Dustin Chang

Dustin Chang
Tomatometer-approved critic
Biography:
An adventurous spectator and an occasional practitioner of all things cinema.

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
57% The Beautiful Person (La Belle Personne) (2008) Unlike the observation of a cafe owner, that teenage girls are as delicate as a glass. No matter what the circumstance, she is stronger than you and she can destroy you. Honoré too understands, about fleeting nature of love and its unfairness. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2021
94% Liverpool (2008) Alonso is trying to find something, through each of his films. It might be something transcendental, a reflection of human nature, frailty, loneliness.... I am just mesmerized by all of it. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2021
No Score Yet Un Lac (2008) Sound of whirring wind, river, rain, snow, breathing, footsteps, etc., are always present, accompanying the dark, grainy imagery and making Un Lac a living, pulsating entity, much like an injured horse in the film. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2021
No Score Yet Manjadikuru (2013) Manjadikuru unfolds like a good memoir. The intricacy and eye for details by the first time director Anjali Menon, from her own experience growing up, are just extraordinary. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2021
76% The Exploding Girl (2010) This economically done film belongs to Kazan- with a lot of tight close ups, we intimately get to observe Ivy, a rather introverted, unremarkable college girl. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2021
43% The Limits of Control (2009) Less hypnotic than Dead Man but infinitely more interesting than anything else he's done since, Limits of Control is more of an exercise in Jarmusch-ism. - International Cinephile Society EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2021
No Score Yet Kurôn wa kokyô o mezasu (The Clone Returns Home) (The Clone Returns to the Homeland) (2008) Kanji Nakajima's meta-physical Japanese sci-fi illustrates the moral implications of human cloning in a very direct yet elegant manner. - ScreenAnarchy EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2021
87% Our Beloved Month of August (2010) The original story which director had is some cliché summer fling story. But it becomes much more poignant because of the films first 2/3rds. There is fluidity to Gomes's filmmaking that is gentle yet furiously inventive. It's a great film. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2021
90% Hunger (2008) Fassbender's portrayal of man of conviction is quite astonishing. Whether you agree with IRA's tactics to achieve their political aim, one can't take away Sands' conviction in his beliefs. And that's beautiful. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
87% Our Beloved Month of August (2010) The original story which director had is some cliché summer fling story. But it becomes much more poignant because of the films first 2/3rds. There is fluidity to Gomes's filmmaking that is gentle yet furiously inventive. It's a great film. - International Cinephile Society EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
69% Synecdoche, New York (2008) Kaufman touches upon universal theme of loneliness and melancholy through the eyes of an obsessive artist who builds a replica of life on stage within the replica, within the replica, within the replica... with depth and intimacy. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
97% 35 Rhums (35 Shots of Rum) (2008) Said to be an homage to Ozu, 35 rhums comfortably slips in to the universality of human conditions. Paper lanterns in Germany, rice cookers in an African household in France are completely in harmony with their surroundings. It's a beautiful film. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
65% Watchmen (2009) Snyder's tongue in cheek graphic novel adaptation gets the most of it right faithfully, from two dimensional feel of the imagery with new age-y primary color-palette to Alan Moore's cynical exploration of the ugly side of Humanity. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
73% Julia (2009) The film keeps you on your toes as to where it is headed, breaking all the conventional cliché plotlines. And it's Swinton's finest hour since Deep End, as a conflicted, less than perfect small time crook finding her way. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
43% The Limits of Control (2009) Only Jarmusch can get away with pretentious movie about art like this. Less hypnotic than Dead Man but infinitely more interesting than anything else he's done since, Limits of Control is more of an exercise in Jarmusch-ism. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
93% La Nana (The Maid) (2009) The Maid features one of my favorite movie endings in recent years. Slice of life that is both touching and real. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
85% Ddongpari (Breathless) (2009) By the time the emotionally charged climax rolls around, we are completely invested in this hard-to-love brut. Yang has more in common with Shane Meadows way of filmmaking than what its English title evokes. - ScreenAnarchy EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
86% Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans (2009) Cage is in his top form. Under the firm hands of Herzog, his usual overacting comes across as funny and even endearing. Clocking at lean mean 2 hours, Port of Call New Orleans has no fat and is dry as a feather in its post-Katrina setting. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
94% Tokyo Sonata (Tokyo Sonata) (2009) Kurosawa manages to hover right above all the stereotypical situations and makes it work with great editing, sound and intimate cinematography(by Akiko Ashizawa). And one of the most beautiful endings I've seen in movies in years. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
No Score Yet Kurôn wa kokyô o mezasu (The Clone Returns Home) (The Clone Returns to the Homeland) (2008) There are creepy yet stunningly beautiful images as the ghosts materialize themselves as past meets present. Deeply moving and contemplative, The Clone Returns Home is one of the most stunning debut features in years. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
67% The Missing Person (2009) With its deliberate episodic pacing, arduous monologues, forever tracking shots, mix of B&W/color photography, a lot of intriguing supporting characters and a lot of film references, the film is a truly astounding cinematic examination of unrequited love. - ScreenAnarchy EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
67% The Missing Person (2009) The Missing Person says a lot about mutual understanding, fraternity in tragedy. It also says about that there will always be opportunities to make profits off of it. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
No Score Yet Regrets (Les regrets) (2009) With measured and effective Philip Glass's score and Nina Simone's Sinnerman bookending the film, this contemplation on regrets (in which most great literature/art is based upon) gets high marks from me. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
67% Altiplano (Fragments of Grace) (2010) Set in otherworldly Andes backdrop, Altiplano is bravura filmmaking at its best- colors, music, camera movements and unforgettable images mixed in with myth and spirituality conjuring up emotions like no other. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
88% Alle Anderen (Everyone Else) (2010) Simple in its aesthetics (heavily dependent upon two leads' actings) and brutally honest in its depiction, this 'relationship drama' rings very true to me. Very refreshing. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
69% The Runaways (2010) Okay, on paper, Bare Essence of Life is goofy as hell. Its plot is shoddy and the mix of realistic settings and surrealistic elements doesn't always work. But Satoko Yokohama's film is completely original and fresh. - ScreenAnarchy EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
69% The Runaways (2010) Based on the memoir Neon Angel: The Cherie Currie Story and executive produced by Joan Jett, this all-girl rock band biopic hits all the right notes in all the right places. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
No Score Yet Dear Doctor (2009) With pitch perfect stellar performances from everyone involved and gorgeous cinematography by Katsumi Yanagijima (Dolls, Battle Royal), Dear Doctor is a great, if not a little old-fashioned dramedy with a big heart. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2021
70% The Housemaid (2011) Im saves the grotesquery of the wealthy to the last minute. But the build up (to the not so subtle climax and ending that can be read as slapdash) is so engaging and understated that it only amplifies the brilliance of Im's precision filmmaking. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
92% Beetle Queen Conquers Tokyo (2009) More of an anthropological essay than straight-up documentary, Beetle Queen shows the latest craze in Japanese culture. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
56% Non Ma Fille, Tu N'iras Pas Danser (Making Plans for Lena) (2010) Chiara Mastroianni is nothing short of a revelation as a discombobulated mom of two, dealing with well meaning but nosy parents, sibling rivalry and her estranged husband whom she can't ever get over. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
98% Marwencol (2010) Malmberg's documentary is tender and intimate. Horgancamp is never treated or seen as a freak but a genuine folk artist with great imagination. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
85% Black Swan (2010) Black Swan is way over the top (not that his films were ever subtle) in saint/whore dichotomy with bombastic Swan Lake score. But it fits with visceral visuals creating internal chaos in the character. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
94% Winter's Bone (2010) Debra Granik's depiction of the Ozarks is never patronizing nor sentimental. Winter's Bone is filled with the lives of the locals in great detail and presented with great care, nothing seems out of place. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
70% Never Let Me Go (2010) It was Kazuo Ishiguro's appropriation of this hope with young love that really spoke to me when I read the book. And it's carried out beautifully here by Mulligan, Keira Knightley and Andrew Garfield. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
96% Exit Through The Gift Shop (2010) It is a very well made, good archival material for street art movement, with a lot of humor: the guerrilla style, tag-and-run aesthetic brings a lot of funny, entertaining moments. It also questions the nature of art and art as commodity - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
58% Film socialisme (2011) Here Godard sees a giant cruise ship as a metaphor for Europe- decadent, crass, greedy people enjoying luxury largely serviced by non-European workers, sailing an uncharted territory surrounded by ominous, choppy water. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
86% White Material (2010) White Material is not her most abstract film yet Denis still manages to keep the film absorbing and enigmatic without ever being didactic or boring. It's definitely headier and feels more substantial than her other works. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
92% Into The Abyss (2011) With no traces of cynicism or sly wit, Into the Abyss is a particularly straightforward documentary. Thoroughly inquisitive and contemplative, Herzog seems to be saying enough is enough. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
75% La belle endormie (The Sleeping Beauty) (2011) Breillat's second interpretation of the fairy tale trilogy (first Bluebeard and Beauty and the Beast planned), is much more playful and sumptuous (from production design to cinematography) than her previous efforts I've seen by her. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
92% Tabloid (2011) In the age of Newscorp scandal and sensationalized murder trials, Joyce McKinney story seems fun and innocent. Morris is on top of his game and has never been any more entertaining than this. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
No Score Yet Gekijouban Shinsei kamatte-chan: Rokkun rôru wa nari tomaranai (Ringing in Their Ears) (2011) It makes sense that Irie, who demonstrated the knack for channeling the disaffected youth in his previous efforts, is the one showcasing this Chiba based), web savvy, word-of-mouth, indie rock phenom. And it just happens to have kick-ass music too. - ScreenAnarchy EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
96% Tomboy (2011) As with her debut, Celine Sciamma has a knack for getting amazing performances out of her young actors. Particularly, Zoé Héran is a revelation. Her portrayal of a confused child (not of her sexuality but the sexual politics) is touching and deeply felt. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
79% Shame (2011) A reflective/introspective look at society's ills in the time of economic crisis and the world in turmoil is perhaps not very well timed. And Brandon's sexual escapades in the last act reach almost a comedic level. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
81% Super 8 (2011) There is no way I can write a legit review of Super 8 without sounding corny. But this nostalgic look at movie-making hits all the right spots for me. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
89% Certified Copy (Copie Conforme) (2011) I realized while watching it, that Kiarostami was at it with his magic again, completely blowing away my expections of what the movie was going to be with his elegance in simplicity. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
71% Hanna (2011) The 'perfectly engineered soldier' theme is nothing new, but Wright is less concerned about that. Hanna is a beautifully crafted, smart, funny film that floats above its genre conventions. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
97% Project Nim (2011) Nim is obviously a sentient being and also a wild animal. While not making a villain out of just one person, Marsh reflects on how we tend to treat animals in general. It's a heartbreaking doc and one of the year's best. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
73% Curling (2010) Anchored by the down-to-earth performances from his two leads, Côté skillfully balances the film from going too quirky or too dark. It's one of those films that will linger in your head for days. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021
96% Cave of Forgotten Dreams (2011) This little experiment (said to be the first and the last 3D film by him) confirms that Herzog does whatever he feels like, never following trend, but with astounding consistency. It fits within his body of work very smoothly. - Floating World EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2021