Frank S. Nugent

Frank S. Nugent
Frank S. Nugent's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer® when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New York Times
Publications: New York Times

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
90% Babes in Arms (1939) We definitely don't like the screen play by Jack McGowan and Kay Van Riper. If we must have hokum, let us at least disguise it gracefully, even when it's with music. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2021
92% Tevye (1939) [Tevya], with the famous Maurice Schwartz in the title role, is a serious character with definitely comical overtones. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 10, 2020
75% The Girl from Mexico (1939) A shrill, spirited, senseless slapstick comedy, played at the catch-as-catch-can pace which Miss Velez prefers to set. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 27, 2020
90% Mexican Spitfire (1940) It is slapstick pure and edifyingly simple, well-paced and abundantly pastried, with Lupe Velez and Leon Errol tossing lines and custards with great abandon. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 26, 2020
100% True Confession (1937) Although True Confession had a pulpwood sound, it proved yesterday to be a highly polished, smoothly grained Yule log which deserves to crackle right merrily... from now until well after Christmas. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
100% The Plainsman (1936) The Plainsman is another of those action-crammed, spectacular and inaccurate canvases that Mr. De Mille delights to paint and audiences generally are delighted to see. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 22, 2020
60% Island of Lost Men (1939) [The jungle setting] suggests that if the camera were swung no more than a frame or so to either side it would reveal a filling station, or a roadside food dispensary in the shape of a hot dog. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 22, 2020
83% Anything Goes (1936) It gets by, but without distinction. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 22, 2020
No Score Yet When Were You Born? (1938) It consists merely of using a routine murder mystery as a pretext for expounding the zodiacal rigmarole. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 5, 2019
94% Daughter of Shanghai (1937) A tense, melodramatic atmosphere -- something between Limehouse Nights and I Cover the Waterfront -- is successfully maintained in Daughter of Shanghai. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 16, 2019
20% King of Chinatown (1939) Paramount should have spared us and its cast (Akim Tamiroff, Anna May Wong, Sidney Toler and J. Carrol Naish principally) the necessity of being bothered with such folderol. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 16, 2019
No Score Yet The Walking Dead (1936) Horror pictures are a staple commodity, and this one was taken from one of the better shelves. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2016
75% Heroes for Sale (1933) Many a mystery is less bewildering than Heroes for Sale, which was not intended as a puzzler at all. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2014
93% You Can't Take It With You (1938) It's a grand picture. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 13, 2014
3.5/5 80% Here Comes the Navy (1934) A fast-moving comedy enriched by an authentic naval setting. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 31, 2012
76% Chu Chin Chow (1934) Britain's long-heralded invasion of the American film market has begun with the offerings at the Roxy of Chu Chin Chow, a tuneful, spectacular and robust adaptation of the Oscar Asche comic operetta. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 3, 2011
4/5 100% The Story of Louis Pasteur (1936) An excellent biography, just as it is a notable photoplay, dignified in subject, dramatic in treatment and brilliantly played by Paul Muni, Fritz Leiber, Josephine Hutchinson and many other members of the cast. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2011
100% Pinocchio (1940) It still is the best thing Mr. Disney has done and therefore the best cartoon ever made. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 10, 2008
3.5/5 No Score Yet Louise (1940) It is not at all likely that Louise will revolutionize either the operatic stage or the motion picture, but it is shorter than the opera, and the general public will find it a lot easier to sit through. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 15, 2007
93% Things to Come (1936) Things to Come is an unusual picture, a fantasy, if you will, with overtones of the Buck Rogers and Flash Gordon comic strips. But it is, as well, a picture with ideas which have been expressed dramatically and with visual fascination. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted May 31, 2007
3.5/5 80% Front Page Woman (1935) If you will keep in mind that this portrayal of newspaper work is a wee bit on the whimsy side, then Front Page Woman can be recommended as a downright amusing photoplay. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2007
98% The Bride of Frankenstein (1935) Another astonishing chapter in the career of the Monster. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2006
88% Wild Boys of the Road (Dangerous Days) (1933) Wild Boys of the Road... is disappointing, primarily because it might have been so much more than it is. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2006
67% The Invisible Ray (1936) As the story unreels, you realize that this is just another case of a man's manager bringing him along too fast. It is no wonder Karloff's mind cracks under the strain. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2006
79% The Devil-Doll (1936) Not since The Lost World, King Kong and The Invisible Man have the camera wizards enjoyed such a field day. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2006
3.5/5 80% Mark of the Vampire (1935) Like most good ghost stories, it's a lot of fun, even though you don't believe a word of it. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2006
80% The Raven (1935) If The Raven is the best that Universal can do with one of the greatest horror story writers of all time, then it had better toss away the other two books in its library and stick to the pulpies for plot material. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2006
2.5/5 71% Un grand amour de Beethoven (The Life and Loves of Beethoven) (1937) t upsets me just the same to see the musical cart hitched before the cinema horse and then be constrained to admit it was probably for the best. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 8, 2006
80% Tsuma yo bara no yo ni (Wife! Be Like a Rose!) (1935) It has a distressing habit of stumbling over the threshold of each new scene; its fadeouts and dissolves are awkwardly amateur. Yet it has a certain sturdy honesty in the resolution of its problem and the performances are expert. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2006
4.5/5 100% The Spy in Black (1939) U-Boat 29 is the most exciting spy melodrama since the advent of the Second World War. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
2/5 20% Anthony Adverse (1936) We found it a bulky, rambling and indecisive photoplay which has not merely taken liberties with the letter of the original but with its spirit. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
No Score Yet The Texans (1938) A moderately entertaining show. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
2.5/5 44% Bluebeard's Eighth Wife (1938) Although it's not a bad comedy by our current depressed standards, it has the dickens of a time trying to pass off Gary Cooper as a multi-marrying millionaire. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
4/5 100% Sabotage (1937) We won't tell you what happens. That would be to cheat Mr. Hitchcock of his just reward, but it is a warning what you may expect -- which, as is the way of all Hitchcock melodramas, is the unexpected. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
100% Craig's Wife (1936) The entire weight of the drama depends upon the malign effectiveness of its central character and Miss Russell, here enjoying her first real opportunity in Hollywood, gives a viciously eloquent performance. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
3.5/5 93% La Bête Humaine (Judas Was a Woman)(The Human Beast) (1938) It is simply a story; a macabre, grim and oddly-fascinating story. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
67% The Man They Could Not Hang (1939) If you don't know Mr. Karloff by this time, we will explain: He is the man whose funerals are never final. You lay a wreath on Boris in one corner and he is certain to appear in another, full of obscure, graveyard resentment. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
87% The Invisible Man Returns (1940) The Invisible Man Returns is a mite on the ghostly side, too, although neither so horrendous nor so humorous as the first one was. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
4/5 91% Come and Get It (1936) Although there is nothing new in the theme, it has been simply and powerfully expressed by a number of admirable performances, and it has been played against an interesting background. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
98% Modern Times (1936) Do you have to be reminded that Chaplin is a master of pantomime? Time has not changed his genius. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
4/5 100% After the Thin Man (1936) If After the Thin Man is not quite the delight The Thin Man was, it is, at the very least, one of the most urbane comedies of the season. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
3.5/5 No Score Yet That Certain Age (1938) Gentle but highly effective. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
90% The Story Of A Cheat (Le roman d'un tricheur) (1936) A witty, impudent, morally subversive show which every one should see for his own content and out of sheer curiosity about the kind of fellow who is not satisfied with writing, directing and starring in a picture, but must play seven [roles] as well. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
55% Dracula's Daughter (1936) A cute little horror picture. Be sure and bring the kiddies. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
3.5/5 100% Elephant Boy (1937) The film moves leisurely, but with rare charm and visual interest. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
57% Jamaica Inn (1939) Having set his own standards, Alfred Hitchcock must be judged by them; and, by them, his Jamaica Inn is merely journeyman melodrama. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
3/5 84% Another Thin Man (1939) We're still appreciative, but we found too many chestnuts in the dressing. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2006
2/5 78% La Marseillaise (1937) It is probably the least dramatic film ever made about one of the most dramatic events in history -- the French Revolution. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2006
4.5/5 96% Port of Shadows (Le quai des brumes) (1938) It's a thorough-going study in blacks and grays, without a free laugh in it; but it is also a remarkably beautiful motion picture from the purely pictorial standpoint and a strangely haunting drama. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2006
4/5 100% Young and Innocent (1938) Alfred Hitchcock, England's jovial and rotund master of melodrama, has turned out another crisply paced, excellently performed film. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2006