Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
67% Little Murders (1971) Often exceedingly funny. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2020
79% Summer of '42 (1971) Summer of '42 is one of those rare films yon can't help liking simply for its aspirations which are so honest and open-minded. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2020
66% The Andromeda Strain (1971) It is, in fact, quite a proficient example of the science fiction genre, though I can't help thinking that 130 minutes is too long for anything non-Kubrick. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2020
20% Doctors' Wives (1971) The hoot of the week is undoubtedly George Schaefer's Doctors' Wives, which I urge you to see at the [theater], preferably when drunk. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2020
86% Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971) A most impressive achievement, superbly edited by its maker into a whole that is almost as satisfactory as its parts. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2020
96% Viridiana (1961) One of the cinema's inalienable masterpieces. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted May 14, 2020
No Score Yet The Wanderer (Le Grand Meaulnes) (1969) The ambience of the little French village where the tragedy resolves Itself is marvellously conveyed. The landscape of Sologne could scarcely be more breathtaking. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted May 14, 2020
94% Murmur of the Heart (1971) It casts a fresh, vigorous and unclouded eye on adolescence as it really is rather than as we would like it to be. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted May 14, 2020
25% The River (1984) Nobody can prevent The River looking more like an attractive gesture rather than the real thing. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 17, 2020
93% Blue Velvet (1986) Love it or hate it, see it you must. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 9, 2020
57% A Love in Germany (Eine Liebe in Deutschland) (1983) The grim inevitability of the tragedy, which someone like Fassbinder might have enlightened with another of his lessons on "everyday fascism," is treated with a heavier, less convincing hand by Wajda. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2020
89% Places in the Heart (1984) I have no doubt that Robert Benton's Oscar-nominated Places In The Hear is a sincere film. But I find it pretty egregious just the same, covered with a thin layer of Hollywood treacle that consistently' prevents it packing the emotional punch intended. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2020
11% The Hunting Party (1971) A savage and silly Western, wildly overcooked by Don Medford and glazedly played by Oliver Reed, Candice Bergen and Gene Hackman. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2020
No Score Yet Joe Cocker: Mad Dogs and Englishmen (1971) Cocker is frequently superb, his backing is excellent and the whole thing very reasonable value in a more relaxed way than Gimme Shelter. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2020
No Score Yet Unman, Wittering and Zigo (1971) John Mackenzie's first feature isn't badly done, but the result is a prime example of what happens when nothing is left to the imagination In a too literal translation from sound into sight. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2020
83% Private Road (1971) Whatever its limitations -- and there are some -- it tries very hard to get near to what things are like here and now, what pressures people face and what they do about them. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2020
88% Monty Python's And Now for Something Completely Different (1972) [And Now for Something Completely Different] includes some of the best items... without quite convincing that what was marvellous in weekly half-hour doses stands up as ninety minutes of cinema. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2020
97% Tristana (1970) What more is there to say about Bunuel? Except that Tristana... is a quite masterly summation of his art. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2020
33% Catch Me a Spy (1971) It is flaccid and ham-fisted at one and the same time, a comedy-cum-romance-cum-thriller with a starry international cast who have absolutely nowhere to go. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 19, 2020
75% The Hellstrom Chronicle (1971) It is still the most extraordinary film which alternates the stunningly beautiful with the intensely ugly so tantalisingly that you begin to wonder which is which. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 19, 2020
50% Zachariah (1971) Zachariah proclaims itself the first electric Western but has little distinction otherwise. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 19, 2020
96% Wake in Fright (2012) [It] will will not please the Australian Tourist Board. It may not even please Australians. But it ranks, along with Nicholas Roeg's Walkabout, as the most impressive piece of special pleading about the country I've seen. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 19, 2020
42% The Grissom Gang (1971) It is an exercise in a vacuum which gets no orchids from me. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 19, 2020
67% The Devils (1971) What is quite certain is that Russell has been true to himself as never before and that in doing so, he will irritate, excite, bore and outrage more film-goers than ever before. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 18, 2020
30% The Horsemen (1971) I refuse to believe that the dreadful Hollywood-archaic screenplay which numbs The Horsemen (Astoria) was entirely the work of Dalton Trumbo as the credits vouchsafe. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 18, 2020
100% Blue Water, White Death (1971) It's quite a documentary. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 18, 2020
67% King Lear (1971) Even if it doesn't wholly convince. the film was surely worth the try. Taken in isolation, there's some astonishing work involved. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 18, 2020
93% Klute (1971) This is done with remarkably little dialogue but with a tremendous sense of tension and atmosphere. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 11, 2020
68% The Touch (1971) It is perhaps not one of the Swedish directors great works. But for three parts of the way, it rivets the attention, not least because he has secured from Bibi Andersson a performance that is superb even by her exalted standards. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 11, 2020
65% Bedknobs and Broomsticks (1971) David Tomlinson does his English Fred MacMurray act rather well, Miss Lansbury is as watchable as always and the children aren't too awful. It'll take a mint of money, but not mine. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 11, 2020
84% Walkabout (1971) There is always this feeling that Roeg, the cameraman for Fahrenheit 451 and Far from the Madding Crowd has a positive and original talent bursting to be developed. It's just a case of what that talent is going to find to say. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 11, 2020
92% The Marriage of Maria Braun (Die Ehe der Maria Braun) (1979) Schygulla gives a magnificent performance as a vulnerable young woman who becomes a self-confident, independent and competent survivor yet still comes to a bad end, largely because of the basic corruption of her world - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted May 16, 2019
47% Miami Vice (2006) A deadly serious, stylishly noirish, but fundamentally insubstantial thriller. - London Evening Standard EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 10, 2018
2/5 No Score Yet Tomorrow La Scala! (2002) Plenty of warmth, but never quite enough bite. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 10, 2018
77% Fellini Satyricon (1969) Stunning camerawork in deliberately garish colour from Giuseppe Rotunna, incomparable art direction, and some riveting music from Nini Rota aid Fellini in his principal task, which is simply to astonish and to widen the imagination. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2018
95% The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser (Jeder für sich und Gott gegen alle)(Every Man for Himself and God Against All) (1974) Kaspar Hauser is one of the most fascinating of films. At his best, Herzog is like no other film-maker I know. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2018
94% Fargo (1996) The Coen Brothers are among the most able practitioners in America and this film is one of their best attempts to turn a familiar genre -- the True Crime drama -- into something miles away from the ordinary. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2018
100% Toy Story (1995) The rivalry between Woody the cowboy and Buzz the astronaut is worked out as a direct parallel to any other family quarrels and it is this sense of oneness that gives the film its kick. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2018
92% Ed Wood (1994) Burton imitates Wood 's films brilliantly, and Wood 's chaotic lifestyle is brought to the screen with brio. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2018
92% The Piano (1993) The Piano is certainly one of the best films of the year and proves without doubt, if we didn't know it already, that Campion is now a major talent. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2018
92% Reservoir Dogs (1992) No one should go to Reservoir Dogs without prior thought. But what they will see is a riveting treatise on the theme of betrayal set in an urban wasteland that murders hope and makes redemption virtually impossible. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2018
87% Slacker (1991) On the whole, this is a fascinating example of apparently fly-on-the-wall film-making, made all the more intriguing when you discover it was all planned like a military exercise. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2018
93% Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) It is both a civilised comedy with iron in its soul and a serious examination of our inner fears that also manages to be very funny. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2018
82% The Untouchables (1987) The Untouchables is two hours of fairly solid entertainment, an eventually uplifting parable about right beating might, cast in the form of a Warner Brothers social realist picture of the thirties. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2018
98% E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (1982) E.T. ...comes to a beleaguered industry like a gift from the gods. Not only does it get bums on seats but it encourages the kind of shared enjoyment that suggests the cinema still has something unique to offer. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2018
90% Misery (1990) The film hasn't any depth to speak of, but is consistently shrewd enough not to go totally obvious ways. And the audacity in casting Kathy Bates as the dotty fan pays considerable dividends. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted May 9, 2017
91% A Short Film About Killing (1988) While it is almost impossible to conceive of Kieslowski making a bad film, in the Decalogue, and particularly in Killing, style and content were perfectly matched. - Guardian EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 11, 2017
80% Personal Shopper (2017) Assayas is clearly enjoying himself with his ghost story and has certainly got a very decent performance out of Stewart. - Huffington Post EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 1, 2017
85% The Transfiguration (2017) There are plenty of references to other vampire and horror movies. But The Transfiguration remains a unique take on such things. - Huffington Post EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 1, 2017
85% Hacksaw Ridge (2016) The horror of war, at least for the boots on the ground, has seldom been more apparent. You leave the theatre more than a trifle stunned. - Huffington Post EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 1, 2017