John Gillett

John Gillett
John Gillett's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer® when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Sight and Sound Monthly Film Bulletin

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
85% Woman in a Dressing Gown (1957) Despite the over-facile resolution of the last scene, one's final impression is of an emotional drama of considerable intensity. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 31, 2020
43% C'era una volta... (Cinderella: Italian Style) (More Than a Miracle) (1967) Having been granted such a visual feast, it seems grudging to complain about the awkward dubbing. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 18, 2020
No Score Yet The Butterfly Lovers (1954) The film's unaffected purity of style, and the intense poetic quality of the playing, make it an unusually rewarding, and often moving, experience. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 18, 2020
89% The Scarlet Empress (1934) Dietrich's sweetly accented delivery makes the most of both good and bad lines. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 17, 2020
No Score Yet The Story of Flaming Years (Povest plamennykh let) (1961) Too many scenes are impregnated with a kind of crude Stalinist bombast, so that fervour turns into style less rhetoric. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 17, 2020
40% The Battle of Austerlitz (1960) The film has all the hallmarks of a great big bore (even in this heavily cut version, the first hair does seem pretty interminable); and yet the personality of its creator is there all the time, mixing dross with gold as he has always done. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 17, 2020
No Score Yet Time Stood Still (1958) [Director Ermanno Olmi's] is the gentlest, quietest form of observation, effortlessly detailed, always alert to the interaction between character and background. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 17, 2020
63% Exodus (1960) Exodus, then, sees Preminger's sheer movie-making talent at its most extended. Unhappily, the ability to sustain a large canvas does not necessarily result in a good film. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 11, 2020
92% The Guns of Navarone (1961) Above all, the film lacks a firm controlling hand which would have ironed out passages of incoherent editing and made the climax really tell. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 11, 2020
96% The World of Apu (1960) Apu is not only the logical last act of the trilogy but a unique work in its own right. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2020
100% Jalsaghar (The Music Room) (1958) Although it cannot be said to outclass the best parts of [Ray's Apu] trilogy, it proves to be an engrossing experiment in a deliberately minor key. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2020
100% Ankur (1974) [Ankur] ntroduces a marvellous new actress, Shabana Azmi, as Lakshmi, and it is she who gives the central relationship its suppressed sensuality and force. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
67% The Truth (1960) The basic fault can be traced to a script which attempts an examination of French criminal procedure brought face to face with the confused habits of the younger generation. - Monthly Film Bulletin EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2018
86% How the West Was Won (1963) Here, then, is a film with apparently something for everyone. Certainly its team of four ace cameramen have provided a full quota of visual splendours and the rich colour definition in the long shots communicates an authentic thrill of pleasure. - Sight and Sound EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 18, 2012