Ken Jaworowski Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Ken Jaworowski

Ken Jaworowski
Ken Jaworowski's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New York Times

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
58% The New Radical (2017) For such a cerebral documentary, "The New Radical" packs a wicked punch.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2017
91% Intent to Destroy (2017) While there may be no completely dispassionate way to discuss its topic - the Armenian genocide - the film's balance of emotion and composure helps make its stories even stronger.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Nov 9, 2017
100% A River Below (2017) The truth turns into a tangled mess in "A River Below," a bold and urgent documentary whose seemingly straightforward story quickly runs awry.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Nov 2, 2017
75% 11/8/16 (2017) The film remains engaging for its stories, and is likely to be more instructive in the future, when passions have cooled. Judging by most people here, that won't be soon.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Nov 2, 2017
No Score Yet Mully (2017) "Mully" isn't much in the way of cinema. But its courageous subject makes this documentary's shortcomings easier to overlook.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Oct 26, 2017
93% Tempestad (2016) Nightmarish stories intertwine with dreamy visuals to create an unsettling, and strangely entrancing, film in "Tempestad."‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2017
100% The Departure (2017) Like a haiku, "The Departure" weighs its words carefully. But silences, too, play a vital role here.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Oct 12, 2017
100% Diamond Island (2016) "Diamond Island" feels like a little dream; a film that, at the end, you don't finish as much as awaken from.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Oct 12, 2017
96% The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson (2017) Though this film doesn't give definitive answers on what happened to Ms. Johnson, it keeps her memory alive. That itself is a victory over indifference.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Oct 5, 2017
92% Walking Out (2017) Even when its plot starts to sag, "Walking Out" remains beautiful to watch.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Oct 5, 2017
77% Realive (2017) Like a "Black Mirror" episode combined with a philosophy seminar, "Realive" has plenty of brains. Yet it has a heart, too, and that adds a surprising amount of emotion to this above-average science-fiction film.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
86% Blood Stripe (2017) The script relies on subtext and Ms. Nowlin's expressions to convey her condition. She's up to the task; even in the many silent moments, she's compelling.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
53% Bobbi Jene (2017) "Bobbi Jene" may interest viewers who are well versed in contemporary dance. All others are on their own.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 21, 2017
100% Strong Island (2017) This potent film gives equal weight to complex emotions as well as bare facts. In the same way, it's not just the story of a man's death, but also a study of the aftermath.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
No Score Yet Wrestling Jerusalem (2017) Mr. Davidman ends up not far from where he begins - his first line is "It's complicated." But that doesn't mean nothing is gained.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2017
100% Dolores (2017) As a girl, she says, she had wanted to be a dancer. In some way you can see that in her work: She has made activism an art form.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2017
37% Leap! (2017) You've seen it all before, though it's pleasant enough to watch again.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 23, 2017
81% The Nile Hilton Incident (2017) It's possible to admire each scene and still see this film, in its entirety, as in need of some serious sharpening.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
69% Pilgrimage (2017) Here the filmmakers take a chance and turn a strange-seeming premise into a fast-moving tale.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
40% Chronically Metropolitan (2017) Several times in "Chronically Metropolitan," a man stares at a screen as nothing happens. You'll know just how he feels.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 3, 2017
76% 68 Kill (2017) Nuttier than a bakery full of fruitcakes and sleazier than a cheap strip club, "68 Kill" is a proudly morbid heist movie that wallows in bad taste and still comes off as absurdly funny.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 3, 2017
91% Icarus (2017) Mr. Fogel could be considered either daring or foolhardy for his initial plan. But his work with Dr. Rodchenkov is levelheaded, and his documentary illuminating.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Aug 3, 2017
97% Menashe (2017) My heart broke a little near the end of "Menashe," a sweet comedy that's not without a bit of sadness. For sure, this funny and tender film prompts cheerful smiles, but sometimes they turn melancholy.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jul 27, 2017
88% RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World (2017) It's been a terrific few years for music documentaries, and that winning streak continues with "Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World."‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jul 25, 2017
100% Women Who Kill (2017) The humor is dry and the acting deadpan in "Women Who Kill," a comedy that plays it droll and is all the funnier for it.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jul 25, 2017
No Score Yet Romeo Is Bleeding (2017) The portraits drawn of these young people frequently feel half-finished. As soon as a story or a profile turns compelling, the movie switches to another topic.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jul 20, 2017
76% Killing Ground (2017) These personality-free characters fade from your mind even as you're watching the screen, making the brutality waged against them akin to animated mutilation of cartoon creatures.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jul 20, 2017
100% 500 Years (2017) You may find yourself championing its subjects even while feeling confounded by the omission of details by its filmmaker.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jul 11, 2017
59% Marie Curie: The Courage of Knowledge (2017) If we don't always know what drives Curie, we see the determination itself. That's enough to keep the film moving along.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2017
63% All The Rage (Saved By Sarno) (2017) "All the Rage" overrides most of its shortcomings by keeping a breezy tone and by showing Dr. Sarno to be a convincing speaker, as well as an affable and somewhat crusty character.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2017
89% Paulina (La patota) (2017) As stinging as a slap in the face, "Paulina" feels as if it's waking you from a stupor, then shaking you, demanding that you ask yourself some impossible questions about idealism and justice.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2017
83% F(l)ag Football (2017) It should go without saying, but Mr. Greenleaf knows it's worth showing: On the field and off, we are all so much alike.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017
No Score Yet From the Ashes (2017) Michael Bonfiglio, the film's director, provides a concise overview of the issues.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 1, 2017
41% Vincent N Roxxy (2017) Aspirations matter, and the cast members remain dedicated to their brooding roles as the script admirably reaches for emotions it only sometimes captures.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jun 1, 2017
92% Joshua: Teenager vs. Superpower (2017) Joe Piscatella, the director, dives in immediately to set a speedy pace. He also provides a quick summary of Hong Kong's recent history, and looks to the future.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 25, 2017
100% Legion of Brothers (2017) You'll have to wade through several topics to get to the heart of "Legion of Brothers," but once you're there, some intense stories make the effort worthwhile.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 18, 2017
97% Burden (2017) True, discussions of art tend to be subjective and open-ended. But these works were made to be debated with a passion that is sometimes lacking here.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
50% Julian Schnabel: A Private Portrait (2017) This documentary serves as a feature-length advertisement for the artist, and is about as daring as a billboard for skim milk.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
No Score Yet The Penguin Counters (2017) Here's what sounds like one dud job: calculating bird populations in Antarctica. But here's what that work has inspired: one swell documentary.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 20, 2017
92% Finding Oscar (2017) The barbarity described in "Finding Oscar" is stomach-turning, but moments of courage still shine through in this unsettling yet vital documentary.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 13, 2017
83% Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back (2017) The art is the star and Ms. Axelrod features plenty of it.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 13, 2017
100% Tickling Giants (2017) There's a lot to laugh at, and to learn from, in "Tickling Giants," a documentary that starts off by telling the story of one man and ends up speaking volumes about satire, freedom of expression and political pressure.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 16, 2017
100% Uncertain (2017) A very fine film.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 8, 2017
100% Love & Taxes (2017) If there aren't many big laughs here, there are enough smiles to make the time pass pleasantly enough.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
75% Stray Bullets (2017) Mr. Fessenden's ambition is admirable, and there's more than a little raw skill on display. If this, his first feature, isn't always worth recommending, his talents are certainly worth encouraging.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2017
33% Ali and Nino (2016) "Ali and Nino" aspires to epicness and comes pretty close to getting there.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Nov 17, 2016
100% Asperger's Are Us (2016) "Asperger's Are Us" rarely stretches to be funny or poignant or touching, and that makes this documentary all the more of each.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Nov 10, 2016
84% The Ivory Game (2016) While more information on the animals and their ecosystems is needed, the stakes described here are immense, as is the sorrow over majestic creatures massacred only so that their tusks can be made into baubles.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Nov 3, 2016
No Score Yet Ivory. A Crime Story (2016) This roughly constructed yet passionate documentary isn't shy about showing the massacre of elephants or about calling out the groups implicit in the killings. That bluntness and courage usually overrides the uneven filmmaking.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Nov 3, 2016
No Score Yet Thank You for Your Service (2016) Scenes ... make you want to scream in frustration at the bureaucracy faced by combat veterans seeking mental health services.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Oct 27, 2016