Graham Greene Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Graham Greene

Graham Greene
Graham Greene's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Spectator

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet Marked Girls (1938) No, it's not a major piece, but when M. Carco is safely off the screen scribbling his little books, we are excited again and again by the authenticity the French always put into their sets and characters.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2018
No Score Yet Hotel for Women (1939) Hotel for Women is a sentimental echo of The Women.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2018
100% The Roaring Twenties (1939) Mr. Cagney, of the bull-calf brow... is as always a superb and a witty actor.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2018
92% The Informer (1935) Victor MeLaglen has never given an abler performance, and the film, even if it sometimes underlines its points rather crudely, is a memorable picture of a pitiless war waged without honour on either side in doorways and cellars and gin shops.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2018
100% Anna Karenina (1935) It is Greta Garbo's personality which "makes" this film, which fills the mould of the neat respectful adaptation with some sense of the greatness in the novel.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2018
91% You Can't Take It With You (1938) It sounds awful, but it isn't as awful as all that, for Capra has a touch of genius with a camera: his screen always seems twice as big as other people's, and he cuts as brilliantly as Eisenstein.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2018
No Score Yet Crime and Punishment (1935) M. Chenal's camera takes its stand on the outside, the world's side. It would have been far better to have dropped the realistic approach altogether, to have battered the real theme into us with soliloquies, with aerial voices, with dream imagery.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2018
No Score Yet Charlie Chan at the Circus (1936) Charley Chan he needs no recommendation. The films in which he appears are all genuine detective films as distinct from thrillers, they are always well-made and well-acted. The new picture is particularly agreeable‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2018
No Score Yet Poppy (1936) The story doesn't really matter, for Mr. Fields has never acted better.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2018
80% Follow the Fleet (1936) It needs an effort of the mind to remember that Mr. Fred Astaire was not invented by a film director and drawn by a film draughtsman. He is the nearest we are ever likely to get to a human Mickey [Mouse].‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2018
No Score Yet Ignace (1937) The story seems to go quite smoothly.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2018
No Score Yet Girls' Dormitory (1936) Complications, of course, have still to be devised before the happy ending, for Mr. Marshall must be allowed to put on his characteristic act: dumb suffering.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
No Score Yet Life on the Hortobagy (1940) [Life on the Hortobagy] is one of the most satisfying films I have seen; it belongs to the order of Dovjenko's Earth without the taint of propaganda. The photography is extraordinarily beautiful, the cutting superb.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
No Score Yet Go West, Young Man (1936) The wisecracks lack the old impudence, and seldom have so many feet of film been expended on a mere dirty look.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
No Score Yet French Without Tears (1939) French Without Tears is a triumph for Mr. Anthony Asquith.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
No Score Yet Dangerous (1935) Dangerous, then, is unusual, but only because of Miss Davis.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
No Score Yet Dela i lyudi (Men and Jobs) (1932) A picture with an original subject, excitingly directed, quite free from political propaganda, with a quality of humanity, simplicity and good-humour rare on the screen.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
No Score Yet Last Rose (Martha) (1936) The tra-la-la melodies, the hearty Teutonic merry-making, and the determined prettiness of the photography are tedious, not the less tedious for being German.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
No Score Yet All the King's Horses (1935) It is sad to see Miss Mary Ellis's sensuous appeal, her Bacchanalian gleam, wasted on sentiment so sweet and daring, so embarrassingly domestic.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
80% Big Brown Eyes (1936) A fast well-directed and quite unsentimental gangster film, pleasantly free from emotion -- for emotion on the screen is nearly always false emotion.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 14, 2018
No Score Yet Nurse Edith Cavell (1939) As slow and ponderous and well protected as a steam-roller, [Director Herbert Wilcox] irons out opposition. We get from his films almost everything except life, character, truth.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 14, 2018
No Score Yet False Faces (1932) False Faces is distinguished only by a grim little incident in a surgery.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 14, 2018
No Score Yet Star of Midnight (1935) A light, quick, sophisticated comedy.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 14, 2018
No Score Yet The Real Glory (1939) Cooper as the military doctor, who arrives with a present of orchids and a colonel's gallstone for his friends, has never acted better.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 14, 2018
No Score Yet Living on Velvet (1935) The picture would be nothing without Miss Francis and it doesn't amount to much with her.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 9, 2018
No Score Yet Our Neighbors - The Carters (1939) No family like this has ever existed.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 9, 2018
No Score Yet Private Worlds (1935) The theme of "private worlds," which should have made us disturbingly aware of the small difference between the fantasies of doctor and patient, is lost in a conventional love story.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 9, 2018
No Score Yet Rome Express (1932) The film came to an abrupt untidy end, but Mr. Conrad Veidt and Mr. Donald Caitlin brought to the screen a devilish ruthlessness and a mean cowardice which even the trivial plot about a stolen picture couldn't cramp.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 9, 2018
No Score Yet Juarez (1939) It must be admitted, however, that a quite impressive film has emerged from all the muddle.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 9, 2018
No Score Yet Espionage Agent (1939) The whole job seems to have been done very easily.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 9, 2018
No Score Yet First Love (1939) There is nothing at all to resent in the picture; it is admirably directed, amusingly written, and acted with immense virtuosity by a fine cast.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 9, 2018
91% The Hound of the Baskervilles (1939) The cinema has never yet done justice to Sherlock Holmes.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
No Score Yet Man of Conquest (1939) It is the kind of big idealistic middlebrow epic that America does very well.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
No Score Yet As You Like It (1936) Regarded as a film, As You Like It is less satisfactory. There are far too many dull middle-length shots from a fixed camera, so that we might just as well be seated in the circle above the deep wide stage at Drury Lane. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
95% Wuthering Heights (1939) A lot of reverence has gone into a picture which should have been as coarse as a sewer.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
93% La Bête Humaine (Judas Was a Woman)(The Human Beast) (1938) Gabin gives an impeccable performance.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
100% The Story of Louis Pasteur (1936) An honest, interesting and well-made picture.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
100% Fury (1936) Fury, the story of how a mob in a small southern town lynches an innocent man who has been arrested under suspicion of kidnapping, is astonishing, the only film I know to which I have wanted to attach the epithet of "great."‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
No Score Yet Union Pacific (1939) This latest de Mille epic contains all the Excelsior qualities we expect in his work but it is never as funny as The Crusades and he has lost his touch with crowds, the stamp of a broad, popular genius who used to remind us a little of Frith.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
No Score Yet A Chump at Oxford (1940) Laurel and Hardy are together again -- this is better news than anything the papers print. A Chump at Oxford ranks with their best pictures.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
No Score Yet On Your Toes (1939) The dialogue has wit: Zorina, who played the prima ballerina in London, acts well, looks lovely, and dances beautifully, and the photography of the ballet sequence is really magnificent.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
97% Ninotchka (1939) This is not merely a Garbo film, it is a Lubitsch film, and the result is enchanting.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
No Score Yet The Guv'nor (Mister Hobo) (1935) I am not an admirer of Mr. Arliss, but I found this film rather more tolerable than his recent appearances as the family Wellington, the family Voltaire.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
100% Treasure Island (1934) Even a child can recognise the greater dignity and depth of this Scottish presbyterian's Mansoul written in terms of an adventure story for a boys' magazine.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
No Score Yet Midshipman Easy (1935) Midshipman Easy can be unreservedly recommended to children. It is the first film of a new English director, Mr. Carol Reed, who has more sense of the cinema than most veteran British directors.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 8, 2018
No Score Yet Dust Be My Destiny (1939) A faint echo of Muni's great chain-gang film.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 30, 2014
71% The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle (1939) Perhaps the best the marvelous couple have made since Gay Divorce.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Dec 7, 2011
No Score Yet Fifth Avenue Girl (1939) Fifth Avenue Girl has Ginger Rogers in it, and Walter Connolly, so it's worth seeing.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Dec 7, 2011
99% The Wizard of Oz (1939) The whole picture is incredibly lavish, and there's a lot of pleasure to be got these days from watching money spent on other things than war.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2004
100% The Baker's Wife (La Femme du boulanger) (1938) It is a long film with a small subject, but the treatment is so authentic that it seems over far too soon, and the acting is superb.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2003