Edmund Lee Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Edmund Lee

Edmund Lee
Edmund Lee's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Screen International, South China Morning Post

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
1.5/5 33% Kampai! For the Love of Sake (2016) The best way to screen this might well be as an infomercial at sake conventions, where viewers are free to sample minutes-long clips set against an incessant soundtrack of bland, easy-listening music.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Jul 19, 2017
2/5 No Score Yet Meow (2017) A wacky family comedy imbued with a touch of lazily scripted sci-fi fantasy that suggests it's pitched at pre-teens.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2017
4/5 91% Our Time Will Come (2017) Hui makes the most of her cast - boasting a notable number of Hong Kong Film Awards winners - to fashion an unapologetically human drama.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Jul 4, 2017
5/5 No Score Yet Xianggang zhizao (Made in Hong Kong) (1997) Made in Hong Kong forms the first part of Fruit Chan Gor's "1997 Trilogy", and is shot with a rawness and urgency that would in time become the writer-director's signature.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
3.5/5 No Score Yet Mad World (Yat nim mou ming) (2016) Mad World is not quite the profound reflection of reality its makers intended it to be, but despite its flaws this is a brave film.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2017
2/5 No Score Yet 77 Heartbreaks (Yuen Loeng Taa 77 Chi) (2017) 77 Heartbreaks, despite its peculiar premise, has nothing interesting to say about contemporary mating mores, although I was surprised -- and occasionally amused -- by its long line of supporting stars.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
3/5 88% God of War (2017) A respectable period action drama that frequently loses its steam to redundant scenes.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2017
3.5/5 80% Polina (Polina, danser sa vie) (2017) Shunning the crowd-pleasing, life-affirming tendencies of mainstream dance movies, Polina instead offers a lyrical and introspective look at the intricate process of finding one's true artistic calling.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2017
3.5/5 64% Porto (2016) A sensual and uncompromisingly heartbreaking account of a one-night stand that fizzles out into two lives of lingering regrets.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted May 31, 2017
3/5 No Score Yet With Prisoners (2017) With Prisoners offers a nightmarish account of institutional depravity, one said by its makers to be based on real events.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted May 17, 2017
3/5 35% The Last Word (2017) MacLaine is the only reason this movie works.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted May 10, 2017
3/5 67% This Is Not What I Expected (2017) A quirky yet predictable film made special by its reverence for inspired cooking, the directorial debut of Hong Kong editor Derek Hui is more food porn than romantic comedy.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted May 3, 2017
3/5 100% Love Off the Cuff (2017) It's fun, but a little frivolous.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2017
2/5 13% Brain on Fire (2016) The true-life medical drama is less likely to bring awareness to a very rare autoimmune disorder than it is to be consumed as a low-rent imitator of Safe, Todd Haynes' 1995 parable.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
4/5 97% The Salesman (Forushande) (2017) The Salesman is a meticulously plotted moral puzzle that, once again, shows how great art can transcend the deeply restrained culture it springs from.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
1.5/5 No Score Yet Mission Milano (Tou tian te wu) (2016) This big-budget action comedy is so sloppily written and utterly derivative that it may struggle to register in your mind even before end credits roll.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Apr 21, 2017
3/5 No Score Yet Love Contractually (2017) While it's a tonally uneven and sometimes implausibly scripted popcorn movie, Love Contractually would have been far less gratifying if not for its pair of very pleasant leads.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Apr 21, 2017
3/5 80% Shock Wave (2017) Yau does an impressive job of keeping the audience engaged amid the barrage of car crashes, shoot-outs and explosions.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Apr 21, 2017
4/5 100% Harmonium (Fuchi ni tatsu) (2017) Fukada's film sidesteps easy catharsis to stage a serious, and quite emotionally intense, inquiry into the unknown shades of human nature.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2017
2/5 91% On the Beach at Night Alone (Bamui haebyun-eoseo honja) (2017) It'll likely take a diehard Hong fan to truly admire this dreamily scripted fare, lacking as it does the writer-director's usually rigorous musing on fate and perception.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2017
2.5/5 No Score Yet Drowning Love (Oboreru Knife) (2016) The raw emotions of young love are captured in alternately ecstatic and frustrating fashion in Drowning Love, based on George Asakura's eponymous manga series.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Mar 15, 2017
3.5/5 No Score Yet Eternity (Eternité) (2016) Put aside your longing for a conventional narrative, and Tran's exquisite tone poem could yet prove to be one of the most beautifully poignant films you'll come across in some time.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Mar 15, 2017
3/5 No Score Yet Vampire Cleanup Department (Gao geung jing dou fu) (2017) An adequate homage to the comedic tradition immortalised by Mr Vampire (1985) and its sequels.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Mar 15, 2017
3.5/5 100% Tunnel (Teoneol) (2016) A thoroughly engaging drama that is peppered with both improbably dark humour and pungent attempts at social commentary.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Mar 7, 2017
3.5/5 No Score Yet Confidential Assignment (2017) Its narrative makes little sense, but the film is so entertaining audiences will overlook its ludicrous plotting and identify with the protagonists.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Mar 1, 2017
2/5 No Score Yet Because I Love You (Saranghagi Ttaemoone) (2017) My Sassy Girl star Cha Tae-hyun plays an inadvertent Cupid in this fantasy melodrama, which merely treats its farfetched body-swapping premise as a convenient [narrative] device.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2017
2.5/5 No Score Yet 52Hz, I Love You (2017) Featuring a cast of pop singers, 52Hz, I Love You proves to be a pleasant trifle, which does a far more effective job of pleasing the ear than stirring the heart.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Feb 7, 2017
2.5/5 50% Journey to the West: The Demons Strike Back (2017) While [the film] is never less than watchable, it's hard to shake the impression that Tsui [Hark] has partly ditched - or maybe failed to replicate - [Stephen] Chow's irreverent sense of humour.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Jan 29, 2017
3/5 82% Perfect Strangers (Perfetti sconosciuti) (2016) A relationship parable for the digital age, Perfect Strangers pits our deceitful natures against our dependence on smartphones, to mostly engaging effect.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Jan 11, 2017
3.5/5 No Score Yet See You Tomorrow (2016) This lushly coloured romantic fable is a bit like the pantomime cousin of Wong's 2046, in which a lovelorn Tony Leung also philosophises in frequent voice-over about the fate of those around him.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Dec 22, 2016
3/5 No Score Yet Death Note: Light Up the New World (Desu nôto: Light Up the New World) (2016) A thrilling but sometimes illogical piece of pulp entertainment that is crafted with impressive style.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Dec 13, 2016
2.5/5 No Score Yet The Kodai Family (2016) [It] begins as an endearing comedy about the psychology of romance, before switching tone and morphing into a laborious will-she-won't-she melodrama with few surprises to offer.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Dec 8, 2016
4/5 No Score Yet Long Excuses (The Long Excuse) (2016) Masahiro Motoki makes it all a joy to watch, lending a complex touch of humanity to an unlikeable role that's more involving than it has presumably any right to be.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Dec 7, 2016
3.5/5 65% A Tale of Love and Darkness (2016) Portman's conviction in the material oozes from this deeply poetic debut.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Dec 4, 2016
3.5/5 64% Sword Master (2016) Sword Master is easily one of the best Chinese-language remakes in recent times.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2016
3.5/5 No Score Yet The Road to Mandalay (2016) A melancholy drama that unfolds at a slow-burning pace, Midi Z's visually engrossing film is elevated by reserved yet indelible turns by Kai Ko and Wu Ke-xi.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2016
2/5 50% Sky On Fire (Chongtian huo) (2016) There's an alarming discrepancy between the Ringo Lam movies we love and the mediocre efforts that he's been producing since the Hong Kong film legend returned to directing.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2016
4/5 84% I Am Not Madame Bovary (2016) A Kafkaesque tale about the Chinese bureaucracy's indifference to the people's legal rights.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2016
3.5/5 72% Remember (2016) This lurid and disorienting story of an old man out for revenge is a Memento-like narrative puzzle enhanced by the immense presence of Christopher Plummer.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2016
3.5/5 No Score Yet Rage (Ikari) (2016) A slow-burning drama on the paranoia and distrust inherent in human relationships.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Nov 10, 2016
4.5/5 98% Your Name. (Kimi No Na Wa.) (2017) One of the most poignant responses to a natural catastrophe that Japanese cinema has offered in the wake of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Nov 9, 2016
2/5 27% Crazy About Tiffany's (2016) The only bubble burst throughout this ode to luxury living? They wonder if Holly Golightly was really "a hooker".‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Nov 2, 2016
2.5/5 No Score Yet One Night Only (2016) One Night Only rarely bores - although it's also peppered with enough artificial plot turns and revelations to keep you from truly feeling for the protagonists.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Nov 1, 2016
3.5/5 No Score Yet Nagasaki: Memories of My Son (2016) You don't need a keen interest in history to be swept up in the deeply poignant delivery of Yoji Yamada's unmistakable anti-war message.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2016
0.5/5 No Score Yet Heartfall Arises (2016) There are over 1.3 billion people in China -- soon to be the largest film market in the world -- so it's hard to understand why the Chinese producers of Heartfall Arises couldn't find one competent writer to produce a script.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Oct 27, 2016
4/5 No Score Yet SoulMate (2016) Derek Tsang's film transcends its potentially cloying premise to tell a story of friendship and love that's at once melancholy and very emotional.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Oct 26, 2016
3/5 82% Front Cover (2016) For all its awkwardness in bridging the personal and the cultural, Front Cover does deliver as a nice little romantic comedy with a pair of endearing leads.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2016
3/5 No Score Yet Buddy Cops (Ying ging hing dai) (2016) This TVB-presented Hong Kong-China co-production [is] a distinctly family-unfriendly movie scattered with bad language, psychotic characters and masturbation jokes.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Oct 22, 2016
4/5 No Score Yet Trivisa (Chu Tai Chiu Fung) (2016) A triple portrait of larger-than-life characters, who are all forced to renegotiate their brash and unruly criminal lifestyles in a dramatically changing political landscape.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Oct 22, 2016
3.5/5 No Score Yet The Mobfathers (2016) Its colourful characters, uninhibited display of gangland violence, and cheeky adaptation of political statements taken from the city's increasingly farcical reality are enough to make this an eloquent footnote in Hong Kong pop culture.‐ South China Morning Post
Read More | Posted Oct 22, 2016