Jay Carmody

Jay Carmody
Jay Carmody's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer® when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Washington Star
Publications: Washington Star

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
88% Black Orpheus (Orfeu Negro) (1959) Miss Dawn is a vivid performer who meets a worthy match in Bruno Melo, a noted athlete in Rio. whose amateur standing as an actor is deftly concealed in his passionate Orpheus portrait. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 26, 2021
93% The Pearl (La perla) (1947) Despite its shortcomings, The Pearl is refreshingly distinctive, sometimes brilliant in its simplicity. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 19, 2021
97% North by Northwest (1959) The acting in North by Northwest has that brilliant, cool surface that represents the perfect polish for the best of Hitchcock. Grant, to be sure, is the director's Number 1 hand at this sort of thing. Mason, nevertheless, comes close to matching him. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2021
98% Rear Window (1954) Alfred Hitchcock, a wizard at finding the exciting angle from which to view life, comes up with one of his all-time bests in Rear Window... Rarely has Hitchcock been so entertaining as in this act of turning moviegoers into unabashed Peeping Toms. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 7, 2021
94% The Women (1939) Without delay let it be said that [The Women] is as slick, clever, beautifully groomed and venomous piece of entertainment as Hollywood has produced. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted May 24, 2021
97% Pather Panchali (1955) In its own novel idiom, at once Indian and universal, Pather Panchali has so much more to say than most films... Nor is its eloquence altogether visual. It also has a musical score by Ravi Shankar, to deepen both its moods. and its meaning. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted May 5, 2021
99% On the Waterfront (1954) Miss Saint, a first timer in films, turns in a powerful, if subdued, performance as Terry Malloy's inspiring girl; Rod Steiger is impressive as the hero's craven brother... and the others are the kind of actors Director Kazan insists upon. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 8, 2021
93% The Hitch-hiker (1953) Behind a camera, Miss Lupino operates with as much intelligence and intensity as she ever did before one as an actress. The bleak and menacing landscape representing backroads Mexico is one she turns into one of her film's most dramatic aspects. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2021
90% Babes in Arms (1939) It may not be art, in fact no one pretends that it is, but the people who know they like Mickey must think of him hereafter as the nearest thing to a universal genius the screen has yet unveiled. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2021
93% Intruder in the Dust (1949) Intruder in the Dust is full of the kind of performances that could be called blazing. The most affecting of these is the almost ominously quiet, honest portrait of Lucas by Actor Hernandez. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2021
81% The Man With the Golden Arm (1955) It Is an interesting picture but neither so interesting nor effective as it might have been had Producer-Director Otto Preminger subjected himself to a few restraints. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 22, 2020
81% Cabin in the Sky (1943) The former Broadway musical puts bounce, melody, comedy and poignance back on the screen in a fashion designed to work wonders for the war-jaded spirits of the body politic. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2020
No Score Yet Casanova Brown (1944) On the whole, without managing to be a great comedy, Producer Johnson's picture will make the Cooper following happy at the chance to see the lanky one playing again what looks like the typical American small-town guy. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
98% Home of the Brave (1949) Unlike most screenplays, the excitement of Home of the Brave comes from without as well as within the machine-made product. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2020
75% Cyrano de Bergerac (1950) The screen's collection of immortal heroes is increased by the addition now of Cyrano de Bergerac. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 2, 2020
60% Night and Day (1946) To demur that it let a few false notes get into Porter's life story is merely querulousness that will never enter the heads or the reactions of the multitudes who will enjoy it. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2020
100% Laura (1944) Murder, as we say, has not looked so attractive in several seasons. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 17, 2020
No Score Yet Deported (1950) What they have tried to do is blend a romantic fairy tale and a gangster melodrama, retaining the best features of both.What they retained is something else. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 10, 2020
No Score Yet Close To My Heart (1951) James R. Webb who wrote the story gave [Ray Milland and Gene Tierney] too little to work with. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 9, 2020
100% The Lavender Hill Mob (1951) The Lavender Hill Mob is character and situation farce at its best. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 9, 2020
No Score Yet L'affaire du courrier de Lyon (1937) In this screen drama of a man who paid with his life for a crime which he did not commit, there is more grim excitement than is the patron's portion in a dozen usual pictures. It is scarcely pretty, but it compensates in power for any unbalance. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 9, 2020
96% Panic in the Streets (1950) It is a blend of suspense and violence built around the 48-hour battle of the United States Public Health Service to forestall a pnumonic plague outbreak in a large city. It is the work of that master of melodrama, Elia Kazan, whose direction is expert. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 9, 2020
97% Monsieur Verdoux (1947) Its merit, to be crisp about it, is uneven. It has intervals that are highly entertaining. These occur when Chaplin reverts to type, the talented entertainer. It has other passages when it is nothing more than a pious, profound bore. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2020
95% Aleksandr Nevskiy (Alexander Nevsky) (1938) A spectacular lesson in medieval history taught by one of the cinema's great masters. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2020
100% True Confession (1937) The wild, wild wave of comedy which has been sweeping over the country from Hollywood for months has produced nothing more farcical and funny. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
86% Saboteur (1942) It looks like something warmed over, a melange of cops and robbers and romance with Freudian traces, prepared with a kind of casual confidence that It would get by on Its flashes at cleverness. It doesn't. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
100% The Lady Eve (1941) From now on, it is almost an imperative to keep an eye peeled for pictures with the Sturges touch. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted May 1, 2020
60% The Cimarron Kid (1952) Murphy who showed a decent talent for acting in the recent Red Badge of Courage is all the way back where he began in his latest performance. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 28, 2020
71% Lady on a Train (1945) As we say, you will find it amusing at isolated intervals, particularly those in which Deanna shows that she has grown up enough artistically to be quite a commedienne when her material is worth working on. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 21, 2020
86% Wyoming Mail (1950) Except for the caliber of its cast, Wyoming Mail follows the formula of mail robbery with complete fidelity. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 14, 2020
No Score Yet Flesh And Fantasy (1943) The revelation is one you are likely to find interesting. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 14, 2020
No Score Yet Cry Havoc (1943) Cry Havoc, as we say, has been done before, but there are things about it to remember in spite of the story's familiar pattern. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 14, 2020
100% Shadow of a Doubt (1943) As we say. it is a curtailed Hitchcock, but still recognizably the one who tops the lot in artful melodrama. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 9, 2020
98% His Girl Friday (1940) The whole casting of the picture, indeed, represents Mr. Hawks at his best in a department in which his skill needs no further praise. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2020
97% Born Yesterday (1950) It requires absolute virtuosity to get the full portrait of this hilarious heroine on the stage. This is exactly what Miss Holliday gives it. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2020
100% Stagecoach (1939) Depending upon story rather than boxoffice names this narrative of the opening of the West manages to be one of the more significant achievements of the cinema in recent months. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 18, 2020
98% The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) The genius of Wyler as director of the Goldwyn screenplay is that he never lets his principals become mere symbols and succeeds marvelously in keeping their story from becoming fuzzy and too involved. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
96% An American in Paris (1951) It seems no exaggeration to say that An American in Paris is the most delightful movie musical ever made. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
89% How Green Was My Valley (1941) You are left with a memory of something as fine as any motion picture could hope to be. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
71% The Fighting 69th (1940) Richly schooled in the art of impersonating a snarling, ratlike human, [James] Cagney here has an opportunity to do the part in its most repulsive coloring. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
90% Gone With the Wind (1939) In casting Vivien Leigh as Scarlett O'Hara, Clark Gable as RhettButler, Olivia De Havilland as Melanie and Leslie Howard as Ashley Wilkes, [David O. Selznick] brought the major characters to life just as they existed in the book. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
99% All About Eve (1950) Screen gems have been rare of late but All About Eve... puts things back in balance - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
81% Going My Way (1944) Every other blue moon a picture comes along that sends the most ulcerous and dyspeptic moviegoer dancing and singing into the street. Such a screen drama is Going My Way. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
93% You Can't Take It With You (1938) It rates as a brilliant piece of entertainment worthy of the hall mark of Frank Capra, who made it. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 29, 2020
95% Hamlet (1948) Olivier brings more of everything to his Hamlet, more energy, more voice, more virility, but most of all he brings to it more understanding of Shakespeare's hero. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
98% The Lost Weekend (1945) For once... a cinema narrative achieves dramatic impact worthy of the adjectives the industry has squandered recklessly on its lesser wares. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2020
95% Mrs. Miniver (1942) There is nothing left for the critic at this point but to corroborate all that has been said of it, to add his own warmest words of acclaim - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2020
95% All the King's Men (1949) Warren's demagogue turned loose on a democracy too innocent to recognize a political demon is a man to deep-freeze the heart. As movie hero-villains go. he is the best character the screen has found in a long time. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 21, 2020
No Score Yet No Man of Her Own (1950) Leisen's direction is never artful enough to give plausibility to the adventures that overtake Miss Stanwyck. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2019
99% The Third Man (1949) The astounding acting bit, it may turn out, is that contributed by Orson Welles. As the object of this chilling search, Welles for once is pulled back to the size of a gifted actor, a trick for which he and a lot of old Welles' admirers can thank Reed. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2019