Leah Pickett Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Leah Pickett

Leah Pickett
Leah Pickett's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Chicago Reader, Consequence of Sound

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet Godless (Bezbog) (2016) Ivanova is a fine actor, but her character lacks dimension; the nurse's sordid environment and the abasement she endures to the point of numbness make her feel like a personification of the country's political corruption and social unrest.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Mar 16, 2017
19% Table 19 (2017) The film has a clever premise that probably would have worked as a half-hour TV episode but fails to sustain a feature-length comedy.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Mar 9, 2017
92% Logan (2017) Director James Mangold, returning after the second installment, The Wolverine, orchestrates several jaw-dropping action sequences, heightened by Jackman's and Keen's intense performances and by Marco Beltrami's taut and plunky score.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
67% Before I Fall (2017) The main characters are high school bullies, but director Ry-Russo Young refuses to stereotype them; they can be sweet and endearing one moment, petty and cruel the next, but their motivation is always clear.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
75% You're Killing Me Susana (Me estás matando Susana) (2017) [An] engaging film, exploring the link between honesty and intimacy.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2017
No Score Yet Unbroken Glass (2014) A study of grief, forgiveness, and how family history can provide a greater understanding of oneself. ‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2017
40% A Cure For Wellness (2017) Seems to last forever and, when it finally ends, leaves a sour aftertaste of overproduced, overblown schlock.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2017
100% 2017 Oscar Nominated Shorts: Live Action (2017) Of the five live-action shorts nominated this year, three focus on personal fulfillment... The other two shorts are overtly political, and they throb with an urgency the others lack.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2017
60% Sophie and the Rising Sun (2017) The premise... demands more heat and complexity than this hokey 2016 drama provides.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2017
20% 1 Night (One Night) (2017) This romantic fantasy works on a conceptual level, but not in execution.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2017
90% John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) Even more entertaining the second time around.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2017
14% Below her Mouth (2016) Why these two women are attracted to each other beyond looks is a mystery; eventually they swap backstories, but neither is compelling enough for one to invest in the character.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2017
17% The Space Between Us (2017) This corny sci-fi drama abounds with annoying plot holes and product placements, and the 2017 teenspeak ("You ghosted me!") will probably sound dated to anyone watching the movie even a few years from now.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2017
92% Antarctica: Ice & Sky (La glace et le ciel) (2017) Director Luc Jacquet struggles to dredge up the sort of emotion he delivered so easily in his Oscar-winning March of the Penguins (2005).‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2017
43% xXx: Return of Xander Cage (2017) This is only slightly less dumb and nonsensical than the previous films, but it teems with thrilling action sequences and rollicking stunt work from the middle-aged Diesel and martial artist Donnie Yen.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2017
94% Midsummer in Newtown (2017) Filmmaker Lloyd Kramer (Liz & Dick) delivers powerful vignettes involving three families... but shies away from such issues as the plague of gun violence and the rise of angry young men in America.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2017
33% A Dog's Purpose (2017) Gad's voice-over often seems incongruous with the dogs' onscreen behavior, and he's rarely as funny or touching as he tries to be.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2017
43% Bakery in Brooklyn (My Bakery in Brooklyn) (2017) The plot may be predictable, but the leads have nice chemistry and writer-director Gustavo Ron sprinkles in some funny and touching family moments.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2017
23% The Bye Bye Man (2017) The script teems with horror clichés (scribbled drawings, a creepy kid, the skeptical protagonist looking up the demon's origins on a library computer), and everything from the acting to the makeup to the special effects is atrocious.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2017
93% Notes on Blindness (2016) English writer and theologian John Hull, who went blind in the early 1980s and kept an audio diary of his experience, is the subject of this thought-provoking film, which takes an unusual if not always successful approach to the documentary form.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Jan 5, 2017
100% In Her Name (Au nom de ma fille) (2016) The film benefits from Auteuil's moving lead performance, though the narrative is less exciting than it is resolute.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Dec 22, 2016
40% Why Him? (2016) For this puerile farce, director John Hamburg recycles a tired premise -- a straitlaced father disapproves of his daughter's freewheeling boyfriend -- and then drowns it in moose urine (really).‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Dec 22, 2016
31% Passengers (2016) Ostensibly we're supposed to like Pratt and Lawrence together, yet Pratt's character does something so unforgivable to Lawrence's at the outset that their ensuing interactions simmer with a mix of horror and disbelief.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Dec 21, 2016
100% A Stray (2016) Despite the touchy subject matter, Syeed avoids preaching and instead focuses on the protagonist's day-to-day struggle; the understated drama benefits also from Yoni Brook's crisp cinematography and Abdirahman's multifaceted performance.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2016
85% Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) Except for a few jocose, fan-serving moments, the movie is a dour affair, lacking the charm and chills of J.J. Abrams's spirited Star Wars: The Force Awakens, not to mention George Lucas's founding trilogy.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2016
95% Moana (2016) The narrative is a fairly predictable hero's journey -- Maui even calls her "The Chosen One" -- but the movie is refreshing for its lack of a love interest; instead Moana learns how to chart her own course.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2016
76% The Eyes of My Mother (2016) The film benefits from Zach Kuperstein's moody black-and-white cinematography and the stark compositions, but the unrelenting ugliness and senselessness of the piece negate its occasional touches of minimalist beauty. ‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2016
73% Nocturnal Animals (2016) Ultimately the drama, adapted from a 1993 book by Austin Wright, constitutes a loose assemblage of ideas about romantic betrayal, selfishness, and regret.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Nov 17, 2016
92% The Eagle Huntress (2016) Factor in the feel-good story, Bell's bracing cinematography, and his meticulous observance of the villagers' customs and environments, and the film becomes a multilayered exploration of dignity, perseverance, and progress.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Nov 17, 2016
95% The Edge of Seventeen (2016) This is the first feature by writer-director Kelly Fremon Craig, and despite the conventional teenpic narrative, her protagonist is richly conceived.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Nov 17, 2016
No Score Yet Foam Bath (Habfürdö) (1980) This feature-length animation by Hungarian painter and filmmaker György Kovásznai reveals a gift for jazzy, kaleidoscopic storytelling.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Nov 10, 2016
No Score Yet A Fool (Yi ge shao zi) (2015) Reveals a humanist core beneath layers of dry irony and cynicism.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Nov 4, 2016
33% Beauty And The Beast (La belle et la bête) (2016) This 2014 adaptation of the French fairy tale looks spectacular, with vibrant landscapes and lavish 18th-century costumes, but... [Léa Seydoux, as the fair maiden, and Vincent Cassell] are stiff and perfunctory.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Oct 27, 2016
4/4 97% Moonlight (2016) A haunting piece of high art.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Oct 20, 2016
90% Elle (2016) Verhoeven masterfully stretches the suspense, and his gallows humor lands most of the time. His attempts at edginess slide into exploitation, though.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Oct 20, 2016
96% After the Storm (Umi yori mo mada fukaku) (2017) Kore-ada has explored the father-son dynamic in his previous work, most notably Still Walking (2008) and Like Father, Like Son (2013), and brings a gentle, humanist approach to the material.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Oct 20, 2016
79% American Honey (2016) Lane, whom Arnold discovered lounging on a Miami beach, recalls Jennifer Lawrence in Winter's Bone, balancing an inherent toughness with the fragility of girlhood.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Oct 6, 2016
64% Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (2016) Burton has covered similar ground already, but fans will relish this spooky return to form.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 29, 2016
84% Kicks (2016) The motif of a faceless, imaginary spaceman following the boy around is overly precious, but what does work is Tipping's focus on sensitive boys hardening in reaction to their father figures (or lack thereof).‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2016
93% Queen of Katwe (2016) David Oyelowo and Lupita Nyong'o are reliably superb in the critical supporting roles of Mutesi's chess coach and young mother, respectively.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2016
83% Jimmy Vestvood: Amerikan Hero (2016) In the style of Borat, director Jonathan Kesselman and cowriters Jobrani and Amir Ohebsion use raunchy, puerile humor to jab at American prejudices toward the Middle East.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2016
57% The Seasons in Quincy: Four Portraits of John Berger (2016) This might have worked better as a more cohesive documentary. ‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2016
94% Slash (2016) The weird world of slash -- same-sex, erotic online fan fiction -- is the focus of this delightful feature from writer-director Clay Liford.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2016
No Score Yet Those Left Behind (2017) [Finitzo's] script gives real weight and nuance to the characters' interactions and offers an interesting perspective on how grief alters people's courses, changing them from who they might otherwise have been. ‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 15, 2016
76% Bridget Jones's Baby (2016) A third installment that attempts to recapture the charm of the first (2001) but, much like the second (2004), is only a sour facsimile.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 15, 2016
81% Author: The JT LeRoy Story (2016) This documentary is well crafted but suffers from a deeply unsympathetic protagonist.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 15, 2016
76% The Apostate (El Apóstata) (2016) This Spanish-Uruguayan satire about a man struggling to leave his Catholic church in Madrid offers a wry absurdist take on existential crisis without resorting to cliche.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 15, 2016
83% My Love, Don't Cross That River (2016) Moyoung's unfettered access to the pair is extraordinary, yet they often seem to be performing for his approval.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 8, 2016
91% Southside With You (2016) Southside With You showcases a city as photogenic, dynamic, and charming as the lovers themselves.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 1, 2016
59% The Light Between Oceans (2016) At the climax the wife makes a decision antithetical to her character, and a morally complex film derails into hackneyed Nicholas Sparks territory.‐ Chicago Reader
Read More | Posted Sep 1, 2016