Jasper Rees Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Jasper Rees

Jasper Rees
Jasper Rees's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Daily Telegraph (UK), The Spectator, The Arts Desk

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
4/5 88% The Post (2018) This welcome paean to print is glorious broadsheet filmmaking.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Jan 18, 2018
3/5 50% Downsizing (2017) Oddly for a film about the ecological benefits of keeping things small, Downsizing suffers from a curious case of bloat.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Jan 18, 2018
5/5 93% Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017) The performances, from start to finish, shimmer with conviction.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Jan 11, 2018
69% Crooked House (2017) The outcome of the whodunnit is known to those who know, but for all the many red herrings and MacGuffins, a smattering of hints were dropped that the clever culprit would emerge from the left field.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Dec 21, 2017
3/5 78% Voyeur (2017) The film is a bit of self-referential jumble which works best as a thinkpiece about the Faustian deal between writer and subject. ‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2017
68% Happy End (2017) The title is less a spoiler than a wish. Huppert and Trintignant, as ever, perform commandingly. Fantine Harduin is exceptional as the young Eve. None can quite stir the heart in this morose critique of a fractured society.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2017
3/5 61% Samba (2015) Based on a novel by Delphine Coulin, this is an affectionate and touching look at the absurdities of life as an illegal, and at its heart are two charming performances.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2017
4/5 86% Battle of the Sexes (2017) If you accept that you're being sold a simplified snapshot, Battle of the Sexes is a lot of fun.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2017
2/5 26% Terminator Genisys (2015) I started to lose the plot, plus the will to go on, about five minutes in, and that's before the serious head-scratching stuff about multiple time-frames and meta-reflexive parallel narratives mulched up in the vortex of the space-tedium continuum.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
3/5 76% 13 Minutes (Elser) (2017) The bottom line about Elser's story -- and this perhaps explains why he remains an obscurity -- is that it petered out. After starting with a bang, so does 13 Minutes.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
4/5 91% Marshland (La isla mínima) (2014) It hits most of the right notes as a conventional crime thriller featuring the usual ne'er-do-wells... What deepens it into something more involving is the combination of time and place.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
3/5 61% Legend (2015) Legend is indecently entertaining, but as an East End western it doesn't have a thought in its head other than to forgive the Krays for all their sins.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
3/5 80% Macbeth (2015) Kurzel has delivered a lean and sparse adaptation, heavily trimmed and light on psychological depth. As a cinematic spectacle it is stunning. As a study of the play, it lacks that essential Macbethian ingredient: ambition.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2017
4/5 72% The Decent One (2014) There is little unknown about Himmler's pivotal part in genocide. The film's power is in its access to the private workings of psychotic power-mongering, ideological hatred and pious self-pity.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2017
78% The Killing of a Sacred Deer (2017) What makes this operatic fable sing is the extraordinarily chilling performance of Barry Keoghan as Martin. His pinched, pouchy face, with its icicle eyes and lubricious lips, looks like a viral scourge sent to trash the American dream.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Nov 2, 2017
2/5 7% The Snowman (2017) It looks as if writers kept being drafted in to fix stuff, but found themselves tasked with cramming a square peg through a round hole. A lot of it doesn't make sense.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Oct 12, 2017
64% Goodbye Christopher Robin (2017) It's an affecting story, competently visualised by director Simon Curtis... And yet there's a gnawing credibility gap; the facts feel mangled implausibly out of shape to serve the narrative's needs.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
3/5 74% The Limehouse Golem (2017) Though the pieces of The Limehouse Golem don't quite fit together, Jane Goldman's proto-feminist script saves the best with a splendidly clever twist that rewards your patience.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2017
4/5 87% American Made (2017) Cruise has more fun than he's had in years twitting his image as an ethical action hero.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Aug 24, 2017
4/5 98% The Big Sick (2017) The Big Sick is an enchanting film with a terrible title. Don't be put off by it.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2017
4/5 92% Dunkirk (2017) Anyone hoping to be guided through all this morass of detonations and drownings by the handrail of dialogue, the nuance and shade of human drama, will have to go whistle. Dunkirk is not about characters but character.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Jul 21, 2017
4/5 85% Okja (2017) In short, Okja is a wrong-footing mash-up that delivers a sharp jolt to the meat-eater's conscience.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2017
3/5 49% Churchill (2017) It's perfectly entertaining, but this Winston has had smallness thrust upon him.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2017
3/5 92% The Shepherd (El pastor) (2016) This is a quietly stirring film with its heart in the right place, and a finale that delivers. Miguel Martín is never less than watchable as the taciturn, oblivious presence on the fringes of a sinister, squabbling melodrama.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Jun 9, 2017
2/5 29% King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword (2017) King Arthur is basically Lock, Stock and One Stonking Sword, in which Ritchie filters national myth through the only aesthetic he knows: the stop-start gor-blimey rock video in which everyone channels their inner Winstone.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted May 19, 2017
4/5 75% Miss Sloane (2016) This Miss deserves to be a hit.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted May 12, 2017
5/5 100% King Charles III on Masterpiece (2017) Perhaps this majestic, unmissable drama will send new audiences back to the source for meaningful encounters with Lear, Lady M, Brutus, Prince Hal and other forebears.‐ Daily Telegraph (UK)
Read More | Posted May 11, 2017
93% The Levelling (2017) Such films must be made. Otherwise ambitious, original young British filmmakers won't get a start and the only stories to make it to the screen will be the same old ones about aliens and boxers.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 11, 2017
3/5 91% Mindhorn (2016) It won't win many awards or break many box office records, but Mindhorn doesn't outstay its welcome and approaches the important business of spoofery with a practically academic attention to ridiculous detail. A hoot.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted May 5, 2017
1/5 20% The Hatton Garden Job (2017) Thompson has managed to lure a cast who can relied upon to say the lines and not bump into the furniture, but his script somehow contrives to stumble into every British gangster cliché while syringing the last ounce of life out of every scene.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Apr 14, 2017
3/5 87% The Lost City of Z (2017) The Lost City of Z doesn't quite unearth a transporting truth about Percy Fawcett.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2017
4/5 75% Kong: Skull Island (2017) There is plenty of infantilising fun to be had.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Mar 7, 2017
71% Viceroy's House (2017) [It's] a perfectly decent primer, and it's high time this geopolitical powderkeg had its resonant moment in the multiplex. But a bit like India and the putative Pakistan, it doesn't quite know if its many moving parts all belong under the same roof.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
3/5 81% Patriots Day (2017) Berg licks the story along at an efficient pace, imparts a powerful sense of a city under siege in the overhead camerawork, and wrings tears in a final reveal involving the actual participants. Dramatically, though... not quite enough is at stake.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Feb 24, 2017
2/5 35% The Great Wall (2017) An all-clanking schlockbuster.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Feb 17, 2017
5/5 95% Manchester by the Sea (2016) For all Lonergan's storytelling skills, Manchester by the Sea stands or falls on its central performance. Casey Affleck, outstandingly skilful at keeping his cards close to his chest, packs immense power into a study of incurable grief and guilt.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Jan 13, 2017
81% Chi-Raq (2015) Lee has much fun toying with the fixtures and fittings of the source material.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2016
2/5 76% A Street Cat Named Bob (2016) Treadaway is always watchable, and turns out to be quite a good busker. Bob portrays himself with commitment and conviction. But you get most of what you need to know in the trailer of the curious incident of the cat in the day-time.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Nov 2, 2016
2/5 22% Inferno (2016) On the plus side there's no putting up with Brown's infernal prose.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2016
2/5 69% Swiss Army Man (2016) There's plenty of energy on offer and some visual flair, and everyone's heart seems to be in the right place. But it's pretty clear why Dano threw his hat in.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Sep 30, 2016
2/5 25% Ben-Hur (2016) Ben-Hur, the remake of the remake, is an epic misfire starring no one you've ever heard of apart from, inevitably, Morgan Freeman.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Sep 9, 2016
83% Julieta (2016) The film's signature colour is red, which pulses on the screen like a hazard light... It's the colour of everything in this heartbreaking but hopeful film: rage, blood, heat, passion, danger, love.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Aug 25, 2016
75% The BFG (2016) The film is held aloft by the loamy charm of Mark Rylance. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 21, 2016
3/5 82% Chevalier (2016) The film is at its most persuasive as a goofy comedy, personified in the pathetic Dimitris fighting for approval by any means.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Jul 20, 2016
4/5 82% Tale of Tales (Il racconto dei racconti) (2016) Although it doesn't quite know how to round off its triptych of narratives, the film leaves you almost entirely sated, and invigorated by fresh and fantastical vistas too rarely visited by cinema outside the mind of Tim Burton.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Jun 17, 2016
92% The Nice Guys (2016) Its over-exuberance is entirely forgivable.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2016
3/5 73% A Hologram for the King (2016) What's left is the pleasure of Hanks, the same as he ever was, in an inconsequential shaggy dog tale.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted May 19, 2016
3/5 72% Our Kind of Traitor (2016) The spycraft elements make for some nailbiting sequences... Despite an impressive cast on reliably good form, there's no one really to root for.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted May 12, 2016
87% Dheepan (2016) In the end Audiard is as big a softie as any cornball salesman in Tinseltown. It's just that his redemptions are bitterly earned and bring sweet relief.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Apr 7, 2016
2/5 52% Risen (2016) The problem is the drama. As in the entire lack of it.‐ The Arts Desk
Read More | Posted Mar 18, 2016