Jeannette Catsoulis Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Jeannette Catsoulis

Jeannette Catsoulis
Jeannette Catsoulis's reviews (from any publication) always count toward the Tomatometer because this critic is a Tomatometer-approved critic.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
65% Happy Death Day (2017) Becoming a decent person requires an awful lot of dying in "Happy Death Day," a snappy horror-comedy with a gentle romantic spine.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Oct 12, 2017
57% Breathe (2017) This exceptional life ... is smothered by a cloying fairy tale romance that turns every challenge the couple faces into a lark.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Oct 12, 2017
63% Goodbye Christopher Robin (2017) A stiffly depressing portrait of toffee-nosed child abuse.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2017
100% Bending the Arc (2017) [Dr. Farmer's] quiet outrage over the widely-held assumption that it's futile to treat the global poor drives this story, which is finally as much about the triumph of a philosophy as of medicine.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Oct 5, 2017
43% The Mountain Between Us (2017) To watch the magnetic Idris Elba trudge through a monumental dud like "The Mountain Between Us" is almost physically painful.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Oct 5, 2017
93% Brawl in Cell Block 99 (2017) This painstakingly paced thriller displays an intensity of purpose that makes it impossible to dismiss as well-executed trash.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Oct 5, 2017
No Score Yet Autumn, Autumn (2016) Though disappointment and loneliness guide its conversations, the movie isn't bleak; it's a touching and tender commentary on the need to be seen and the desire to be heard.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
97% Lucky (2017) Nothing much happens in "Lucky," and then everything does.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
86% Abundant Acreage Available (2017) The director elects ... to back away from the story's edgier, more unnerving possibilities in favor of something altogether more soggy and formless.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
76% The Tiger Hunter (2017) "The Tiger Hunter" might balk at the harsher details of immigrant life, but it has a generosity of spirit that lifts everyone up.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 21, 2017
50% Kingsman: The Golden Circle (2017) "Circle" is an emotionally sterile lark, its wounds inflicted with brolly and bullwhip, a smirk and a shrug.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 20, 2017
19% Woodshock (2017) Depressingly dull and terminally inarticulate.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 20, 2017
23% The Wilde Wedding (2017) [An] execrable remarriage comedy, one that's mystifyingly seeded with acting heavyweights.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
93% Rat Film (2017) Equal parts disturbing and humorous, informative and bizarre, "Rat Film" is a brilliantly imaginative and formally experimental essay on how Baltimore has dealt with its rat problem and manipulated its black population.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
94% Indivisible (Indivisibili) (2016) Shot with a dreamy fabulism that merges the gorgeous and the grotesque, "Indivisible," the third feature from Edoardo De Angelis, draws on a rich vein of Italian cinematic history to deliver an adventurous ode to freedom and sisterhood.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 13, 2017
76% The Limehouse Golem (2017) Marrying fact and fiction, Jane Goldman's seamy screenplay is wildly overstuffed; but the director, Juan Carlos Medina, gives the music hall scenes a rowdy authenticity.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 7, 2017
100% Trophy (2017) The intimacy of the film's images and the surprising candor of its participants are disarming: Whatever your initial response, be prepared to re-evaluate.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 7, 2017
22% Rememory (2017) The writers of "Rememory," Mark Palansky (who also directed) and Michael Vukadinovich, mash a fertile premise into sentimental mush.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 7, 2017
30% I Do... Until I Don't (2017) Painted in the broadest possible strokes, these ropy relationships agitate a movie that has neither a coherent point nor an authentic character.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2017
62% Kill Me Please (Mate-me por favor) (2017) Like the teenage girls who monopolize its attention, "Kill Me Please" is moody, lovely, preening and libidinous.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2017
51% England Is Mine (2017) There is ... a great deal of moping.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 24, 2017
40% Death Note (2017) Cramming several tons of plot into a one-pound screenplay, the three writers ... have little option but to condense. That said, Mr. Wingard's eye for a stylish image hasn't dimmed.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 24, 2017
100% Sidemen: Long Road to Glory (2017) Mr. Rosenbaum and his producer Jasin Cadic shape a narrative of professional insecurity and personal resilience.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2017
86% Walk With Me (2017) Sometimes dreamy but mostly dissatisfying, "Walk With Me" offers no clarity for the curious.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2017
100% California Typewriter (2017) This quirky, obsessive documentary is about so much more than broken keys and busted type wheels. It's really about how we create art.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2017
85% The Trip to Spain (2017) Even artists as gifted as these two can only hitchhike so long on the charisma of household names like Mick Jagger and Michael Caine, and the dueling impressions that fuel the franchise have become effortful and repetitive.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
69% Annabelle: Creation (2017) As with last year's "Lights Out," [Mr. Sandberg] proves a master of the flash-scare, a nifty choreographer of precipitous timing and striptease visuals. But he's also adroit with more leisurely horrors‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
32% The Only Living Boy in New York (2017) Everyone ... works hard to transcend the artifice, and they deserve better. So, for that matter, do Simon & Garfunkel.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
67% Footnotes (Sur quel pied danser) (2017) This feather-light French confection, written and directed by Paul Calori and Kostia Testut, addresses its dignity-of-work thesis with sweetness and heart.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2017
17% Wish Upon (2017) The splatter is deployed cautiously and sometimes wittily, the story moving briskly from wishes granted to costs exacted ...‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2017
77% The Little Hours (2017) A 14th-century farce that, given its comically credentialed players, ought to be a great deal funnier than it is.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2017
76% 13 Minutes (Elser) (2017) With a little more shading and originality, "13 Minutes" might have pushed beyond its familiar Nazi tropes to shape something more immediate and infinitely more potent: an ominous portrait of radicalization.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2017
100% Nowhere To Hide (2017) The look is rough, the emotions always hovering near the surface. Yet, buoyed by Mr. Sharif's cheery personality, these can sometimes be defiantly upbeat.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2017
92% In Pursuit of Silence (2017) Its arguments range wide without going deep, but its factoids about the medical benefits of hanging out in a forest - and the cognitive costs of a noisy school or hospital - are fascinating and persuasive.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2017
53% 47 Meters Down (2017) "47 Meters Down" - despite a clever final section - struggles to extract tension from clamor and agitation.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017
100% Harmonium (Fuchi ni tatsu) (2017) This chilly tale of violent secrets and unvoiced misery relies heavily on the skill of actors who seem to know that one false move could tip the whole enterprise into comedy.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017
11% Kill Switch (2017) A pointless gush of science-fiction bilge.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017
100% 11:55 (2017) Sincere, sometimes brief performances - including those of John Leguizamo as a disabled veteran, and Julia Stiles as the bitter wife of Nelson's nemesis - lend necessary oomph to a narrative that can, at times, verge on sleepy.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
95% Night School (2017) A movie about large setbacks and small triumphs, and the grit that takes you from one to the other.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
77% The Hero (2017) Without Lee's complicity in the triteness of his story - and Mr. Elliott's ability to sell it as a melancholy burden - this low-key feature by Brett Haley wouldn't be half as pleasurable.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
71% The Commune (Kollektivet) (2017) Sweeter and soapier than we've come to expect from the Danish director Thomas Vinterberg, "The Commune" swaddles the pain of a disintegrating marriage in a good-natured cocoon of laughter and larks.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 18, 2017
97% The Survivalist (2017) Impressively lean and rigidly controlled, "The Survivalist" achieves, at times, the primitive allure of a silent movie.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 17, 2017
40% Whisky Galore (2017) Beyond simple nostalgia ... the appeal of this limp retread is difficult to discern.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 11, 2017
67% The Wall (2017) The vein-popping mood is ultimately more exhausting than exciting.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 11, 2017
45% Paris Can Wait (Bonjour Anne) (2017) Little more than an indulgent wallow in gustatory privilege. By the time the final meal is devoured, you'll be wanting nothing so much as an antacid.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 10, 2017
51% The Dinner (2017) What we're left with is a morality play in which three deeply deplorable people - and one surprising white knight - wrestle with class privilege, mental illness and extremely silly food.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
71% Another Evil (2017) As quaint as the specters it works to expunge, "Another Evil" is an ultra-low-budget ghost story with an off-kilter sensibility that initially intrigues but ultimately fizzles.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
84% The Lovers (2017) Falling with a thud between two stools, it has neither the zip nor the zaniness of farce nor the airy vivacity of the best romantic comedies.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
72% Buster's Mal Heart (2017) If the story is too tricky to realize its themes or welcome the impatient, it also contains enough empathy to humanize a character who's part man, part spiritual symbol.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2017
90% A Dark Song (2017) Virtually a chamber piece with just two primary characters, the movie dives into the black arts with methodical restraint and escalating unease.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2017