Jeannette Catsoulis Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Jeannette Catsoulis

Jeannette Catsoulis
Jeannette Catsoulis's reviews (from any publication) always count toward the Tomatometer because this critic is a Tomatometer-approved critic.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
100% Sidemen: Long Road to Glory (2017) Mr. Rosenbaum and his producer Jasin Cadic shape a narrative of professional insecurity and personal resilience.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2017
83% Walk With Me (2017) Sometimes dreamy but mostly dissatisfying, "Walk With Me" offers no clarity for the curious.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2017
100% California Typewriter (2017) This quirky, obsessive documentary is about so much more than broken keys and busted type wheels. It's really about how we create art.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2017
83% The Trip to Spain (2017) Even artists as gifted as these two can only hitchhike so long on the charisma of household names like Mick Jagger and Michael Caine, and the dueling impressions that fuel the franchise have become effortful and repetitive.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
67% Annabelle: Creation (2017) As with last year's "Lights Out," [Mr. Sandberg] proves a master of the flash-scare, a nifty choreographer of precipitous timing and striptease visuals. But he's also adroit with more leisurely horrors‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
31% The Only Living Boy in New York (2017) Everyone ... works hard to transcend the artifice, and they deserve better. So, for that matter, do Simon & Garfunkel.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
62% Footnotes (Sur quel pied danser) (2017) This feather-light French confection, written and directed by Paul Calori and Kostia Testut, addresses its dignity-of-work thesis with sweetness and heart.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2017
18% Wish Upon (2017) The splatter is deployed cautiously and sometimes wittily, the story moving briskly from wishes granted to costs exacted ...‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2017
76% The Little Hours (2017) A 14th-century farce that, given its comically credentialed players, ought to be a great deal funnier than it is.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2017
75% 13 Minutes (Elser) (2017) With a little more shading and originality, "13 Minutes" might have pushed beyond its familiar Nazi tropes to shape something more immediate and infinitely more potent: an ominous portrait of radicalization.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2017
100% Nowhere To Hide (2017) The look is rough, the emotions always hovering near the surface. Yet, buoyed by Mr. Sharif's cheery personality, these can sometimes be defiantly upbeat.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2017
91% In Pursuit of Silence (2017) Its arguments range wide without going deep, but its factoids about the medical benefits of hanging out in a forest - and the cognitive costs of a noisy school or hospital - are fascinating and persuasive.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2017
54% 47 Meters Down (2017) "47 Meters Down" - despite a clever final section - struggles to extract tension from clamor and agitation.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017
100% Harmonium (Fuchi ni tatsu) (2017) This chilly tale of violent secrets and unvoiced misery relies heavily on the skill of actors who seem to know that one false move could tip the whole enterprise into comedy.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017
13% Kill Switch (2017) A pointless gush of science-fiction bilge.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017
100% 11:55 (2017) Sincere, sometimes brief performances - including those of John Leguizamo as a disabled veteran, and Julia Stiles as the bitter wife of Nelson's nemesis - lend necessary oomph to a narrative that can, at times, verge on sleepy.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
95% Night School (2017) A movie about large setbacks and small triumphs, and the grit that takes you from one to the other.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
78% The Hero (2017) Without Lee's complicity in the triteness of his story - and Mr. Elliott's ability to sell it as a melancholy burden - this low-key feature by Brett Haley wouldn't be half as pleasurable.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
71% The Commune (Kollektivet) (2017) Sweeter and soapier than we've come to expect from the Danish director Thomas Vinterberg, "The Commune" swaddles the pain of a disintegrating marriage in a good-natured cocoon of laughter and larks.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 18, 2017
97% The Survivalist (2017) Impressively lean and rigidly controlled, "The Survivalist" achieves, at times, the primitive allure of a silent movie.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 17, 2017
40% Whisky Galore (2017) Beyond simple nostalgia ... the appeal of this limp retread is difficult to discern.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 11, 2017
69% The Wall (2017) The vein-popping mood is ultimately more exhausting than exciting.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 11, 2017
45% Paris Can Wait (Bonjour Anne) (2017) Little more than an indulgent wallow in gustatory privilege. By the time the final meal is devoured, you'll be wanting nothing so much as an antacid.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 10, 2017
51% The Dinner (2017) What we're left with is a morality play in which three deeply deplorable people - and one surprising white knight - wrestle with class privilege, mental illness and extremely silly food.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
71% Another Evil (2017) As quaint as the specters it works to expunge, "Another Evil" is an ultra-low-budget ghost story with an off-kilter sensibility that initially intrigues but ultimately fizzles.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
86% The Lovers (2017) Falling with a thud between two stools, it has neither the zip nor the zaniness of farce nor the airy vivacity of the best romantic comedies.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
74% Buster's Mal Heart (2017) If the story is too tricky to realize its themes or welcome the impatient, it also contains enough empathy to humanize a character who's part man, part spiritual symbol.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2017
90% A Dark Song (2017) Virtually a chamber piece with just two primary characters, the movie dives into the black arts with methodical restraint and escalating unease.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2017
21% Rupture (2017) Dreary, derivative and flat-out dopey, this dragged-out torture tale will disappoint even those whose hearts race whenever they see a female character strapped to a bed.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2017
100% Let It Fall: LA 1982-1992 (2017) Teeming with acts both heroic and reprehensible, John Ridley's wrenchingly humane documentary, "Let It Fall: Los Angeles 1982-1992," reveals the Los Angeles riots as the almost inevitable culmination of a decade of heightening racial tensions.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 20, 2017
50% The Promise (2017) Weighed down by the worthiness of its intentions, "The Promise" is a big, barren wartime romance that approaches the Armenian genocide with too much calculation and not nearly enough heat.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 20, 2017
93% Mimosas (2017) A movie that panders not at all to Western sensibilities, giving few pointers on a theme beyond the fortifying power of faith. For some viewers, that will be plenty.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 13, 2017
63% Tommy's Honour (2017) The performances are desultory, the musical score bullying and the drama - aside from the game-changing placement of inconvenient shrubbery - as predictable as Tom senior's steadily sprouting beard.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 13, 2017
89% Heal the Living (RĂ©parer les vivants) (2017) In the background, Alexandre Desplat's swoony score piles on the sentiment, but it's all just empty calories; what this movie desperately needs is conflict.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 13, 2017
48% The Ticket (2017) There are some gnarly questions - of faith, love and self-worth, for starters - at the heart of "The Ticket," if only its makers had chosen to address them.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 6, 2017
57% i hate myself :) (2017) Ugly to look at and even uglier to listen to, Joanna Arnow's whiny documentary "i hate myself :)" plays like an especially brutal exercise in self-analysis.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 5, 2017
93% All This Panic (2017) Adopting a meandering, free-flowing structure and woozily intimate photography, the director, Jenny Gage, and her husband, the cinematographer Tom Betterton, follow close and listen well.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 30, 2017
73% The Blackcoat's Daughter (February) (2017) Yes, it's a horror movie (the murder scenes suggest that the director has watched "Psycho" more than once), but even its most brutal acts pulse with inchoate sadness.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 30, 2017
55% Here Alone (2017) Given the familiarity of its premise - a handful of survivors brave the aftermath of a deadly, rage-inducing virus - "Here Alone" is unexpectedly engaging.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 30, 2017
16% CHIPS (2017) A fascination with posteriors - both human and feline - isn't the worst thing about "CHIPS," but it's up there.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2017
95% Prevenge (2017) What hoists this bloody battiness above much of the scrappily low-budget horror pack is the smartness of its execution and the strength of the movie's central performance.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 22, 2017
90% A Woman, A Part (2017) Touching on issues of artistic survival and the porous boundary between work and pleasure, Ms. Subrin, an accomplished visual artist and filmmaker, sifts addiction, celebrity and the plight of the aging actress into something rarefied yet real.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2017
78% T2 Trainspotting (2017) While "T2" might be middle-aged, it's very far from moribund, the despondent base notes shouldering a story of revenge and regret, amity and acceptance.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 16, 2017
92% The Devil's Candy (2017) Mr. Byrne - relying almost entirely on a doom-metal soundtrack, game performers and a grungy palette of oily browns and moldy greens - somehow whips his ingredients into an improbably taut man-versus-Satan showdown.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 15, 2017
90% Raw (2017) An exceptionally classy-looking movie about deeply horrifying behavior.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 9, 2017
87% My Scientology Movie (2017) At times it plays like an extended skit on "The Daily Show"; yet its disorder also makes its insights - like how strongly the church's training sessions resemble acting classes - feel refreshingly organic.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 8, 2017
23% Table 19 (2017) Slapstick and sap vie for prominence in "Table 19," a comedy so lazy that it actually features someone falling off a log.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
No Score Yet Water & Power: A California Heist (2017) Guided by the work of a handful of burr-like journalists, this dense and disturbing documentary dives into the regulatory quagmire of California water rights with more courage than hope.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
73% Catfight (2017) Drawing its energy from revenge and its jagged humor from a black well of contempt for the wealthy, the movie fashions a world in which the only likable characters are the crazy and the doomed.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
9% Bitter Harvest (2017) The millions who died during this real-life tragedy deserve a stronger memorial than this one.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2017