John Kinloch

John Kinloch
John Kinloch's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): California Eagle
Publications: California Eagle

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
No Score Yet Blind Alibi (1938) There is considerable suspense in the climactic passages. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 11, 2019
No Score Yet The Crowd Roars (1938) The Crowd Roars could have been great drama -- real and compelling. As it is, the picture is a rousing little opus with two or three outstanding portrayals and the usual incredible, off-key happy ending. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 4, 2019
No Score Yet Keep Smiling (1938) Good entertainment. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 4, 2019
No Score Yet We're Going to Be Rich (1938) Miss Gracie Fields appears to great advantage, while tremendous support is given by Victor McLaglen and Brian Donlevy. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 4, 2019
No Score Yet Fast Company (1938) [Fast Company is] sprinkled with fast dialogue and hilarious situations. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 4, 2019
No Score Yet Straight, Place and Show (1938) Either you like the Ritz Brothers or you don't, I do. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 4, 2019
No Score Yet Blind Alley (1939) [A] neat, well-paced little melodrama. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 4, 2019
No Score Yet Valley of the Giants (1938) Photography is outstanding, with several gorgeous shots of the northern California landscape. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 4, 2019
No Score Yet Reform School (1939) [Director Popkin] has done a thorough and competent job serving up this nicely balanced film in palatable fashion. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 4, 2019
No Score Yet The Lady and the Mob (1939) Nice nutty entertainment. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 4, 2019
No Score Yet South of Suez (1940) A striking demonstration of George Raft's recent reported intellectual development was his refusal to appear in this picture. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 4, 2019
No Score Yet A Man to Remember (1938) Its simplicity, truthfulness, and down to earth drama is more sharply etched because to the numerous scenes of biting satire. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 4, 2019
No Score Yet The Beachcomber (1938) The Beachcomber returns Charles Laughton to the screen in one of his most striking portrayals. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2019
No Score Yet That Certain Age (1938) Direction of this film is sleek and sophisticated. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2019
No Score Yet Three Loves Has Nancy (1938) The picture is distinguished by snappy direction, expert performances and often witty script. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2019
No Score Yet Young Dr. Kildare (1938) Lew Ayres is one step ahead in the direction of the film eminence that was once his. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2019
No Score Yet Four Mothers (1941) This is alright if you like goo. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2019
No Score Yet Escape (1940) The film effectively proves the following: (1) Conrad Veidt is one of the world's finest actors; (2) Robert Taylor is industriously learning how to act. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2019
No Score Yet The Great Waltz (1938) Passages of the film are visually magnificent, but the whole lacks dramatic power. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2019
No Score Yet Three Smart Girls Grow Up (1939) Three Smart Girls Grow Up is another spike in the Durbin legend. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2019
No Score Yet Men with Wings (1938) The brutal force Wellman achieves in his climactic passages is due, conversely, to the restraint with which he handles them. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2019
98% Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) Kids will like the film most because of the Dwarfs' hilarious antics. Grown-ups because they will think they're kids again. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
100% Four Daughters (1938) It presents Miss Priscilla Lane... in a tender and beautiful performance. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
92% You Can't Take It With You (1938) Frank Capra has scored again. Hence-far, You Can't Take It With You is the most likely entrant for the 1938 Academy Award. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
100% The Letter (1940) Expert direction, splendid performances and an amazing score combine to make this somber picture one of the most satisfying ilm experiences of the year. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
100% The Philadelphia Story (1940) Aside from being the season's most spectacular success, this picture is distinguished by adroit direction, clever scripting and superb performances. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
100% The Long Voyage Home (1940) Performances are uniformly excellent, Mitchell topping everything he has ever done in motion-pictures. Ian Hunter and John Wayne are brilliant. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
94% Penny Serenade (1941) Its objectives are excellently realized, and it stands as a visual refutation of the industry's axiom that movies must move. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
60% The Great Lie (1941) This is another in the series of intelligent, talkative pictures of which La Davis has become the patron saint. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
89% Topper Returns (1941) Whatever lift the new Topper offers is found in the superb capering of Eddie (Rochester) Anderson. For the most part, however, this picture can t decide whether it's high comedy, mystery melodrama or burlesque. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
No Score Yet That Night in Rio (1941) Except for Miranda, it is, at best, tedious. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
No Score Yet The Cowboy and the Lady (1938) George Montgomery and Mary Beth Hughes, comparative newcomers, romp through this obvious "B' flicker with a great deal more intelligence and restraint than a lot of people we could both name, - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
100% Blood and Sand (1941) The fact that this film degenerates toward a dull funk in its concluding moments does not rob it of on unmatched pictorial beauty, the most sensitive and imaginative use of Technicolor yet recorded. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
100% The Lady Eve (1941) The sexiest comedy in many a day. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
No Score Yet A Girl, a Guy and a Gob (1941) One of the season's funniest. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
91% Meet John Doe (1941) A smooth. Capracareful film replete with social preachment and a magnificent portrayal by Gary Cooper. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
89% Road to Zanzibar (1941) A perfect musicomedy. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
100% The Sea Wolf (1941) It's tight, terse and terrific. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
40% Men of Boys Town (1941) Pretty soggy stuff. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
50% Song of Freedom (1937) In an abstract way, you want to shout, "Great work! Great courage! Keep up the good spirit, old thing!" and suchlike. But the picture doesn't jell. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
No Score Yet Son of Ingagi (1940) Spencer Williams turned out the story. It stretches your imagination all over the lot but it's good fun anyway. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
No Score Yet The Hurricane (1937) Hurricane was really not much more than the spectacle of huge billows of water swamping a South Sea Island; nevertheless, its effect is nearly stupendous. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
78% The Life of Emile Zola (1937) So simple and powerful is Muni's Zola that one feels him to be. not a shadow on a screen, but a living person. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
No Score Yet Bad Man of Brimstone (1938) The Bad Man of Brimstone is Wallace Beery as you like him. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
No Score Yet Every Day's a Holiday (1937) For the last two or three pictures, Mae West fans have had to fight losing battles in her defense. But now that's all over, for Every Day's a Holiday is one of the funniest pictures of the year. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
No Score Yet The Big Broadcast of 1938 (1937) Big Broadcast of 1938 brings back to the screen W.C. Fields, which would have been five if it hadn't also returned twenty or more others, each and every one of whom had to occupy the screen for the duration of five to ten minutes. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
No Score Yet The Storm (1938) This is very manly stuff -- full of brawls and sinking ships and explosions and icebergs and virile love. And good too. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
No Score Yet Service De Luxe (1938) With such a supporting cast, it is a marvel how the nominal stars were not completely submerged. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
No Score Yet Stand Up and Fight (1939) A colorful, stirring drama of early railway days. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
No Score Yet Tropic Holiday (1938) Martha Raye in a bull-fight and the singing of Tito Guizar are about the only things worth mentioning about the much-publicized Tropic Holiday. - California Eagle EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019