Jennie Yabroff Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Jennie Yabroff

Jennie Yabroff
Jennie Yabroff's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Newsweek, Salon.com

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
92% Hype! (1996) Hype wants you to think that a few interviews with some less popular bands and some poorly shot concert footage lend the film an insider legitimacy and credibility that excuse it from the same accountability it demands from other media.‐ Salon.com
Read More | Posted Mar 18, 2015
42% Dinner for Schmucks (2010) Though the premise of Dinner for Schmucks is deeply cruel, we are supposed to laugh, because we trust that by the closing credits the characters will have matured into upstanding men.‐ Newsweek
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2010
81% Cyrus (2010) Cyrus successfully walks the line between dark comedy and scary movie, thanks to the performances by Hill, Reilly, and Tomei, which are uniformly great.‐ Newsweek
Read More | Posted Jun 17, 2010
80% Daddy Longlegs (2010) Daddy Longlegs may shock you, but it will also make you reexamine your ideas about parenthood, and what it means to be a father.‐ Newsweek
Read More | Posted May 20, 2010
95% The Class (2008) The Class isn't a documentary, but the scenes have the loose, slow-cooked feel of a director turning on a camera and waiting to see what happens -- think Mike Leigh meets Frederick Wiseman.‐ Newsweek
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2009
77% Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008) Spielberg is an efficient, consummately competent director, and the action sequences deliver exactly what's promised, if nothing more.‐ Newsweek
Read More | Posted May 19, 2008
67% The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (2008) Under all the gimmickry and effects, there's a nice story to tell -- as anyone who has read the books knows.‐ Newsweek
Read More | Posted May 15, 2008
88% Gridlock'd (1997) A surprisingly light-hearted comedy about what happens when two self-imposed exiles from society decide to go straight and look to the system for a little help.‐ Salon.com
Read More | Posted Jan 1, 2000