Helen Brown Norden

Helen Brown Norden
Helen Brown Norden's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Vanity Fair
Publications: Vanity Fair

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
No Score Yet The Melody Lingers On (1935) [It has] what should be an excellent cast -- Helen Westley, Laura Hope Crewes, William Harrigan, John Halliday and Mona Barrie, in addition to Miss Hutchinson -- but they don't seem lo he able to do much, as they are always falling over the plot. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet The Three Musketeers (1935) To us oldsters, with the memory of Douglas Fairbanks, the elder, ever green in our hearts, Abel's performance is a little too impetuously boyish... In fact, none of the cast was quite glamorous or gallant enough for me. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet Under the Pampas Moon (1935) There are two exciting horse races, one very good song, and a marvelously comic performance by Soledad Jimenez. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet Enter Madame (1935) [Enter Madame] forces upon me the regrettable conclusion that Miss Landi is not, and probably never has been, a very good actress. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet Bachelor of Arts (1935) An incredible little offering which shows you life as it certainly never could be in a co-educational university. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet She Was a Lady (1934) The story for this one was taken from the novel of the same name by Elisabeth Cobb, Irvin S. Cobb's daughter. I don't know how good the original was, but the plot is certainly a phoney. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
No Score Yet Nell Gwyn (1935) It seems to me that [Anna Neagle] has caught the spirit of the role and carried it off with honors. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
No Score Yet Sisters Under the Skin (1934) Why they ever cast Elissa Landi as a Broadway fly-girl --and let her British accent struggle with 42nd Street slang -- is another of those fascinating Hollywood daily mysteries. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
No Score Yet All Men Are Enemies (1934) Now [Fox has] had the courage to translate Richard Aldington's fine novel, All Men Are Enemies, to the screen. They have not been so successful with this one, but we must still admire their spirit. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
No Score Yet The Crime Doctor (1934) The crime may be perfect, but the picture is not. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
No Score Yet Wild Cargo (1934) After the first ten water buffalo, they all begin to look alike. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
No Score Yet Sorrell and Son (1934) Warner has dignity to his finger tips, even when he is scrubbing floors and rustling trunks up and down stairs -- a gentleman of the old school, by Gad, sir -- and it is nice to see him again. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
No Score Yet Novyy Gulliver (The New Gulliver) (1935) The Russian puppet picture, [The New Gulliver], with 3,000 puppets in the cast, is the most amazing thing you've ever seen. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Anne of Green Gables (1934) Much to my surprise, the picture, saccharine with sentiment though it is, is not really so hard to take after all. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet The Private Life of Don Juan (1934) The result is an entertaining and credible picture. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet The President Vanishes (1934) The picture ends with an incredible solution, but not until you have sat through some of the most exciting reels the cinema realm has to offer. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet The Last Gentleman (1934) The picture has one really hilarious and unexpected bit of farce [which] stands as a great relief to the rest of the film, which is pretty much a stock affair. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet The Pursuit of Happiness (1935) The picture has been intelligently directed; it is quite consistently entertaining; and it has, as I have said, the ingratiating Mr. Lederer in a part well tailored to his talents, including his gift for comedy. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Caravan (1934) [Director Erik Charell's] handling of mass scenes is superb. There is not a moment of heaviness in them. Everything moves in a rhythmic line; and there are moments of surprising charm and beauty. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Krestyane (Peasants) (1935) The film is the most stirring, from a dramatic point of view, of any of the recent Soviet ones, and it is brilliantly acted, with great vitality and a moving power. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
100% Anna Karenina (1935) There seems more of anguish and more of sombre depth in this version than there was in the old silent film (with Garbo and John Gilbert). Garbo acts with a dignity and a bitter passion. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet The Dark Angel (1935) The picture has been Avell directed and photographed, and it is really much more effective and moving than this synopsis might indicate. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
100% Top Hat (1935) While personally I didn't think it was quite so swell as The Gay Divorcee or Roberta, it is still about ten times better than am musical that hasn't got Fred Astaire in it. The man is a maniac when he starts to dance. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet I Live My Life (1935) I liked the last Joan Crawford picture, Live My Life, more than any other which she has made in a long time. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Rendezvous (1935) I couldn't understand the plot very well, but it runs on entertainingly, with Mr. Powell playing his customary role of Mr. Powell. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Transatlantic Tunnel (1935) Only occasionally a vehicle of mild excitement. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Hands Across the Table (1935) I had a swell time at it. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Curly Top (1935) [Temple] has great charm and a phenomenal ease which permit her to dominate even such an absurd situation and stupid dialogue as are forced on her in her latest picture, Curly Top. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet La Maternelle (Children of Montmartre) (1933) No brief resume of the plot can convey the great emotional power and fascination of the picture. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Becky Sharp (1935) With the exception of Miriam Hopkins in the title role, the acting in Becky Sharp is almost violently negligible. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Sanders of the River (1935) Korda spent five months in Africa on location, and some of the scenes are remarkable. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
96% The 39 Steps (1935) The newest Gaumont British importation, The 39 Steps, should prove pretty conclusively that Alfred Hitchcock is the finest native director in England. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Love Me Forever (1935) With her own personality and her voice, [Grace Moore] carries the picture off triumphantly, but there is no reason why in the future she shouldn't be provided with a fairly intelligent and more adult script. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet In Caliente (1935) An average musical, made definitely superior for one brief moment by the presence of that peerless dance team, the De Marcos. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Call of the Wild (1935) I don't know whether or not Darryl Zanuck meant it that way, but Twentieth Century's production of The Call of the Wild is certainly a comedy. At any rate, Jack London must be whirling in his grave. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Escape Me Never (1935) It is due to the bright magic of Elisabeth Bergner that the film assumes importance. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
92% The Informer (1935) Certainly it is the best movie of the year so far, and it is doubtful if any subsequent one will be able to surpass it. I am inclined to believe, moreover, that it is the finest thing which the American movies have ever produced. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet La Cucaracha (1934) The short itself is negligible in story and acting. But as a radical step forward in the use of color in the cinema, it is a distinguished and exciting achievement. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet She Loves Me Not (1934) It's sure-fire and can't miss. The picture moves quickly; the acting is uniformly good; the lines and situations hilarious; and the slightly insane spirit of the original play has been retained. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
57% Viva Villa! (1934) There is also no denying the fact that Wallace Beery is not everybody's Villa. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Convention City (1933) Consistently bawdy, frequently accurate, it represents the new film era of farce license. It has some hilarious moments and some surprisingly outspoken ones; its basic attitude is one of flippant and rowdy veracity. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2019
60% Alice in Wonderland (1933) It was hoped that the picture would have a large appeal for children, but the consensus of opinion seems to have been that even the Little Ones had rather see Jean Harlow any day, or else stay home in the nursery and play Tick-Tack-Toe. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2019
83% Flying Down to Rio (1933) Chiefly noteworthy for the presence of the excessively nimble and limp-jointed Fred Astaire, Flying Down to Rio is, by and large, a laborious musical film, in which the one funny line is lifted bodily from a current dirty joke. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2019
No Score Yet Roman Scandals (1933) Cantor's last film, The Kid from Spain, netted him a personal stipend of $260,000. Roman Scandals will probably make more for him, as it is brighter, gayer, livelier. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2019
No Score Yet Gallant Lady (1933) It would he a real treat, just once, to see [Ann Harding] cast as a low woman with dastardly motives and the courage of a titmouse. Instead, however, she remains... brave in the face of vicissitude and always the lady. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2019
71% Man's Castle (1933) Bathetic and fantastic as the story may seem, it finds redemption in Mr. Borzage's at times inspired direction and in the genuinely fine and understanding performances of Spencer Tracy, as Bill, and Loretta Young, as Trina. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2019
No Score Yet Crime Without Passion (1934) Crime Without Passion is beautiful and exciting photography -- animated throughout by a direction which shows an intense flair for dramatic value, a definitely superior intelligence. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2019
No Score Yet Rumba (1935) George Raft's best film since he gave up gangster roles, and one which proves that he's still got the old hypnotism right on tap. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 7, 2019
No Score Yet Folies Bergère de Paris, (The Man from the Folies Bergere) (1935) ... it still gives Chevalier a better chance to demonstrate that really magnificent charm of his which has hitherto been so stupidly suppressed and dulled by his Hollywood management. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 7, 2019
No Score Yet Chapayev (Chapaev) (1935) The film is the best which has come out of the U.S.S.R. since The Road to Life-dramatic, sincere and lightened by flashes of lively humor. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 7, 2019