Janet MaslinMovie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Janet Maslin

Janet Maslin
Janet Maslin's reviews (from any publication) always count toward the Tomatometer because this critic is a Tomatometer-approved critic.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3/5 55% So I Married an Axe Murderer (1993) The look of So I Married an Axe Murderer is crisply professional, and John Graysmark's production design provides an element of visual surprise.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3/5 40% Herbie Goes Bananas (1980) A cheerful, four-cylinder children's movie, though its car jokes aren't good for much mileage.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
2/5 11% Parasite (1982) This is a badly acted B movie without much flair for involving its audience.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
73% Rok Spokojnego Slonca (The Year of the Quiet Sun) (1984) As a story of postwar grief and rehabilitation, A Year of the Quiet Sun is well-detailed and carefully told, if also somewhat paralyzed by its heroine's inertia. It is given somewhat more momentum by the performances.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
2/5 85% The Blues Brothers (1980) This essentially modest movie is reported to have cost about $30 million, and what did all that money buy? Scores of car crashes. Too many extras. Overstaged dance numbers. And a hollowness that certainly didn't come cheap.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3/5 68% The Long Kiss Goodnight (1996) Mr. Black's screenplay is mean-spirited, but it earns its keep with sharp, sarcastic dialogue and ingenious ways of setting up this story.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
0% The Allnighter (1987) Mrs. Hoffs should not make jokes about film making.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
2/5 31% Making Love (1982) Once the cat is out of the bag, the movie turns rip-roaring awful in an entirely enjoyable way.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
100% The Decline of Western Civilization (1981) The Decline of Western Civilization' is a shrewd and engrossing documentary even for audiences who have absolutely no patience for the music it includes. ‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
0% Hot to Trot (1988) Although Michael Dinner's direction is noticeably better than the material, the film aims consistently for the lowest common denominator.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3/5 33% The Wraith (1986) Mr. Cassavetes is effectively black-hearted, and makes a striking figure, and Randy Quaid does a lot with the underdeveloped role of a local sheriff.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3.5/5 31% Halloween II (1981) Halloween II is good enough to deserve a sequel of its own.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
67% Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990) Speaks to the gleeful hell-raising monster in each of us, and it speaks with much more verve, cleverness and good humor than the film on which it is based. Add this to the very short list of sequels that neatly surpass their predecessors.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
25% Endless Love (1981) Anyone unfamiliar with the story of Scott Spencer's novel is bound to be mystified by Franco Zeffirelli's latest film, which reduces Endless Love to a whimperingly latter-day Romeo and Juliet with a little pyromania thrown in.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
4/5 79% Sophie's Choice (1982) Though it's far from a flawless movie, Sophie's Choice is a unified and deeply affecting one. Thanks in large part to Miss Streep's bravura performance, it's a film that casts a powerful, uninterrupted spell.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3/5 69% The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992) There's no great show of wit or tunefulness here, and the ingenious cross-generational touches are fairly rare. But there is a lively kiddie version of the Dickens tale, one that very young viewers ought to understand.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
71% The Hot Spot (1990) For all its genre touches, ''The Hot Spot'' is best remembered for its little eccentricities. ‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3.5/5 79% The Funeral (1996) [Ferrara] still finds sharp new ways to explore the nuances of a trite-sounding story.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3/5 86% Stripes (1981) Mr. Murray hasn't yet reached the point at which his routines can be sustained for more than 10 minutes at a time. But he has achieved a sardonically exaggerated calm that can be very entertaining.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3/5 87% First Blood (1982) First Blood is ragged and flashy; it ought to be a big success with audiences that value action for its own sake.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
2/5 86% The Stepfather (1987) Too often disappointingly thin.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3/5 32% Sgt. Bilko (1996) The film is full of gratifying gags like these, but it also has to strain for newly enlarged scope.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
86% Dragonslayer (1981) Mr. Robbins's overall accomplishment is one of creating a mood, and he does this well enough to make up for the film's occasional cumbersomeness.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3/5 21% City Heat (1984) One of Mr. Benjamin's main contributions to the film is a good-humored buoyancy, even when things are at their most muddled.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3/5 100% Dao ma zei (The Horse Thief) (1986) The film's tribal drama of theft, ostracism and terrible retribution unfolds, although the director, Tian Zhuangzhuang (an iconoclastic graduate of the Beijing Film Academy), uses few conventional means of bringing these dramatic events to the forefront.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
2/5 55% Mommie Dearest (1981) There is nothing to string the episodes together into a coherent drama, and no insight into Miss Crawford herself.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3/5 78% Fast Times At Ridgemont High (1982) A jumbled but appealing teen-age comedy with something of a fresh perspective on the subject.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
70% The Land Before Time (1988) Most of ''The Land Before Time'' is so authentically geared to the thinking of children that it should charm adults as well.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
4/5 89% The Man in the Moon (1991) Gets an outstandingly natural performance out of Miss Witherspoon, who has no trouble carrying a lot of the film single-handedly. It falls to her to remind the audience that this story is at heart about a family, and she does.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
4/4 96% The Long Good Friday (1982) Though its plot contains much that's new, The Long Good Friday is a swift, sharp-edged gangster story in a classic mold.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3.5/5 75% Max Dugan Returns (1983) There are certainly some questionable ingredients to the story, but you're not likely to notice them while the film is under way. You're likely to be laughing.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3/5 50% Best Friends (1982) Even when Best Friends isn't working uproariously as a comedy, there's an element of original, offbeat humor that keeps it promising.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3.5/4 72% Nighthawks (1981) All of it is standard stuff, and yet Nighthawks has been assembled with enough pep to make it feel fresh.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
1/5 8% Can't Stop the Music (1980) The unevenness of the acting comes as a kind of blessing, though, since the rest of the movie is so thoroughly homogenized.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
2.5/5 78% Mephisto (1981) Mephisto seems somewhat remote, without all the urgency of which Mr. Szabo has shown himself capable.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
63% The Last Unicorn (1982) A story filled with genuine sweetness and mystery.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
20% Windy City (1984) The romance is entirely pat; as for the old-gang-of-mine gatherings, when Danny compares them to a beer commercial, he's not far off the mark.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
36% A View to a Kill (1985) As lavishly escapist as they are, the latest James Bond films have become strenuous to watch, now that the business of maintaining Bond's casual savoir-faire looks like such a monumental chore. ‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
2.5/5 17% Five Days One Summer (1983) This isn't a movie anyone would mind, but it isn't one anyone would feel terribly touched by, either.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
2.5/5 11% Jaws 3 (1983) It's harmless but unsurprising.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3.5/5 70% The Goonies (1985) The Goonies has every imaginable funhouse flourish. It has crooks, bats, cobwebs, skeletons, a lovable monster, an underground grotto and a treasure hidden by some of the most considerate, clue-loving pirates who ever lived.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
35% The Woman in Red (1984) Fortunately, most of the film is more appealing than its premise.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3.5/5 78% Videodrome (1983) Though Videodrome finally grows grotesque and a little confused, it begins very well and sustains its cleverness for a long while.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
2.5/5 60% The Serpent and the Rainbow (1987) The Serpent and the Rainbow has a screenplay that often breaks its spell.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
4/4 100% Searching for Bobby Fischer (1993) What Bobby Fischer took away, dashing the hopes and the innocence of his acolytes when he spurned chess, may never truly be recaptured. But some of it has found its way to the screen.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
86% Altered States (1980) Dependably -- even exhilaratingly -- bizarre. Its strangeness, which borders cheerfully on the ridiculous, is its most enjoyable feature.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
89% Bad Boys (1982) It eventually becomes nothing but ugly and sustains that quality to the bitter end.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
2/5 30% The Formula (1980) The murder scene is littered with so many red herrings it might as well be a delicatessen.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
29% The Adventures of Ford Fairlane (1990) The person most likely to be entertained by ''The Adventures of Ford Fairlane'' need not be made aware of the film's existence. He's already on the screen.‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004
3.5/5 92% In the Soup (1992) A droll, self-conscious fable with an unexpected heart of gold ...‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 30, 2004