Jay Carmody

Jay Carmody
Jay Carmody's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Washington Star
Publications: Washington Star

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
100% Stagecoach (1939) Depending upon story rather than boxoffice names this narrative of the opening of the West manages to be one of the more significant achievements of the cinema in recent months. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 18, 2020
96% The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) The genius of Wyler as director of the Goldwyn screenplay is that he never lets his principals become mere symbols and succeeds marvelously in keeping their story from becoming fuzzy and too involved. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
96% An American in Paris (1951) It seems no exaggeration to say that An American in Paris is the most delightful movie musical ever made. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
91% How Green Was My Valley (1941) You are left with a memory of something as fine as any motion picture could hope to be. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
67% The Fighting 69th (1940) Richly schooled in the art of impersonating a snarling, ratlike human, [James] Cagney here has an opportunity to do the part in its most repulsive coloring. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
91% Gone With the Wind (1939) In casting Vivien Leigh as Scarlett O'Hara, Clark Gable as RhettButler, Olivia De Havilland as Melanie and Leslie Howard as Ashley Wilkes, [David O. Selznick] brought the major characters to life just as they existed in the book. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
99% All About Eve (1950) Screen gems have been rare of late but All About Eve... puts things back in balance - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
83% Going My Way (1944) Every other blue moon a picture comes along that sends the most ulcerous and dyspeptic moviegoer dancing and singing into the street. Such a screen drama is Going My Way. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
93% You Can't Take It With You (1938) It rates as a brilliant piece of entertainment worthy of the hall mark of Frank Capra, who made it. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 29, 2020
95% Hamlet (1948) Olivier brings more of everything to his Hamlet, more energy, more voice, more virility, but most of all he brings to it more understanding of Shakespeare's hero. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
100% The Lost Weekend (1945) For once... a cinema narrative achieves dramatic impact worthy of the adjectives the industry has squandered recklessly on its lesser wares. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2020
93% Mrs. Miniver (1942) There is nothing left for the critic at this point but to corroborate all that has been said of it, to add his own warmest words of acclaim - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2020
95% All the King's Men (1949) Warren's demagogue turned loose on a democracy too innocent to recognize a political demon is a man to deep-freeze the heart. As movie hero-villains go. he is the best character the screen has found in a long time. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 21, 2020
No Score Yet No Man of Her Own (1950) Leisen's direction is never artful enough to give plausibility to the adventures that overtake Miss Stanwyck. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2019
99% The Third Man (1949) The astounding acting bit, it may turn out, is that contributed by Orson Welles. As the object of this chilling search, Welles for once is pulled back to the size of a gifted actor, a trick for which he and a lot of old Welles' admirers can thank Reed. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2019
82% The Lady From Shanghai (1948) [Welles] hurls restraint to the winds and when he is through with it, his poor little story is reduced to a dramatic pulp. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2019
No Score Yet A Woman's Vengeance (1948) Some of the cinema's most gifted humans pool their talents in A Woman's Vengeance, but the result is only a moderately interesting melodrama. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2019
90% Stage Fright (1950) Alfred Hitchcock's murders are at their best when he does them In a jolly mood. That is the flavor of the one in Stage Fright... It is a welcome change for the master who has been rather sober recently in dealing with his aristocratic corpses. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 13, 2019
No Score Yet I Met a Murderer (1939) I Met a Murderer obviously was a picture made on a shoe string, and it turns out to be one of its major virtues that it was. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 13, 2019
No Score Yet Four Faces West (1948) There is not much incident in Four Faces West, not enough to keep it entirely from representing another six-reel horseback ride, but everybody is so agreeable and charming that one can't help liking them all. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 13, 2019
94% Rope (1948) The resultant study of high class homicide is revolutionary, which, spectacular though the word may sound, does not mean that Rope is Hitchcock's best screenplay. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 13, 2019
No Score Yet Take a Letter, Darling (Green-Eyed Woman) (1942) It is even prettier than it is clever, but it is much of the latter, too. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 13, 2019
No Score Yet The Great Man's Lady (1942) A semi-listless affair which is saved from dullness by Miss Stanwyck's energetic and versatile performance. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 13, 2019
90% The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) In trying so feverishly to be realistic, Welles has drained the life pretty much out of the Indiana family of whom Tarkington once wrote so straight-forwardly that he won a Pulitzer prize for his efforts. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2019
94% Foreign Correspondent (1940) A two-hour demonstration of what movies can be, and so rarely are. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2019
100% Love Crazy (1941) In adapting their script to the by now perfect reflexes of the film's stars, the authors have shown a minimum of restraint. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2019
100% 5 Fingers (1952) It would be a shame to miss the drama of this story. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2019
No Score Yet Meet Danny Wilson (1952) A movie which might be described as using half a million dollars worth of talent in a $4.35 script. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2019
No Score Yet This Woman Is Dangerous (1952) The surprise of the Warner film is that two men with such pretty writing names as Geoffrey Homes and George Worthington Yates could have written such a bad script. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2019
100% You're in the Navy Now (1951) Gary Cooper and an experimental submarine chaser are a comedy pair you would not want to miss. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 5, 2019
100% Citizen Kane (1941) It proves Welles' restless, reckless genius -- as exasperating as it is fascinating -- is triumphant in the new medium as it was in the old ones of theater and radio. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2019
No Score Yet Retreat, Hell! (1952) Joseph H. Lewis directed Retreat, Hell, and he never lacks for logical reason to keep it moving loud, rough and fast. - Washington Star EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 30, 2019