Jordan Raup

Jordan Raup
Tomatometer-approved critic
Publications: The Film Stage

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
A- 100% Mayor (2020) Far from a message movie, David Osit's sensitive documentary is a captivating, enlightening, and ultimately terrifying look at how to survive day by day when the fight for liberation can seem everlasting. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 4, 2021
B+ 100% Acasa, My Home (2020) An empathetic, complex portrait of the costs of independence. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 13, 2021
B 49% The Witches (2020) Zemeckis keeps proceedings fairly zippy and vibrant, and this entire endeavor plays like an easy lay-up to bounce back after audiences had little interest in Welcome to Marwen, though that's not a criticism. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 21, 2020
B+ 96% Feels Good Man (2020) Feels Good Man sketches a frighteningly recognizable timeline and environment for those whose formative years were intertwined with mid-to-late 2000s internet culture. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 2, 2020
C- 40% Irresistible (2020) This tedious film's biggest issues don't lie with its simplification of politics or often taking the feel-good easy route, but rather how flat the comedy lands. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2020
B 74% The King of Staten Island (2020) Judd Apatow's most emotionally attuned and narrowly focused work. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2020
B 92% The Vast of Night (2020) While a few too-prescient touches pull one out of the experience and its inevitable conclusion leaves a bit to be desired, The Vast of Night is a mightily admirable and entertaining tale that heralds the birth of a career to watch. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted May 27, 2020
B 87% The Trip to Greece (2020) For their final adventure, Coogan and Brydon stay the course with a tried and true formula, making for a satisfying finale while still leaving room for contemplation. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted May 18, 2020
D+ 57% The Hunt (2020) It's easy to imagine both sides of the increasingly divided political spectrum will finally come together in a rare moment of unity, concurring just how lazily written, shoddily constructed, and downright pointless the film is. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2020
B 100% Into the Deep (2020) A documentary that is truly hard to shake, it provides an intimate glimpse at true evil living amongst those who only saw the warning signs and red flags after the fact. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 17, 2020
B 96% A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon (2020) A light, cuddly adventure that's a step below its predecessor in shear (sorry!) inventiveness but still containing a wealth of delightful comedic gags. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2020
B+ 100% The Truffle Hunters (2020) The Truffle Hunters is primarily about those who make it their life's mission to track down this ever-rare species of food, and this documentary does endearing justice to their respective stories-humans and canines alike. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
C+ 86% Nine Days (2020) This debut film is no doubt a visually striking, well-composed calling card for Edson Oda, but the ideas it plays with are more interesting to discuss over a post-screening meal than to witness how they actually play out. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2020
B+ 99% On the Record (2020) On the Record is a sobering, clear-eyed account of sexual misconduct and assault by Russell Simmons-who, in damning evidence, moved to Bali where there is no extradition policy with the United States. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2020
B+ 98% Minari (2020) This is a delicate, small-scale drama told with an immense amount of authenticity by a filmmaker who is clearly attuned to the emotional rhythms of each of his characters. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2020
A- 94% Boys State (2020) This extraordinary portrait of a democratic process in microcosm is both a testament to how Washington, D.C. and the rest of the country could achieve bipartisanship as well as a look at what has led to such a fractured political system. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2020
D- 5% The Last Thing He Wanted (2020) Impossibly dull, gratingly lethargic, and utterly incoherent. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2020
C+ 66% Falling (2020) With his debut, Viggo Mortensen shows mindful consideration behind the camera telling a story that's not terribly interesting. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2020
A 98% Time (2020) A formally stunning masterwork of empathy, exhaustion, love, and rage. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2020
A- 100% Dick Johnson Is Dead (2020) With the brilliant Dick Johnson Is Dead, leave it to the director to create an exploration of death that is fun, bittersweet, and bursting with colorful imagination. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2020
B+ 87% Shirley (2020) Elisabeth Moss and Michael Stuhlbarg are having so much scenery-chewing fun they practically end up swallowing the single location. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2020
B 89% The Nest (2020) An exquisitely mounted drama that revels in letting minute character details slowly become elucidated as Durkin puts trust into his audience to pick up the pieces along the way. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2020
B- 87% Spaceship Earth (2020) A fascinating story full of twists yet one that could've used some more invention and focus in the ways in which this sprawling journey is told. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2020
B 89% Kajillionaire (2020) The ultimate con of sorts is that we may have taken for granted the time we were able to spend with these characters, and it's only in the final moments we realize how much we'll miss them. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2020
B 80% The Mountains Are a Dream That Call to Me (2020) If a mountain-climbing adventure like Everest or Vertical Limit removed its bombastic thrill-seeking setpieces and was instead directed with the patient, reverent eye of Apichatpong Weerasethakul one may conjure up something like Mountains. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2020
C 72% Jumbo (2021) The end result is more of a confounded shrug in which the metaphors for romantic freedom and breaking the barriers of a certain path prescribed by society ring true, but the world that's set up is far from fully realized. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2020
B+ 93% Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets (2020) A tale of profound authenticity and devastating heartbreak. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2020
B 100% Crip Camp: A Disability Revolution (2020) Crip Camp is both an inspiring historical document of a grass-roots movement but also an urgent call to action for those on the sidelines of ongoing political and societal battles. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2020
A- 99% Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020) As the moral, ethical, and legal debate of abortion continues amongst higher powers, Hittman as provided an essential, specific look at just one person's struggle to have control over her own body. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2020
B 89% Zola (2020) Twitter is Shakespeare for the 21st century and, as Zola proves, Janicza Bravo is the director best adept at bringing all the peculiarity, hilarity, and ugliness of social media mayhem to the big screen. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 25, 2020
C- 51% Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (2019) J.J. Abrams' finale doesn't just directly refute many of the ideas of its predecessor-its brand of nostalgia also feels more brazenly pandering than heartfelt. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2019
C 89% The Two Popes (2019) Directed by Fernando Meirelles with the kind of hyperactivity that worked so well in his kinetic breakthrough City of God, that trait is unfortunately not helped here with Anthony McCarten's script. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 26, 2019
B+ 95% Little Women (2019) Gerwig's imagination to rethink and update a text already so woven into American culture is deserving of substantial praise. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 25, 2019
B 49% Where'd You Go, Bernadette (2019) Linklater seemingly wants to throw as much as he can into the first act before cracking open our characters to see what makes them tick, leading to a more intimate, emotionally rewarding journey. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2019
B 96% Booksmart (2019) It may begin with a scattered, cartoonish approach, but Booksmart eventually blooms into something entirely and beautifully its own. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted May 22, 2019
B 89% John Wick: Chapter 3 - Parabellum (2019) A balletic, radiant, and relentless feat of action filmmaking, captured with the kind of clear-eyed, pleasure-filled elegance reminiscent of Jacques Demy. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted May 10, 2019
B 88% Missing Link (2019) The sweet-natured, grand adventure contained within Missing Link is worth going on, even if the accompanying dialogue from those leading the way is too simple-minded to make a memorable mark. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2019
C- 44% Captive State (2019) Wyatt peppers intriguing details throughout but gets too tripped up in a deluge of timely messages that he loses sight of his characters in this jumbled, peculiarly-structured narrative. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 14, 2019
C- 59% Them That Follow (2019) Them That Follow could sell itself as a slow-burn drama, but there is no tangible burn to speak of. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 3, 2019
B- 86% Big Time Adolescence (2020) The film's comedic pull rests on Davidson's grimy likability and he more than pulls it off. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 3, 2019
B 92% Clemency (2019) Clemency is a thoroughly draining experience as if we're placed in purgatory with no means of escape, but it's ultimately powerful in the ways it shows how the death penalty has consequences for everyone involved. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 3, 2019
B- 93% Fighting with My Family (2019) Stephen Merchant's brand of dry, off-kilter comedy surges through what is an otherwise inspiring, but by-the-numbers tale of childhood aspirations come true. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2019
A- 96% American Factory (2019) This documentary feels like the beginning of a very different America and that we have such an intimate portrait of the change to come is a remarkable achievement. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2019
B- 95% Sweetheart (2019) By the finale, it's clear that Dillard may not have sky-high aims, but Sweetheart proves to be a contained, diverting creature feature that will get your heart rate pumping. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2019
C+ 48% Wounds (2019) If one wants to watch a sweaty, disturbed Armie Hammer wander around New Orleans as he's haunted by a malevolent spiritual force, Wounds satisfies on those pleasurable, if undemanding expectations with its engrossing build-up. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2019
C+ 80% Little Monsters (2019) Australia's answer to Shaun of the Dead, writer-director Abe Forsythe doesn't quite have the wit or visual inventiveness of Edgar Wright, but the raunchy punches he throws pack an entertaining-enough bite. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2019
B- 77% Judy & Punch (2020) Putting a modern, live-action spin on this fable-esque puppet tale, director Mirrah Foulkes crafts a vibrant, brutal directorial debut, even if the ultimate catharsis leaves something to be desired. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2019
B 74% The Death of Dick Long (2019) It may end up playing as a silly lark, but along with dismantling ideas of masculinity, Daniel Scheinert has also created a singularly entertaining crime comedy built on utter idiocy. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2019
A- 89% The Souvenir (2019) The Souvenir melds two well-trodden subgenres and through Joanna Hogg's refreshingly unique vision makes each feel entirely original. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2019
B+ 93% Light from Light (2019) Those going looking for frights will be rewarded with something more substantial: an experience rich with atmosphere and humanity, and drama ultimately more enlightening than the cheap thrills that pervade the dime-a-dozen ghost stories we've seen before. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2019