Ian Buruma Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Ian Buruma

Ian Buruma
Ian Buruma's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The New York Review of Books

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
94% Tokyo Sonata (Tokyo Sonata) (2009) Kurosawa's film tells us a great deal about contemporary Japan without being overtly political.‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 29, 2018
78% Standard Operating Procedure (2008) Both Morris's film and the book based on it by Gourevitch are devastating, even without going into detail about the complicity, or indeed responsibility, of top officials in the Bush administration.‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 29, 2018
93% Berlin Alexanderplatz (1980) Highly stylized, it manages to combine theatricality with intimacy, which perfectly suits the tone of Döblin's narrative.‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 23, 2018
90% Rescue Dawn (2007) Somehow his story, reenacted in the feature film, fails to catch fire in the way it does in the documentary. It looks oddly conventional, even flat.‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 23, 2018
91% Letters from Iwo Jima (2006) You realize how very young many of these men were, and how ill-suited to be turned into killing machines.‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 23, 2018
73% Flags of Our Fathers (2006) Eastwood does manage to provide a hint (and a hint is all that is feasible) of the way war affects an ordinary soldier: the terror, the cruelty, but also the moments of selflessness, even grace.‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 23, 2018
92% Mrs. Brown (1997) There is something missing in the film. It is flat.‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2018
95% The Remains of the Day (1993) The movie looks splendid. Arcadian views and honeyed filters have been largely resisted. But the content, that is to say, the script, has problems.‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2018
100% Ghare-Baire (The Home and the World) (1984) A masterpiece compared to most movies in India, or anywhere else...‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 13, 2018
88% Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters (1985) If one cannot seriously address the sexuality of a man who was so obviously obsessed and driven by sex, then why bother making a film of his life at all?‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Jun 18, 2018
82% Like Someone in Love (2013) Tokyo, the ultimate modern metropolis, with its neon-lit commercial graffiti and buildings that look like a pastiche of everywhere and nowhere, is perfect for Kiarostami's story of closeness between strangers.‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2017
90% Beyond The Hills (2013) In lesser hands than Mungiu's, the film might have become a simple indictment of religious orthodoxy. . . The story told by [Director Cristian] Mungiu, one of the best contemporary directors in Europe, is more complicated, and interesting.‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2017
94% Diplomacy (2014) The best way to look at his film is as a love story about Paris. One can differ about the interpretation of events presented in the movie. It is hard to disagree about the worthiness of his love.‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2017
61% Generation War (2014) Apart from the bizarre coincidences (how often can five friends cross paths on a battlefield stretching all the way from Poland to the northeast of the Ukraine?), Generation War has other typical marks of TV melodrama.‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2017
92% Mountains May Depart (Shan he gu ren) (2016) [Director Jia Zhangke] has an instinctive feel for China's shifting rural and urban landscape. . . He is superb at catching the changing moods of his country in poetic, frequently wordless, and often absurd images. ‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2017
83% Denial (2016) The weakness of the film lies in the two protagonists, despite some brilliant acting.‐ The New York Review of Books
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2017