David StrattonDVD Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

David Stratton

David Stratton
David Stratton's reviews (from any publication) always count toward the Tomatometer because this critic is a Tomatometer-approved critic.

DVD Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3.5/5 34% Live By Night (2017) Individual sequences are also compellingly handled and, as Affleck has demonstrated in his previous films as director... he's an accomplished storyteller.Yet the film doesn't entirely hang together. ‐ The Australian
Posted Jan 20, 2017
3.5/5 76% Split (2017) In his best film since The Sixth Sense, Shyamalan employs menacing close-ups to create a mood of threatening claustrophobia. ‐ The Australian
Posted Jan 20, 2017
4/5 87% Lion (2016) Crucial to these early scenes is the casting of Sunny Pawar, a marvellously instinctive child actor who gives an indelible performance as Saroo. ‐ The Australian
Posted Jan 13, 2017
4/5 95% The Edge of Seventeen (2016) The Edge of Seventeen, the feature debut from writer Kelly Fremon Craig, stands out above the countless other teenage movies from recent years by virtue of its honesty and realism. ‐ The Australian
Posted Jan 13, 2017
4/5 89% Jackie (2016) From the beginning of the film, with its mournful, atonal music score by Mica Levi, it's obvious that this is no conventional dramatisation of the events that arguably brought to an end America's innocence. ‐ The Australian
Posted Jan 6, 2017
2.5/5 12% Collateral Beauty (2016) As it proceeds the plot becomes increasingly predictable and the "surprise" elements will surprise only the most credulous. ‐ The Australian
Posted Jan 6, 2017
4/5 96% Paterson (2016) The film is as innocent as it is gentle, and viewing it is a truly sublime experience. ‐ The Australian
Posted Dec 23, 2016
4/5 100% Rosalie Blum (2016) Khojandi is a convincingly hangdog hero, while Asaaz is a delightfully daffy Aude whose laziness and eccentric lifestyle become quite endearing. Rosalie is more of an enigma, but that's as it should be. ‐ The Australian
Posted Dec 23, 2016
4/5 89% A United Kingdom (2017) The lovers are played by David Oyelowo, whose recent roles in Selma and Queen of Katwe have established him as a major talent, and the sublime Rosamund Pike, whose Ruth is every bit as courageous as her husband. ‐ The Australian
Posted Dec 16, 2016
4.5/5 93% La La Land (2016) The film's opening sequence is jaw-droppingly wonderful. ‐ The Australian
Posted Dec 16, 2016
2.5/5 27% Golden Years (2016) Every member of the cast... deserved a better, less far-fetched, plot than director John Miller and writers Miller, Nick Knowles and Jeremy Sheldon have devised for them. ‐ The Australian
Posted Dec 9, 2016
3.5/5 85% The Patriarch (Mahana) (2016) Though the basic narrative arc is a familiar one, it makes for a mostly rewarding film thanks to its spectacular setting. New Zealand's pastoral vistas are handsomely photographed by Ginny Loane. ‐ The Australian
Posted Dec 9, 2016
3.5/5 79% Dancer (2016) Steven Cantor's film is a detailed portrait of an enormously talented artist who seems to have been unable to cope with fame and the separation from his family. The dance scenes are spectacular. ‐ The Australian
Posted Dec 2, 2016
2.5/5 38% Up for Love (Un homme à la hauteur) (2016) The nagging feeling remains that for a film that appears to position itself as a comedic assault on political correctness, it pulls too many punches. ‐ The Australian
Posted Dec 2, 2016
2.5/5 56% The Legend of Ben Hall (2016) As portrayed by Jack Martin, the bushranger is an imposing figure, tall craggy, blue-eyed and charming when he wants to be. But his motivations, except for the fact he wants his son back, remain sketchy. ‐ The Australian
Posted Dec 2, 2016
3.5/5 96% The Fencer (Miekkailija) (2015) It's an assured piece of work and, as confidently directed by Klaus Haro, it intrigues for much of its length, building to a suspenseful climax. ‐ The Australian
Posted Nov 29, 2016
4/5 82% The Founder (2017) Keaton is superb in this role, convincingly repulsive as the conscience-free go-getter who thinks nothing of betraying his professional and personal relationships to get to the top. ‐ The Australian
Posted Nov 29, 2016
4.5/5 92% I, Daniel Blake (2016) People such as Dan and Katie are usually just statistics: by allowing us to get to know the reality, humanity and heartbreak behind these statistics, Loach has made one of his finest films. ‐ The Australian
Posted Nov 18, 2016
2.5/5 60% War on Everyone (2017) The film barrels along from one violent encounter to another without inviting much audience involvement. ‐ The Australian
Posted Nov 18, 2016
4/5 72% Nocturnal Animals (2016) A bewitching blend of classical and modernist cinema. ‐ The Australian
Posted Nov 11, 2016
4/5 94% Arrival (2016) Visually the film is as impressive as you may wish, and the sense of unease is augmented by the offbeat music score by Johann Johannsson. ‐ The Australian
Posted Nov 11, 2016
4/5 86% Hacksaw Ridge (2016) As director, Gibson's approach is bold and fearless; this represents his best work to date behind the camera. ‐ The Australian
Posted Nov 4, 2016
4/5 60% The Light Between Oceans (2016) For those who have not read the book, there are some significant surprises in store -- while those who have will, I think, be satisfied with this handsome adaptation. ‐ The Australian
Posted Nov 4, 2016
4.5/5 88% Elle (2016) This dark and sometimes grimly amusing film has been compared to the work of Brian de Palma, but to me it seems more like a blending of Hitchcock and Luis Bunuel. ‐ The Australian
Posted Oct 28, 2016
4/5 98% Hell or High Water (2016) Scottish director David Mackenzie employs the keen eye of an outsider to evoke this very particular world. The film is firmly planted in reality, down to the smallest detail. ‐ The Australian
Posted Oct 28, 2016
1.5/5 57% The Neon Demon (2016) A guilty pleasure should at least be entertaining on a basic level, and that's something The Neon Demon is certainly not. ‐ The Australian
Posted Oct 21, 2016
2/5 19% Keeping Up With The Joneses (2016) A turgid, lifeless comedy in which jokes about defecation and even torture are supposed to amuse the viewer. ‐ The Australian
Posted Oct 21, 2016
3.5/5 97% Heart of a Dog (2015) An unclassifiable but strangely charming combination of reminiscence and fantasy, this is worth seeking out not only for Anderson fans but also for anyone interested in experimental cinema. ‐ The Australian
Posted Oct 21, 2016
3/5 70% Café Society (2016) As if to compensate for the fact the basic material is, frankly, thin, Allen and his technical team have made certain that visually this is one of his most satisfying films. ‐ The Australian
Posted Oct 14, 2016
2.5/5 19% Inferno (2016) Howard all too often fails to stage key scenes with the clarity they require, adding to the confusion. ‐ The Australian
Posted Oct 14, 2016
4/5 83% Julieta (2016) Julieta may not be Almodovar's finest film, but it's still a terrific movie. ‐ The Australian
Posted Oct 7, 2016
3/5 43% The Girl on the Train (2016) [The Girl on the Train] is, in the end, a competent but by no means outstanding potboiler, with a better-than-it-deserves lead performance and a terrific music score from Danny Elfman. ‐ The Australian
Posted Oct 7, 2016
4/5 100% Wednesday, May 9 (Chaharshanbeh, 19 Ordibehesht) (2015) The film is so effective on a basic emotional level that the number of international awards it has received comes as no surprise. ‐ The Australian
Posted Oct 6, 2016
3/5 93% I Am Not a Serial Killer (2016) A moderately suspenseful low-budget thriller. ‐ The Australian
Posted Sep 30, 2016
3.5/5 64% Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (2016) For much of the film's length we find him in his element, taking advantage of what was clearly a generous budget to indulge his fantasies. ‐ The Australian
Posted Sep 30, 2016
4/5 61% Snowden (2016) Some Stone films, such as JFK, Nixon and Born on the Fourth of July, have been bombastic in approach; Snowden is surprisingly low key, and all the more effective for that. ‐ The Australian
Posted Sep 23, 2016
2/5 63% The Magnificent Seven (2016) Politically bizarre, the film is competent but routine. ‐ The Australian
Posted Sep 23, 2016
4/5 95% The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years (2016) Beatles fans will relish this musically rich trip down memory lane, while even the uninitiated will surely be impressed by the talent, humour and, yes, class on display. ‐ The Australian
Posted Sep 16, 2016
4/5 92% Summertime (La Belle Saison) (2016) The film is distinguished by magnificent photography by Jeanne Lapoirie and by the insightful screenplay by the director and Laurette Polmanss. It's enjoying a very limited cinema release, but is well worth checking out. ‐ The Australian
Posted Sep 16, 2016
4/5 85% Sully (2016) Eastwood handles all of this with his customary relaxed skill. ‐ The Australian
Posted Sep 9, 2016
3.5/5 82% Captain Fantastic (2016) This debut feature from writer-director Matt Ross is a consistently interesting and involving exploration of an alternative lifestyle and how it works -- with all its pluses and minuses -- in the 21st century. ‐ The Australian
Posted Sep 9, 2016
1/5 25% Ben-Hur (2016) Anyone wanting to experience the "bigness" of Ben-Hur would be advised to check out the 1959 or even the 1925 versions of the story -- both are vastly superior to this lamentable effort. ‐ The Australian
Posted Sep 2, 2016
3/5 89% Blood Father (2016) It's no masterpiece, but it's a moderately enjoyable ride and it's good to see Gibson back on form for the first time in quite a while. ‐ The Australian
Posted Sep 2, 2016
1.5/5 9% Endless Night (Nadie quiere la noche) (2015) At times Endless Night really does seem endless; those long winter nights are difficult to endure -- and, sadly, that also goes for the film. ‐ The Australian
Posted Aug 26, 2016
4/5 81% Sunset Song (2016) Davies is in no hurry to tell this intimate story, and he handles it with his customary sensitivity, confirming his status as one of Britain's finest contemporary directors. ‐ The Australian
Posted Aug 26, 2016
2.5/5 78% The Shallows (2016) The realism of the early scenes -- leaving aside Nancy's unaccountable willingness to be stranded alone in a remote place -- is replaced by increasingly silly scenes that lead eventually to a nonsensical conclusion. ‐ The Australian
Posted Aug 19, 2016
4/5 61% High-Rise (2016) It's a very British subject, this obsession with class differences and class warfare, but Wheatley's compelling handling of the material -- though criticised in some quarters for its deliberately alienating elements -- seems on the mark. ‐ The Australian
Posted Aug 19, 2016
4/5 93% The Madness of King George (1994) Visually sumptuous, energetic and classy, The Madness of King George is British film theatre at its most seductive. ‐ At the Movies (Australia)
Posted Aug 17, 2016
2.5/5 61% Down Under (2016) The film falls short because it falls between two stools: as a reminder of a shameful period in our recent history it's too interested in finding cheap laughs, and as a comedy it's just too painful and ugly. ‐ The Australian
Posted Aug 12, 2016
4/5 100% Truman (2015) A quiet humour suffuses this tender insight into the importance of friendship. ‐ The Australian
Posted Aug 12, 2016