Graham Greene

Graham Greene
Graham Greene's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Spectator
Biography:
(Photo Credit: Mondadori Portfolio/Mondadori Portfolio/Getty Images)
Publications: The Spectator

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
95% Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939) It is a great film, even though it is not a great story, acted by a magnificent cast, so that Capra can afford to fling away on tiny parts men like Eugene Pallette, Guy Kibbee, Thomas Mitchell and Harry Carey. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
No Score Yet Each Dawn I Die (1939) The picture goes out in a blast of bombs and bullets: odd that it leaves so little impression behind. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
No Score Yet Never Say Die (1939) But the most enjoyable film for weeks has slipped by un- noticed among the heroic and romantic. Never Say Die is consistently absurd... - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
No Score Yet Kentucky (1938) Kentucky is the first film I have seen which has been made by its colour. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
No Score Yet The Dawn Patrol (1938) It is quite a good picture, well-directed and in some cases well-acted, but I don't believe it's true-a great deal of self- pity and romanticism have gone to the making of this excellent ham-sandwich. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
No Score Yet Idiot's Delight (1939) Over-acting could hardly go further... - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
No Score Yet 21 Days (1940) The brilliant acting of Mr. Hay Petrie as a decayed and outcast curate cannot conquer the overpowering flavour of cooked ham. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
90% The Stars Look Down (1940) Since this is the story of a mine disaster his work will inevitably be compared with Pabst's in Kameradschaft : he can bear the comparison. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
No Score Yet Black Eyes (1939) Baur, too, is a great enough actor to lend what might otherwise seem a somewhat grotesque situation genuine suspense... - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2019
No Score Yet Three Smart Girls Grow Up (1939) There is no doubt any longer of Miss Durbin's immense talents as an actress ; any undertones that there are in this amusing, astute and sentimental tale are supplied by her. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2019
No Score Yet East Meets West (1936) Avoid like the plague. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 14, 2019
No Score Yet Marchand D'Amour (1935) Directed with immense panache and a secret sense of amusement. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 14, 2019
62% The Great Ziegfeld (1936) Like a man sitting hour after hour on top of a pole, it does excite a kind of wonder; wonder at how it manages to go on. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 14, 2019
No Score Yet It's Love Again (1936) Mr. Victor Saville has directed It's Love Again with speed, efficiency, and a real sense of the absurd. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 14, 2019
No Score Yet Dark Rapture (Magie africaine) (1938) It is impossible to exaggerate the beauty of this film ; perhaps it is not a picture for anthropologists: the impressions it gives are rapid, general, uninstructed, aimed at the imagination rather than the intelligence - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 12, 2018
No Score Yet Dead Man's Shoes (1940) Very nearly worth seeing for the sake of two fine players who are too seldom seen on the English screen. Mr. Wilfred Lawson as the blackmailer with a commercial background... and Miss Nancy Price as the ex-criminal's mother. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 12, 2018
No Score Yet Thanks a Million (1935) Thanks a Million is a very amusing musical skit on American State elections. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2018
100% The Ghost Goes West (1935) The silly story, the gross misuse of Clair's peculiar qualities, were forgotten in my admiration for his camera sense. In no other film this year has there been the same feeling of mobility, of visual freedom. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2018
No Score Yet Personal Column (Pièges) (1939) Chevalier seems a little out of place as a rich impresario -- he can't help looking like a waiter or a chauffeur of immoderate charm, but there's Jean Renoir and a lovely new actress, Marie Dea, and al sorts of admirable minor parts. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2018
No Score Yet The Arsenal Stadium Mystery (1940) The explanation of the murder depends on another death outside the story and a coroner's report, and Mr. Dickinson's skill is never more evident than in his grim sad dramatisation of the dull typewritten pages. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2018
100% The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939) In its shocking way it's really very fine. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2018
95% Destry Rides Again (1939) A rather tired Western with a rather tired Dietrich. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2018
No Score Yet The Proud Valley (The Tunnel) (1940) The direc- tion of the quiet documentary scenes is good, but Mr. Pen Tennyson, who may have been handicapped by an undis- tinguished cast and a wobbly script, seems ill at ease with drama. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2018
No Score Yet Gold Is Where You Find It (1938) It's jam but good jam-with a few better moments you don't often find in films like this, and Mr. Claude Rains, as the farmers' leader, is chiefly responsible for these. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 6, 2018
No Score Yet Little Tough Guy (1938) Little Tough Guy is one of the best melodramas in recent years. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 6, 2018
No Score Yet Marked Girls (1938) No, it's not a major piece, but when M. Carco is safely off the screen scribbling his little books, we are excited again and again by the authenticity the French always put into their sets and characters. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2018
No Score Yet Hotel for Women (1939) Hotel for Women is a sentimental echo of The Women. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2018
100% The Roaring Twenties (1939) Mr. Cagney, of the bull-calf brow... is as always a superb and a witty actor. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2018
93% The Informer (1935) Victor MeLaglen has never given an abler performance, and the film, even if it sometimes underlines its points rather crudely, is a memorable picture of a pitiless war waged without honour on either side in doorways and cellars and gin shops. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2018
100% Anna Karenina (1935) It is Greta Garbo's personality which "makes" this film, which fills the mould of the neat respectful adaptation with some sense of the greatness in the novel. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2018
92% You Can't Take It With You (1938) It sounds awful, but it isn't as awful as all that, for Capra has a touch of genius with a camera: his screen always seems twice as big as other people's, and he cuts as brilliantly as Eisenstein. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2018
No Score Yet Crime and Punishment (1935) M. Chenal's camera takes its stand on the outside, the world's side. It would have been far better to have dropped the realistic approach altogether, to have battered the real theme into us with soliloquies, with aerial voices, with dream imagery. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2018
No Score Yet Charlie Chan at the Circus (1936) Charley Chan he needs no recommendation. The films in which he appears are all genuine detective films as distinct from thrillers, they are always well-made and well-acted. The new picture is particularly agreeable - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2018
No Score Yet Poppy (1936) The story doesn't really matter, for Mr. Fields has never acted better. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2018
82% Follow the Fleet (1936) It needs an effort of the mind to remember that Mr. Fred Astaire was not invented by a film director and drawn by a film draughtsman. He is the nearest we are ever likely to get to a human Mickey [Mouse]. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2018
No Score Yet Ignace (1937) The story seems to go quite smoothly. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2018
No Score Yet Girls' Dormitory (1936) Complications, of course, have still to be devised before the happy ending, for Mr. Marshall must be allowed to put on his characteristic act: dumb suffering. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
No Score Yet Life on the Hortobagy (1940) [Life on the Hortobagy] is one of the most satisfying films I have seen; it belongs to the order of Dovjenko's Earth without the taint of propaganda. The photography is extraordinarily beautiful, the cutting superb. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
No Score Yet Go West, Young Man (1936) The wisecracks lack the old impudence, and seldom have so many feet of film been expended on a mere dirty look. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
No Score Yet French Without Tears (1939) French Without Tears is a triumph for Mr. Anthony Asquith. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
80% Dangerous (1935) Dangerous, then, is unusual, but only because of Miss Davis. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
No Score Yet Dela i lyudi (Men and Jobs) (1932) A picture with an original subject, excitingly directed, quite free from political propaganda, with a quality of humanity, simplicity and good-humour rare on the screen. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
No Score Yet Last Rose (Martha) (1936) The tra-la-la melodies, the hearty Teutonic merry-making, and the determined prettiness of the photography are tedious, not the less tedious for being German. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
No Score Yet All the King's Horses (1935) It is sad to see Miss Mary Ellis's sensuous appeal, her Bacchanalian gleam, wasted on sentiment so sweet and daring, so embarrassingly domestic. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
80% Big Brown Eyes (1936) A fast well-directed and quite unsentimental gangster film, pleasantly free from emotion -- for emotion on the screen is nearly always false emotion. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 14, 2018
No Score Yet Nurse Edith Cavell (1939) As slow and ponderous and well protected as a steam-roller, [Director Herbert Wilcox] irons out opposition. We get from his films almost everything except life, character, truth. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 14, 2018
No Score Yet False Faces (1932) False Faces is distinguished only by a grim little incident in a surgery. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 14, 2018
No Score Yet Star of Midnight (1935) A light, quick, sophisticated comedy. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 14, 2018
No Score Yet The Real Glory (1939) Cooper as the military doctor, who arrives with a present of orchids and a colonel's gallstone for his friends, has never acted better. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 14, 2018
No Score Yet Living on Velvet (1935) The picture would be nothing without Miss Francis and it doesn't amount to much with her. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 9, 2018