David DenbyMovie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

David Denby

David Denby
David Denby's reviews (from any publication) always count toward the Tomatometer because this critic is a Tomatometer-approved critic.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
91% Blue Jasmine (2013) In all, this is the strongest, most resonant movie Woody Allen has made in years. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Jul 24, 2013
55% Man of Steel (2013) The movie consists of endless declamation, endless violence. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Jul 1, 2013
49% Now You See Me (2013) Complicated nonsense about four professional magicians caught up in an elaborate revenge plot.‐ New Yorker
Posted Jul 1, 2013
67% World War Z (2013) Despite some conventional passages and a soft ending, Forster and Brad Pitt, who is a producer of the film as well as its star, pulled the picture together. They also managed to reawaken in a large-scale movie the experience of shock. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Jun 21, 2013
48% The Great Gatsby (2013) Fitzgerald's illusions were not very different from Gatsby's, but his illusionless book resists destruction even from the most aggressive and powerful despoilers. ‐ New Yorker
Posted May 6, 2013
98% Mud (2013) Nichols has a strong feeling for the tactility of natural elements-water, wood, terrain, weather.‐ New Yorker
Posted May 6, 2013
80% Breaking the Sound Barrier (The Sound Barrier) (1952) The aerodynamic issues in the movie may now be antiquated, but the excitement and beauty of early jet aviation are still irresistible. ‐ New Yorker
Posted May 1, 2013
36% Inside Daisy Clover (1966) Wood's movements are spasmodic and graceless. The director Robert Mulligan can't quite find the rhythm, either. Some of the picture is whimsical, some of it as lugubrious as a horror movie.‐ New Yorker
Posted May 1, 2013
41% Midnight's Children (2013) Rushdie's characteristic antic humor animates the family scenes, but the movie gets bogged down in endless plot convolutions and whimsy (the material would have worked better as a TV miniseries).‐ New Yorker
Posted Apr 29, 2013
87% What Maisie Knew (2013) There is much anger, betrayal, and cruelty as the girl's watchful eyes take in everything and she learns, slowly, what she must do to survive.‐ New Yorker
Posted Apr 29, 2013
72% Elephant (2003) Gus Van Sant's fascinating, mysterious, semidocumentary meditation on the Columbine massacre is not very satisfying, but it's still something to see.‐ New Yorker
Posted Apr 24, 2013
79% Fight Club (1999) We're meant to take the male bonding and the blood rituals as a protest against the sterility of corporate life and modern design, but Fincher's sadomasochistic kicks overwhelm any possible social critique.‐ New Yorker
Posted Apr 22, 2013
79% 42 (2013) A square, uninventive, but detailed and stirring bio-pic devoted to the two years in an athlete's life that changed a nation.‐ New Yorker
Posted Apr 22, 2013
87% A History of Violence (2005) Cronenberg's direction, mirroring the split in Tom, is alternately measured and frighteningly explosive, and, as always, he gives the movie a nasty underlay of sexual perversity.‐ New Yorker
Posted Apr 15, 2013
81% X-Men (2000) The most beautiful, strange, and exciting comic-book movie since the original Batman.‐ New Yorker
Posted Apr 15, 2013
46% To The Wonder (2013) The individually ravishing but loosely bound shots reduce whatever weight the story might have to the trivial narcissism of Caribbean-travel commercials.‐ New Yorker
Posted Apr 15, 2013
54% The Company You Keep (2013) This film, with its prickly characters and complicated plot, rips along with continuous tension and power.‐ New Yorker
Posted Apr 15, 2013
81% Road to Perdition (2002) Visually, the picture is all of a piece, but it's a self-conscious piece of work -- all dark-toned academic classicism.‐ New Yorker
Posted Apr 14, 2013
92% Ghost World (2001) See it for Birch's hostile stare and Johansson's devastating monotone.‐ New Yorker
Posted Apr 12, 2013
70% Renoir (2013) The director Gilles Bourdos's sunshiny Portrait of the Artist as an Old Man.‐ New Yorker
Posted Apr 8, 2013
80% The Place Beyond The Pines (2013) The movie, which holds your attention from moment to moment, by the end leaves you grasping for the experience you haven't had. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Mar 28, 2013
48% Olympus Has Fallen (2013) Fuqua doesn't deliver on what he has set up. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Mar 28, 2013
94% Paths of Glory (1957) The sardonic rhetoric may be laid on a little heavily at times, but the movie is blunt and scornfully brilliant. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Mar 26, 2013
92% Sugar (2008) This is a tragic sports movie that shies away from every element of tragedy.‐ New Yorker
Posted Mar 20, 2013
97% Pickpocket (1959) Bresson choreographs the complex techniques of lifting wallets and watches with such precision that one seems to be watching a kind of surreptitious ballet. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Mar 5, 2013
100% Un condamné à mort s'est échappé ou Le vent souffle où il veut (A Man Escaped) (1957) The prisoner's lonely ardor is enhanced by Mozart's Mass in C Minor; the ending of the movie, as the music wells up, is pure elation. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Mar 5, 2013
82% Street of Shame (1956) Of all the films about prostitution, Kenji Mizoguchi's Street of Shame, made in 1956 at the end of his career, is perhaps the greatest. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Mar 4, 2013
92% Shakespeare in Love (1998) A ripely emotional comedy-fantasia.‐ New Yorker
Posted Feb 24, 2013
88% American Beauty (1999) This amazing and impassioned fantasia about American loneliness begins as satire and ends with a vision of the sublime.‐ New Yorker
Posted Feb 24, 2013
97% Casablanca (1942) Casablanca is the most sociable, the most companionable film ever made. Life as an endless party. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Feb 19, 2013
81% The Impossible (2012) Alas, the movie tells a rather commonplace story.‐ New Yorker
Posted Jan 28, 2013
98% 56 Up (2013) Inevitably, one looks in the mirror afterward and thinks, What have I lost? What have I gained? And at what cost?‐ New Yorker
Posted Jan 28, 2013
43% On the Road (2012) A pleasant but undistinguished adaptation of Jack Kerouac's 1957 novel about himself and his Beat friends in the late forties.‐ New Yorker
Posted Jan 14, 2013
75% Hope Springs (2012) The film, a rehab job on a beached marriage, displays the most tender respect, the most exquisite tact, and yet it would be completely unwatchable -- an outright embarrassment -- with any other actors than Tommy Lee Jones and Meryl Streep. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Jan 8, 2013
92% Zero Dark Thirty (2013) It combines ruthlessness and humanity in a manner that is paradoxical and disconcerting yet satisfying as art. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Dec 17, 2012
51% This is 40 (2012) Here is all the plenitude and warmth and the triviality and sadness of Los Angeles life. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Dec 17, 2012
93% The Central Park Five (2012) Central Park is at first discomforting, then enraging, then illuminating. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Dec 5, 2012
37% Hyde Park on Hudson (2012) We can accept that F.D.R. was a charming cad, but if he weren't a great deal more than that there would be no reason to put him at the center of a movie. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Dec 5, 2012
92% Silver Linings Playbook (2012) Pretty much a miscalculation from beginning to end. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 20, 2012
87% Life of Pi (2012) The film, at its best, celebrates the idiosyncratic wonders and dangers of raw, ravaging nature. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 20, 2012
93% Skyfall (2012) The director, Sam Mendes, has taken a pop concept and solemnized it with Freud, which is not, perhaps, the best way of turning Bond into grownup entertainment. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 8, 2012
78% Flight (2012) At a certain point, great actors want to show us the truth of something that may be far from their lives but that somehow they understand, intimately, all too well. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 8, 2012
82% Seven Psychopaths (2012) The kind of messy, absurdist movie that can lift you out of a crappy mood-at least for a while.‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 22, 2012
91% Holy Motors (2012) Carax produces the startling dislocations of reality that Buñuel pulled off, but without the gleeful wit.‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 22, 2012
93% The Sessions (2012) The movie is so clammily sensitive and tame that it stifles any strong response.‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 22, 2012
78% A Late Quartet (2012) Adultery, unfulfilled ambition, envy, mother-daughter tensions, disease-all the standard and predictable conflicts are there, as in a soap opera.‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 22, 2012
85% The Sixth Sense (1999) A delicate, emotionally attentive, but very scary ghost story. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 10, 2012
86% The Blair Witch Project (1999) A cunningly conceived and crafted exercise in suggestibility and terror.‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 9, 2012
51% Trouble with the Curve (2012) Lorenz ... lays in everything methodically, fully, but without much invention or energy; you can imagine each plot development ten minutes before it arrives.‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 8, 2012
43% The Paperboy (2012) It's a good story about people who are not what they seem, about identity wavering in the heat-a true swamp tale-but the movie is messily ineffective.‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 8, 2012