Once Were Warriors (1994)

"It is an impressive first feature for its director, Lee Tamahori, and a splendid dramatic vehicle for its stars, especially Rena Owen." San Francisco Examiner
Posted Jan 1, 2000
51%

In the Mouth of Madness (1995)

"The names are big, but the payoff is small." San Francisco Examiner
Posted Jan 1, 2000
63%

Clay Pigeons (1998)

"You can do a lot with black comedy: show dead bodies, show naked bodies, juxtapose irony and fear, strike cultural poses, tell jokes -- and you don't need a big budget. You just need attitude. And, hopefully, skill." San Francisco Examiner
Posted Jan 1, 2000
Showing 1 - 11 of 11